Anasazi, Hohokam, Prehistoric, Mimbres, Kayenta, ChacoTreasures Of Our Past
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LARGE MIMBRES STONE TURTLE EFFIGY,RARE!! C.400-1200AD

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Stone: Pre 1492   item# 322794 (stock# A800)

LARGE MIMBRES STONE TURTLE EFFIGY,RARE!! C.400-1200AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$2,600.00 

This wonderful turtle effigy measures 6 inches long, 5.5 inches wide and 3 inches tall and exhibits excellent carving and relief. The stone, which has significant wear all over, is volcanic which is used in both the Hohokam and Mimbres cultures; this example I believe is Mimbres (C. 400 - 1200AD). The detail is quite extraordinary with the protruding head, feet, side lines and the crisscross design of the shell on the back. The piece is in mint condition. A very scarce and desirable item.............. ARTIFACT AUTHENTICATION papers from Ben Stermer will be provided attesting to age and origin. (please see photo 6)


RARE BIG HOMOLOVI BOWL C. 1300 - 1400AD MINT

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Pre 1492   item# 588547 (stock# A-119)

RARE BIG HOMOLOVI BOWL C. 1300 - 1400AD MINT
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$2,775.00 NET 

Homolovi pottery comes from only two sites near Winslow Arizona and is one of the important types that bridged the gap from Anasazi to Hopi pottery. The area was popular for cotton farming, as evidenced by the weaving looms, spindle whorls and massive amounts of cottonseed that have been found at the ruins. The nearby Little Colorado River provided water for the inhabitants, the cotton and their other crops. The site was along the prehistoric Palatkwapi Trail, which ran from Montezuma Castle to the Hopi mesas. Trading of cotton, pottery and parrots was common between the many prehistoric sites in northern Arizona. At the peak, it is estimated, 5,000 people lived at Homolovi. Homolovi II, the largest of the four pueblos, it had three plazas and stone walls rising two to three stories, and housed several thousand people. In the 1400s, the area was abandoned, just as were many other Southwest ruins.

We recently acquired acquired this beautiful and important bowl in a small estate auction back east. It must have been an item that someone had acquired on a trip out west. The bowl is in absolute pristine condition with not a single flaw; it measures 11.25 inches wide and 4.75 inches deep.

This is absolutely one of the finest pieces, condition wise, that we have had the privilege to own. The price is way below what the true market value would be as we purchased it very reasonably and want to pass the savings on to one of our collectors.


MINT HOHOKAM TANQUE VERDE BOWL C. 1050 - 1200AD

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Pre 1492   item# 196362 (stock# A84)

MINT HOHOKAM TANQUE VERDE BOWL C. 1050 - 1200AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$3,100.00 

This is a wonderful Tanque Verde bowl (C. 1100 - 1200AD) measuring a full 11" in diameter and 7" deep. It has bold paint against a cream background encompassing all of the exterior and extending into the interior. It is intact with a small pressure crack in the bottom which cannot be seen from the exterior. This item was discovered by Dr. Raymond Thomas of Phoenix Arizona and has no restoration of any kind. A very rare piece. This item was discovered by Dr. Ray Thomas on private land in the early 1980's.

This rare bowl was in my collection from 1996 to 2003. Because of the exceptional condition we recently repurchased the bowl as we do with so many of the pieces we sell.

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS NOT IN VIOLATION OF ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL LAWS.




ANASAZI FLUORITE/COTTON BRACELET C. 1100 – 1250AD

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Pre 1492   item# 443254 (stock# S-106)

ANASAZI FLUORITE/COTTON BRACELET C. 1100 – 1250AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$8,300.00 SOLD 

Offered here is an extremely rare 100% original Anasazi bracelet which is made from New Mexico fluorite strung on cotton cord. This piece was discovered in the fall of 1982 by Chris Robinson (General Hospital fame) and two of his friends when they were excavating a ruin on a private ranch just south of Reserve New Mexico. The bracelet was found inside a small plain ware jar which accounts for the excellent state of preservation. There are four fluorite pieces carved in the shape of bear claws and three cylindrical beads threaded on a cord of wrapped cotton. The New Mexico fluorite material has been confirmed by Wayne Thompson who is a well known mineral expert.

Anasazi and Hohokam carved jewelry pieces are highly coveted by institutions and collectors alike … they are virtually never encountered in such a state of preservation. Needless to say this is one of the most important surviving items of prehistoric Native American jewelry extant.

The photos are true to the real colors of the piece, two of the claws have chips which are insignificant.


ANASAZI INTACT RESERVE PARROT EFFIGY C. 1100AD

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pottery: Pre 1492   item# 752552 (stock# T-319)

ANASAZI INTACT RESERVE PARROT EFFIGY C. 1100AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


Reduced To $8,500 NET. This is an exceptional buy! 

This mint Reserve Parrot was excavated on the Tommy Cox ranch in New Mexico in the summer of 1998 along with an animal quadruped which is also listed on this site. The bird measures 6.4 inches long by 7.25 inches tall and 6 inches wide at the breast. This piece was made to function as a canteen as evidenced by the loop near the tail and the loop at the back of the head. The beak of the bird is curled just as would be with a parrot. The piece is excellently potted and the painted design is bold and well done. The eyes protrude and are surrounded with mask-like elements. There is a chip at the top right of the opening which is the only thing keeping this piece from being mint. There is no restoration or addition of paint of any kind.

A close comparison of this parrot to the quadruped will leave no question that both pieces were created and painted by the same person. For that reason it would be desirable to keep the two pieces together.


MINT SNOWFLAKE PITCHER, C. 1125-1250AD

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pre 1492   item# 164820 (stock# A-7)

MINT SNOWFLAKE PITCHER, C. 1125-1250AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD 

A simply wonderful and perfect pitcher exhibiting jet black, glazed paint on a white background. The design is classic with the many lines on the neck and ticking on the rim. As if it needed anything else, the handle is in the form of a dog head. This pitcher is in perfect condition.

Measures 6” x 6”.

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS NOT IN VIOLATION OF ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL LAWS.


C. 1540-41 CONQUISTADOR GRAVE MARKER - KATCHINA

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pottery: Pre 1700   item# 164821 (stock# S-2020)

<B>C. 1540-41 CONQUISTADOR GRAVE MARKER - KATCHINA</B>
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


REDUCED IN OCT. 2011 TO $10,650.00  

Background

Spaniard Francisco Vásquez de Coronado became the first known European to lead an expedition into the USA when, in 1540, he with 335 soldiers and about 1100 settlers crossed the Mexican border near the Huachuca Mountains, site of the present day Coronado National Monument. Six months into the march he rode into a cluster of Zuni pueblos, Cibola, near present day Gallup. He attacked the Zuni at Hawikuh, taking over that principle town and its food stores for his famished soldiers. At Cicuye, later called Pecos, 150 miles east the reception was different. The Indians welcomed the Spaniards with music and gifts. A Plains Indian captive at Pecos told of a rich land to the east, Quivira, and Coronado set out in spring 1541 to find it. Wandering as far as Kansas he found only a few villages. His Indian guide confessed he lured the army on to the plains to die, and Coronado had him strangled. The expedition turned back. After a bleak winter along the Rio Grande the broken army went back to Mexico empty handed.

Colonizers and Missionaries

Nearly 60 years now passed before Spaniards came to New Mexico to stay. In 1581 explorers began prospecting for silver in the land of the Pueblos. Their failures foreshadowed a truth that determined much of Spanish New Mexico's history: that province held neither golden cities nor ready riches. But the fact that settlers could farm and herd there focused the joint strategies of Cross and Crown: Pueblo Indians could be converted and their lands colonized. Don Juan de Oñate was first to pursue this mixed objective, in 1598. Taking settlers, livestock, and 10 Franciscans he marched north to claim for Spain the land across the Rio Grande. Right away he assigned a friar to Pecos, richest and most powerful New Mexico pueblo. The new religion got off to a shaky start. After episodes of idol-smashing provoked Indian resentment, the Franciscans sent veteran missionary Fray Andrés Juárez to Pecos in 1621 as healer and builder. Under his direction the Pecos built an adobe church south of the pueblo, the most imposing of New Mexico’s mission churches.

War and Re-Conquest Decades of Spanish demands and Indian resentments climaxed in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Indians in scattered pueblos united to drive the Spaniards back to Mexico. At Pecos loyal Indians warned the local priest, but most followed a tribal elder in revolt. They killed the priest, destroyed the church, desecrated symbols of the Catholic Church, and, symbolizing the discontent, built a forbidden kiva in mission’s convento itself. One of the most often desecrated symbols were the crosses, both those used in the churches as well as those marking graves. Twelve years later, led by Diego de Vargas, the Spaniards came back to their lost province, peacefully in some places but with the sword in others.

The Katchina Stone Cross

Coronado's group spent the winter of 1540 - 1541 at the Pecos Pueblo very near the town of Pecos New Mexico in the upper Pecos River valley. During this time many of the soldiers and settlers died not being able to withstand the winter. It is documented in the writings from the expedition that those who died were buried in graves each marked with a stone cross. As a result of the revolt in 1680 the Indians desecrated many crosses including those that marked graves. The cross offered here was found in the Pecos Valley of New Mexico east of Santa Fe, the same area Coronado wintered in 1540 and is consistent in form and size with known Conquistador grave markers. It measures 38.1cm tall, 19cm wide and 5.1cm thick and exhibits significant age and mineral deposits on the reverse. As a result of the desecration of the cross, there is a deep inverted triangle inscribed above the cross member forming the face of the Katchina. Attached just below this first triangle is a second inverted, more shallow triangle, which forms the breast of the Katchina. Descending from the second triangle is a vertical inscribed line which extends to the bottom edge. The two horizontal extensions of the cross each exhibit a deep grove which forms the arms of the Katchina. In addition the upper triangle forms the face and has indentations which form the eyes, nose and mouth - these are clearly evident in the photographs. Both triangles have an ancient olive-green paint which was applied most likely to set off the body of the Katchina. Overall the front of the cross has significant "hand patina" which could only have formed over a long, extended time thus attesting to the age of the piece. During all periods excluding the Pueblo Revolt years Catholic icons were held in high esteem and would not have been desecrated or altered in any way by the Indians. This is without question a historically important piece from the now famous time period known as The Pueblo Revolt.


MINT, PERFECT SOCORRO OLLA, C. 1050AD

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pre 1492   item# 164824 (stock# A-17)

MINT, PERFECT SOCORRO OLLA, C. 1050AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD 

An absolutely perfect Socorro Olla measuring 16.25” by 16” with white slip and very dark black paint. This was found in a lava flow on a private ranch in New Mexico around 1990 along with four others. Large ollas in perfect condition are exceedingly scarce and rarely found in today’s market.

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS NOT IN VIOLATION OF ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL LAWS


RESERVE "GOURD" LADLE C. 1125-1250AD

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pre 1492   item# 164861 (stock# A-53)

RESERVE "GOURD" LADLE  C. 1125-1250AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD 

An interesting and scarce Reserve ladle in the shape of an opened gourd. The slip is a beautiful smooth white and the design an intricate interlocked steps in black. Ladles are one of the most popular of the Anasazi pottery shapes and are difficult to find in perfect condition.

This item was unearthed in 1983 on the Hudson ranch just south of Reserve New Mexico.

MINT measuring 7.8” x 4” at the bowl.

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS NOT IN VIOLATION OF ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL LAWS.


MINT ST. JOHN BLACK/ORANGE CANTEEN C. 1100AD

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pre 1492   item# 164864 (stock# A-56)

MINT ST. JOHN BLACK/ORANGE CANTEEN C. 1100AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD 

A wonderful and perfect canteen with a beautiful orange slip. The design is executed in an extremely dark black paint an exhibits a rare “negative design” when viewed from the top. Most canteens are black and white and few are known in red or orange.

EX. Dr. Raymond Thomas, Phoenix Arizona

MINT measuring 5.5” x 5.4” in perfect condition.

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS NOT IN VIOLATION OF ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL LAWS.


LARGE MINT GILA BOWL C. 1200AD

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pre 1492   item# 164870 (stock# A-82)

LARGE MINT GILA BOWL  C. 1200AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD 

This very large bowl is considered to be one of the top Gila bowls extant. The shape is referred to as a "cauldron" being very deep with steep walls that finish with a flair out at the top. Virtually all Gila pottery suffers from a flaking of the paint known as exfoliation, something not seen on this piece…the paint is bold and perfect with a hard and shinny finish. It would be hard to find a more perfect Gila bowl….yes the price is high but the condition, shape and art is perfect.

MINT measuring 13.5” in diameter and 5.4” deep.

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS N


MINT ABSTRACT FOUR MILE BOWL C. 1325 - 1375AD

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Pre 1492   item# 167499 (stock# A-72)

MINT ABSTRACT FOUR MILE BOWL C. 1325 - 1375AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD 

I consider this bowl to be the best bowl I owned when I was collecting between 1996 and 2002. Yes, there are a lot of bowls that may cost more but none have the "presence" I feel this one has. In 2003 I sold the bowl and regretted every minute thereafter.... until I was fortunate to repurchase it in September 2005. This bowl, measuring 8.7” by 3.7”, is regarded as one of the best examples of Four Mile art extant. The bowl was discovered at the Four Mile Ruin in 1974 by Bob Skousen and is the only example recorded that exhibits the arrangement of bows and arrows on the exterior. The interior exhibits an incredible abstract image of a parrot executed in a manner that, when rotated 180 degrees, the image is virtually the same. The exterior is also remarkable – there are three sets of bows and arrows!

The bowl is in perfect condition with no restoration and all original paint. The fact that all the white paint has survived is nothing short of impossible.

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS NOT IN VIOLATION OF ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL LAWS.

EX. SKOWSEN, SHRADER


INCREDIBLE MINT SOCORRO EFFIGY, C. 1150AD 9.5 " TALL

Catalogue: Archives: Pre 1492   item# 257650 (stock# A-400)

INCREDIBLE MINT SOCORRO EFFIGY, C. 1150AD  9.5 " TALL
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD FEBRUARY 27, 2008 

Two uranium miners west of grants New Mexico found this incredibly rare Socorro effigy in 1960 while searching small cave on their lunch break. After that, it sat on the mantle of one of them until I purchased it in late November 2003. Nothing could have been done better by it’s creator…the form and artwork are simply perfect. There is even a wonderful image of a humann on the handle. It is 100% original, intact, no restoration and not even cleaned. This is the best “original find” effigy to come on the market in well over a decade, maybe more. One extremely knowledgeable dealer in the business for 30 years stated that it may be the largest intact effigy he has ever seen (9.5” tall and 9.25” long). Very serious inquires are encouraged.


ANASAZI MINT MESA VERDE C.1100AD LADLE W/ FLUTE HANDLE

Catalogue: Archives: Collectibles: Pre 1492   item# 298220 (stock# A-218)

ANASAZI MINT MESA VERDE C.1100AD LADLE W/ FLUTE HANDLE
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD! 

This Mesa Verde ladle is possibly the finest know example extant. It measures 11.25” long and 5.2” wide at the bowl and has a beautiful slip and a killer design in perfect paint on the interior of the bowl. The handle is a rattle handle and has many holes running from the bowl to the end; the slip shows some minor crackling where the handle meets the bowl. What is amazing is the exterior of the bowl has a wonderful design that is virtually never seen on Anasazi ladles. This is an example for the collect that demands only the very best.


VERY RARE ANASAZI P-IV POLYCHROME BASKET, MINT

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pre 1492   item# 343801 (stock# A802)

VERY RARE ANASAZI P-IV POLYCHROME BASKET, MINT
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


SOLD! 

Pottery is “for ever”, it will survive in excess of 10,000 years given normal conditions. But items made from plant material usually deteriorate in a few decades which makes the survival of this amazing basket all that more incredible! Measuring 5.5” tall and 3.9” wide it is composed of willow rods and polychrome reed material. It is in perfect condition without and type of restoration whatsoever.

The period for the basket is P-IV (1300 - 1525AD) and is completely consistent with the designs known to have been made during the period with pottery.

This basket offers the sophisticated collector a rare opportunity to acquire a basket type which is virtually never seen in the marketplace today. Please feel free to call and discuss this important item with me.

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