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Raku Chawan by Deguchi Onisaburo (a)

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Meiji Bijutsu
Kawakami 2891-4 Yufuin-cho
Yufu-shi, Oita-ken 879-5102 Japan
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Raku Chawan by Deguchi Onisaburo (a)
Price on Request

Chawan (tea bowls) made by Deguchi Onisaburo have a special place in the world of tea ceremony vessels, not only because they were made by an exceptional man, but also because they have such unique auras.

Deguchi Onisaburo was born in 1871, and though he is mainly remembered as having been a colorful leader of the Omoto religious sect, and the spiritual teacher of Aikido founder Ueshiba Morihei, the remarkable works of art (calligraphies, paintings, poems, potteries…) he has left have contributed to creating a group of enthusiastic collectors. Among those creations, chawan are probably the most prized and their caretakers are usually keen on holding on to them for a long time.

Deguchi Onisaburo began to make tea bowls at the end of 1944 after having met Kyoto Raku-yaki (raku ware) potter Sasaki Shoraku. Although supplies for pottery making were hard to get in wartime, in a year, the highly spirited and passionate man managed to create more than 3000 bowls, which he called “yowan” (scintillating vessels). Indeed, and even though I have seen only a few, each has a particular brilliance and an awesome uniqueness. Hand made objects are charged with a piece of the soul of their creators, and Onisaburo bowls seem to have an even higher vibration, probably due to the spiritual nature of the artist.

This particular bowl has those qualities, in colors and shape. It also has the innate dynamism of objects animated by the intense energy master craftsmen insufflate into them. Deguchi Onisaburo passed away in 1948, leaving us some divine chalices.

Please inquire if you have some questions.

The chawan is in good condition, but it presents one hairline running from the mouth to the middle of the koshi (hip) (see picture12) and a tiny part of the glaze seems to have chipped off (see picture 11); that is not uncommon on very fragile Raku ware (it is possible to have the chawan repaired; kindly inquire). The bowl bears the mark of the potter and will be shipped in an unsigned box (signed box by Deguchi Onisaburo are very rare).
Dimensions: 12.5 x 7.5 cm (5 x 3 in)

Kindly read our Sales policy.
EMS shipping charges are included in the listed price.
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