Anasazi, Hohokam, Prehistoric, Mimbres, Kayenta, ChacoTreasures Of Our Past
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Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas (8)

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American Indian (8)
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HOHOKAM SLATE LIZARD PALLET, C. 950AD Anasazi

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Stone: Pre AD 1000   item# 1104397 (stock# C-1004)

HOHOKAM SLATE LIZARD PALLET, C. 950AD Anasazi
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


3,650.00 

Offered here is an incredible and very rare ​Hohokam, C. 950AD, slate pallet in the form of a lizard formerly in the Robert Worsley collection in Chicago, IL. I purchased it several years ago from the noted Hohokam authority Matt Thomas of Temple, AZ. It measures 8.25" long and 3.3" wide a generally only 3/8th of an inch thick. The lizard has four extended legs emanating from equilateral diamond shaped body; the body has a lip extending around the entire circumference of the body. Normally such pallets were crushed during the 1000 years since its manufacture but this example is intact. The third photo shows two black lines, one at the tail and one at the left rear leg. These indicate the extent of the only restoration on the piece; the tail extended and the downward portion of the right rear leg is also restored. The red line indicates the reattachment of the front left leg which is original but glued back to the body. If the lizard was completely intact it would sell in excess of $8,500 to $9,500 except there are only one or two known to exist in private hands and their current location is not known. The example offered here is exceptional, extremely rare and very well priced in this somewhat down market.


LARGE MINT CHACO DONUT BIRD EFFIGY C. 1100AD ANASAZI

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pottery: Pre 1492   item# 752589 (stock# T-320)

LARGE MINT CHACO DONUT BIRD EFFIGY C. 1100AD ANASAZI
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$11,250.00 

This wonderful and quite rare "donut" duck effigy measures 7 inches long, 6.25 inches tall and 6 inches wide at the breast. The "donut" descriptor comes from the interior hole which goes completely through the center of the effigy. The reason for this design element is unknown and subject to much discussion and conjecturer. It should be noted though that very similar designs are found in Mayan pieces excavated in the Mexico and Guatemala areas. The exterior exhibits a classic Chaco "pennant" design and extremely fine line-work; the entire piece is in "as found" condition and has no breakage, restoration or addition of any paint. Such examples are quite rare and generally found only in the most advanced collections.

Additional details are available upon request.


ANASAZI INTACT RESERVE PARROT EFFIGY C. 1100AD

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pottery: Pre 1492   item# 752552 (stock# T-319)

ANASAZI INTACT RESERVE PARROT EFFIGY C. 1100AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


Reduced To $8,500 NET. This is an exceptional buy! 

This mint Reserve Parrot was excavated on the Tommy Cox ranch in New Mexico in the summer of 1998 along with an animal quadruped which is also listed on this site. The bird measures 6.4 inches long by 7.25 inches tall and 6 inches wide at the breast. This piece was made to function as a canteen as evidenced by the loop near the tail and the loop at the back of the head. The beak of the bird is curled just as would be with a parrot. The piece is excellently potted and the painted design is bold and well done. The eyes protrude and are surrounded with mask-like elements. There is a chip at the top right of the opening which is the only thing keeping this piece from being mint. There is no restoration or addition of paint of any kind.

A close comparison of this parrot to the quadruped will leave no question that both pieces were created and painted by the same person. For that reason it would be desirable to keep the two pieces together.


MINT RESERVE QUADRAPED EFFIGY CANTEEN C. 1100AD

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pottery: Pre 1492   item# 752541 (stock# t-318)

MINT RESERVE QUADRAPED  EFFIGY CANTEEN C. 1100AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$15,900.00 

This wonderful and rare effigy was excavated on the Tommy Cox ranch in New Mexico in the summer of 1998. It measures 7.25 inches long, 7.5 inches tall and 4.75" wide at the breast. The piece was made to be a canteen as evidenced by the two loops; one loop is at the tail and the other at the back of the neck. The top of the spout shows significant wear from what was most likely the stopper which held the water in. The eyes are each protruding and emphasized by a black mask-like design. It should be specifically noted that this piece has absolutely no restoration of any kind which means that all four of the legs are original and unbroken.

The sides exhibit a classic Reserve lightening design with the back a plain white. Of specific note is the symbol on the breast which is that of an upside down, headless, human. The significance of this symbol is not fully understood.

Effigy figures are some of the most highly sought of all the Anasazi pottery and perfect mint examples are exceedingly rare.


LARGE MIMBRES STONE TURTLE EFFIGY,RARE!! C.400-1200AD

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Stone: Pre 1492   item# 322794 (stock# A800)

LARGE MIMBRES STONE TURTLE EFFIGY,RARE!! C.400-1200AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$2,600.00 

This wonderful turtle effigy measures 6 inches long, 5.5 inches wide and 3 inches tall and exhibits excellent carving and relief. The stone, which has significant wear all over, is volcanic which is used in both the Hohokam and Mimbres cultures; this example I believe is Mimbres (C. 400 - 1200AD). The detail is quite extraordinary with the protruding head, feet, side lines and the crisscross design of the shell on the back. The piece is in mint condition. A very scarce and desirable item.............. ARTIFACT AUTHENTICATION papers from Ben Stermer will be provided attesting to age and origin. (please see photo 6)


MIMBRES STONE FROG WITH ORIGINAL PAINTS, C 1100AD

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Stone: Pre 1492   item# 284879 (stock# X-100)

MIMBRES STONE FROG WITH ORIGINAL PAINTS, C 1100AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$6,600.00 Reduced $5,400 January 14, 2010 

A wonderful Mimbres stone frog with original green, yellow and red paints. It measures 5" x 3.6". From an old collection dispursed in recent months.


GIANT HOHOKAM BOWL, C. 900-1150AD

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pottery: Pre 1492   item# 164823 (stock# A-26)

GIANT HOHOKAM BOWL, C. 900-1150AD
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


$2,200.00 

An exceptionally large bowl measuring 16” in diameter! The exterior exhibits a rich red-orange color with some accenting fire clouds….the interior a jet black color. Due to the exceptional size these items are virtually never found intact.

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS NOT IN VIOLATION OF ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL LAWS.

The bowl is intact with to very minor rim cracks, no chips.

EX. Mina Brooks Collection

A RELEASE AND DISCLOSURE, WITH PICTURE, IS PROVIDED STATING THE CONDITION, APPROXIMATE AGE AND THAT POSSESSING IT IS NOT IN VIOLATION OF ANY FEDERAL, STATE OR LOCAL LAWS


C. 1540-41 CONQUISTADOR GRAVE MARKER - KATCHINA

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Americas: American Indian: Pottery: Pre 1700   item# 164821 (stock# S-2020)

<B>C. 1540-41 CONQUISTADOR GRAVE MARKER - KATCHINA</B>
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Treasures Of Our Past
480-596-3700


REDUCED IN OCT. 2011 TO $10,650.00  

Background

Spaniard Francisco Vásquez de Coronado became the first known European to lead an expedition into the USA when, in 1540, he with 335 soldiers and about 1100 settlers crossed the Mexican border near the Huachuca Mountains, site of the present day Coronado National Monument. Six months into the march he rode into a cluster of Zuni pueblos, Cibola, near present day Gallup. He attacked the Zuni at Hawikuh, taking over that principle town and its food stores for his famished soldiers. At Cicuye, later called Pecos, 150 miles east the reception was different. The Indians welcomed the Spaniards with music and gifts. A Plains Indian captive at Pecos told of a rich land to the east, Quivira, and Coronado set out in spring 1541 to find it. Wandering as far as Kansas he found only a few villages. His Indian guide confessed he lured the army on to the plains to die, and Coronado had him strangled. The expedition turned back. After a bleak winter along the Rio Grande the broken army went back to Mexico empty handed.

Colonizers and Missionaries

Nearly 60 years now passed before Spaniards came to New Mexico to stay. In 1581 explorers began prospecting for silver in the land of the Pueblos. Their failures foreshadowed a truth that determined much of Spanish New Mexico's history: that province held neither golden cities nor ready riches. But the fact that settlers could farm and herd there focused the joint strategies of Cross and Crown: Pueblo Indians could be converted and their lands colonized. Don Juan de Oñate was first to pursue this mixed objective, in 1598. Taking settlers, livestock, and 10 Franciscans he marched north to claim for Spain the land across the Rio Grande. Right away he assigned a friar to Pecos, richest and most powerful New Mexico pueblo. The new religion got off to a shaky start. After episodes of idol-smashing provoked Indian resentment, the Franciscans sent veteran missionary Fray Andrés Juárez to Pecos in 1621 as healer and builder. Under his direction the Pecos built an adobe church south of the pueblo, the most imposing of New Mexico’s mission churches.

War and Re-Conquest Decades of Spanish demands and Indian resentments climaxed in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Indians in scattered pueblos united to drive the Spaniards back to Mexico. At Pecos loyal Indians warned the local priest, but most followed a tribal elder in revolt. They killed the priest, destroyed the church, desecrated symbols of the Catholic Church, and, symbolizing the discontent, built a forbidden kiva in mission’s convento itself. One of the most often desecrated symbols were the crosses, both those used in the churches as well as those marking graves. Twelve years later, led by Diego de Vargas, the Spaniards came back to their lost province, peacefully in some places but with the sword in others.

The Katchina Stone Cross

Coronado's group spent the winter of 1540 - 1541 at the Pecos Pueblo very near the town of Pecos New Mexico in the upper Pecos River valley. During this time many of the soldiers and settlers died not being able to withstand the winter. It is documented in the writings from the expedition that those who died were buried in graves each marked with a stone cross. As a result of the revolt in 1680 the Indians desecrated many crosses including those that marked graves. The cross offered here was found in the Pecos Valley of New Mexico east of Santa Fe, the same area Coronado wintered in 1540 and is consistent in form and size with known Conquistador grave markers. It measures 38.1cm tall, 19cm wide and 5.1cm thick and exhibits significant age and mineral deposits on the reverse. As a result of the desecration of the cross, there is a deep inverted triangle inscribed above the cross member forming the face of the Katchina. Attached just below this first triangle is a second inverted, more shallow triangle, which forms the breast of the Katchina. Descending from the second triangle is a vertical inscribed line which extends to the bottom edge. The two horizontal extensions of the cross each exhibit a deep grove which forms the arms of the Katchina. In addition the upper triangle forms the face and has indentations which form the eyes, nose and mouth - these are clearly evident in the photographs. Both triangles have an ancient olive-green paint which was applied most likely to set off the body of the Katchina. Overall the front of the cross has significant "hand patina" which could only have formed over a long, extended time thus attesting to the age of the piece. During all periods excluding the Pueblo Revolt years Catholic icons were held in high esteem and would not have been desecrated or altered in any way by the Indians. This is without question a historically important piece from the now famous time period known as The Pueblo Revolt.

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