Galerie Ariana
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1980 item #1118857 (stock #BK01)
Galerie Ariana
$1,800.00
In Bhutan, the Land of the Thunder Dragon (Dzongkha), the time spent in embroidering textiles is considerable and can involve as much as a year for certain ceremonial textiles such as this one with a black background, called a "napsham". Surprisingly, the intricacy of the woven design elements that closely resemble embroidery is created on looms, mostly backstrap looms. This textile measures 97 x 243 cm including the fringes and is embroidered in cotton yarn on a raw silk ground. Condition is near perfect albeit with some slight fading. Mid to late 20th century.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1980 item #1179725 (stock #BC001)
Galerie Ariana
$500.00
A king-sized cotton duvet cover from Nepal, measuring 111 x 74½" inches (43.7 x 29.3 cm) in purple, red and green. The viúvavajra ("crossed vajra") and chevron motifs are depicted in wool thread in chain stitch. Condition: Excellent. The vajra (meaning diamond or thunderbolt) is believed to represent firmness of spirit and spiritual power and is displayed in the national emblem of Bhutan.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1980 item #1179718 (stock #NW01)
Galerie Ariana
$500.00
A pair of hand-carved window frames from Bhaktapur, an ancient Newar city in the Kathmandu Valley. They measure 44 x 45.5 cm and are dated to the late 20th century. Woodwork has been part of Nepal’s traditional architecture and wood carvings have graced temples, monasteries, residential homes and palaces since the twelfth century, although the earliest surviving temple decorated with wood carvings, bears the date 1396. Another traditional architectural site, which is believed to have been built as a shelter for travellers in Kathmandu that still stands, was believed to date back to before 1143 but there is no evidence of its true date. In fact, the history of woodcarving in Nepal is older than that. Woodcarving in Nepal is an excellent example of Newari art. The Newari language comprises of a rich vocabulary of wood carving terms. Each component forms a part of a traditional pattern. Each detail of the craft has a name. The decorative work has to be very precise so that the countless pieces used to make up the pattern fit perfectly, because no glue or nails are used. Historic sources name a kind of wood called Dhusi or Chasi, meaning in Newari "as strong as a tiger". Today mainly agarth, chapa & sal wood is used, as there is plenty in and around the valley. Wood has been the traditional building material in the Valley not only used to form the heavy framework, which forms the essential part of the structure but beams, struts, pillars and roof supports. All the available wood surfaces on the buildings, including doors, windows, cornices, lintels and brackets are formed and carved into decorative patterns of geometrical, floral, animal and human forms.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1980 item #1144025 (stock #TB01)
Galerie Ariana
$350.00
This Tibetan wool sash measures 12.7 cm x 340.4 cm in length including the silky fringes. The tigma (cross) motif is an ancient good luck charm among Tibetans and here it is depicted in a discontinuous weft pattern design. These sashes are traditionally worn to secure the traditional Tibetan attire called a chuba. The high lustre of the wool is attributed to the high lanolin content of the goat wool in the high altitude regions of the Tibetan plateau. The last photo shows a typical loom on which these sashes are woven. Condition: Excellent. Mid to late 20th century.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1980 item #1147777 (stock #TB02)
Galerie Ariana
$300.00
Measuring 8 x 116 inches (20.3 x 294.6 cm) including the braided fringes, this woven wool sash from Tibet is in excellent condition. The sash is a dark bergundy with indigo stripes and orange thread sewn along the edges to prevent fraying. Estimated age: mid to late 20th century. These sashes are called kaabo and are traditionally used to tie and secure the national attire called chuba for women, lokpa for men (see enlargement #5, courtesy of Thomas Laird and Peter Matthiessen, East of Lo Manthang © 1995). The high lustre of the wool is attributed to the high lanolin content of the goat wool in the high altitude regions of the Tibetan plateau. The last enlargement is a photo by Heinrich Harrer depicting a traditional loom on which these sashes are woven (Ladakh, © 1988).
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1980 item #1146298 (stock #TB09)
Galerie Ariana
$300.00
A woven wool sash from Tibet, circa mid to late 20th century. Measuring 15.3 x 300 cm including the fringes, it is in overall good condition, but with some fraying. These sashes are used by Tibetans to tie their traditional attire (chuba for women, lokpa for men) and also to secure knives, bundles etc. Enlargement #6 shows the use of these sashes in traditional Tibetan nomadic culture (© 1995 East of Lo Manthang by Peter Matthiessen and Thomas Laird).
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1980 item #1147785 (stock #TB017)
Galerie Ariana
$200.00
This Tibetan woven wool sash from the mid to late 20th century measures 5½ x 104 inches (14 x 264.2 cm) including the braided fringes and is in excellent condition. These sashes are used by Tibetans to tie their traditional apron attire (chuba for women, lokpa for men) and also to secure knives, bundles etc. The luster of these wool belts is derived from the high lanolin content to be found in the hairs of high-altitude goats living in the Himalayan range from which these belts are woven. Enlargement #12 shows the use of these sashes in traditional Tibetan nomadic culture (© 1995 East of Lo Manthang by Peter Matthiessen and Thomas Laird). These sashes are known as "kaabo" among the Tibetans and are carefully woven on backstrap looms.