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Chinese Teacup Box with Longevity Emblem

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Chinese: Folk Art: Pre 1910   item# 1245419 (stock# 60-25)

Chinese Teacup Box with Longevity Emblem
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


 

This late Qing Dynasty teacup box has a high handle carved with the figure of a deer, an auspicious Chinese symbol used to wish longevity. Foliage, flowers and scalloping also are carved on both sides of the handle as well as on the ear-like curved ends that hold the handle in place. The rich red lacquer on the wooden box contrasts nicely with touches of deep, dark green and faint gilding. The container is fitted with a removable half-lid that allowed stacks of traditional Chinese teacups witho ...click for details


19th Century Burmese Parabaik

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Lacquer: Pre 1900   item# 1244658 (stock# 39-32)

19th Century Burmese Parabaik
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


 

From late 19th century Burma, this parabaik, or book, is made of thick cardboard-like paper folded accordion-style with front and back covers of gilded relief lacquer. The paper was made from the inner bark of the mulberry tree that was boiled for a day until soft, then pounded and spread on fabric that was stretched across a frame. The frame was repeatedly dipped in water and drained, then dried in the sun, spread with glue and chalk powder, and finally, polished with seeds. The thick paper ...click for details


Cinnabar Lacquer Burmese Kun-it Box

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Lacquer: Pre 1900   item# 1239618 (stock# 63-26)

Cinnabar Lacquer Burmese Kun-it Box
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


 

This cinnabar-colored four-piece lacquer box from late 19th century Burma has intricate designs incised in fine black lines on its hatbox-style lid, high-sided container and two trays. The tortoise shell design is interspersed with small circles, and the lid top is centered with a gold-accented drawing of a character in native dress. Cylindrical boxes such as this, called “kun-it,” were designed for storing and serving ingredients to assemble a quid, or chew, of betel, a mild stimulant that wa ...click for details


Large Cinnabar Lacquer Burmese Kwet Bowl

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Lacquer: Pre 1910   item# 1136045 (stock# 63-11)

Large Cinnabar Lacquer Burmese Kwet Bowl
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


 

The cinnabar lacquer covering this late 19th/early 20th century Burmese “kwet,” or serving bowl, is satin smooth and cool to the touch. Years of daily use have enhanced both the look and feel of this large bowl, with black lacquer showing through the red in areas of wear. Six black ribs curve down to the feet, and the top is curved and rolled inward, giving the vessel beautiful balance. The old Burmese process of producing such lacquer pieces was labor intensive and time consuming. Woven and co ...click for details


Burmese Lacquer Hsun-ok Offering Bowl

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Lacquer: Pre 1900   item# 1106224 (stock# 57-29)

Burmese Lacquer Hsun-ok Offering Bowl
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


SOLD 

This 19th century Burmese lacquer offering bowl, called a hsun-ok, differs in size from the typical spired vessels used to carry offerings of food to Burma’s Buddhist monasteries. This one is smaller—20 inches in height and 9 inches in diameter, while the average size of a hsun-ok is about 30 inches tall and 15 inches in diameter. With its dramatic shape and intense red hue, it is every bit the same compelling cultural artifact as its larger brothers, and hsun-ok offering vessels in this small ...click for details


Burmese Lacquer Zodiac Signs Box

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Lacquer: Pre 1910   item# 1066740 (stock# 57-65)

Burmese Lacquer Zodiac Signs Box
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


SOLD 

A lacquer box from early 20th century Burma has intricate drawings of the 12 Burmese zodiac signs incised around the container, and eight cardinal signs for the days of the week around on the top of the lid. Also on the lid are two inscriptions in Burmese, one with the wish “be rich” and the other “be healthy.” The eight signs for the days of the week reflect the Burmese custom of using two signs for Wednesday, one for the morning and one for the afternoon. The 12 Burmese astrological signs fo ...click for details


Burmese Black Lacquer Offering Bowl Hsun Kwet

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Pre 1910   item# 1024442 (stock# 57-70)

Burmese Black Lacquer Offering Bowl Hsun Kwet
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


SOLD 

This early 20th century five-piece Buddhist offering bowl is a lacquerware design unique to Burma. It is from a classification of vessels called “hsun ok,” containers that were used to present offerings of food at Buddhist monasteries, an especially important rite in the practice of Buddhism in Burma. The particular design of this one, know as an “ok kwet,” or a “hsun kwet,” was practical for that purpose, incorporating three bowls and two trays into a pleasingly rounded shape crowned with a st ...click for details


Burmese Temple Lion Chimera Figure

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Sculpture: Pre 1920   item# 943598 (stock# 57-44)

Burmese Temple Lion Chimera Figure
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


SOLD 

This fantastic composite creature, a “tadiya yupa,” with features of a lion, goat, bird and serpent, once stood as a good omen in a Buddhist temple in Burma. Often referred to as brave lions, such friendly/fierce chimera figures are much loved in Burma, appearing in temple art and on personal items such as medicine and betel boxes. They are regarded both as protectors and as dispensers of good fortune. This one is particularly impressive because of its size and detailing. It is carved of Burmes ...click for details


Large Shan Red and Black Lacquer Footed bowl

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Lacquer: Pre 1910   item# 929783 (stock# 63-14)

Large Shan Red and Black Lacquer Footed bowl
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


 

An especially handsome lacquer bowl, called a “kwet,” is from the Shan people, a southeast Asian tribal group living primarily in northeast Burma. Similar Shan bowls, though not identical to this one, are pictured in a book from the British Museum Press entitled “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer” by Isaacs and Blurton, on pages 183 and 184, where they are labeled with the spelling “khwet.” This bowl has an inscription on the bottom that is difficult to decipher but it ...click for details


Pagan Incised Lacquer Box Signed by Maker

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Lacquer: Pre 1920   item# 922753 (stock# 63-29)

Pagan Incised Lacquer Box Signed by Maker
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


SOLD 

Delicately incised yun designs on a three-piece lacquer betel box from the Burmese city of Pagan depict scenes of five elegantly dressed courtiers, each portrayed within a distinctive and elaborate portal. The name of the artisan, Ko Sein Maung, is incised in one ribbon-like cartouche, and his locale, Pagan Dikesu, in another. The wish, chantha basage (may you be rich), appears in a third cartouche. The container has three parts—a deep lid, a high base and a fitted tray. It is designed to retain ...click for details


Pair Burmese Nat Deities

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Folk Art: Pre 1920   item# 919136 (stock# 63-64)

Pair Burmese Nat Deities
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


 

Two kneeling nats, possibly representing the Taungbyon brothers, among the most revered deities in the Burmese spirit world of nats, are carved with identical positions and thrones but faces that are quite different from one another. Widespread belief among the Burmese of nats, the spirits of certain departed humans, and also of nat spirits of trees, rivers, rocks and more, predates the introduction of Buddhism in Burma. Thirty-seven nats, both protectors and rogues, each with its own complex s ...click for details


Carved Shan Monkey Ladle

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Wood: Pre 1910   item# 914601 (stock# 63-21)

Carved Shan Monkey Ladle
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


 

A lacquered teak rice scoop from the Shan tribal people who live in eastern Burma and along the northwestern Thai border has a charming monkey perched at the end of its curved handle. The monkey, with both hands under his chin, stares out in wide-eyed wonder. Some time ago we sold a Shan water ladle of lacquered teak that had several monkeys cavorting along the handle (see 64-31 in our Archives) and our guess is that the monkeys on that piece and the one on this piece reflect the colonies of mon ...click for details


Burmese Lacquered Teak Mythical Animal Medicine Box

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Pre 1950   item# 902437 (stock# 63-95)

Burmese Lacquered Teak Mythical Animal Medicine Box
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


SOLD 

A medicine box from Burma in the form of a mythical composite animal is carved of the local dense teak wood and lacquered in red that has worn and aged to reveal a primary coating of black lacquer, creating a pleasing patina. We have seen other old Burmese medicine boxes in strange animal shapes, perhaps carved with the intent of scaring off ill omens. This one appears to be part tiger, part dragon, which is the second such combination we have seen, suggesting that this particular pairing was a ...click for details


Miniature Shan Hsun ok Lacquer Offering Bowls

Catalogue: Archives: Regional Art: Pre 1900   item# 900059 (stock# 57-53)

Miniature Shan Hsun ok Lacquer Offering Bowls
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


SOLD 

Three 19th century miniature Shan offering vessels are made of wood and lacquered to mimic the large hsun-ok bowls used in Burma to carry food offerings to monasteries. Miniature hsun-ok were used primarily on home shrines, placed in front of the family’s Buddha image with offerings of flowers and other small items. Replicating the variety in design and hue of the large full size red lacquer offering vessels, these little hsun-ok are yet another look at the care lavished by Burmese artisans on l ...click for details


Black Teak Burmese Sitting Buddha

Catalogue: Vintage Arts: Regional Art: Asian: Southeast Asian: Sculpture: Pre 1940   item# 899328 (stock# 10-80)

Black Teak Burmese Sitting Buddha
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Silk Road Gallery
(203) 208-0771


SOLD 

A serene black vintage Buddha carved of dense Burmese teak emits a glow as a result of its lacquer treatment—first a coat of red lacquer, then a sheer top layer of black applied very sparingly so the red shines subtly through. This is a reversal of the traditional Burmese lacquer technique involving numerous coats of black lacquer covered with numerous coats of red, which produced handsome though much more formal antique pieces. The striking impact of this mid-20th century Buddha is heightened b ...click for details

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