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A Bizen Ichirinzashi Vase– by TOKO -Showa

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Directory: Vintage Arts: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Stoneware: Pre 1980: item # 1128949

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Ichiban Japanese & Oriental Antiques
Post Office Box 395
Marion, CT 06444-0395
203.272.7392

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$295.00

A Bizen Ichirinzashi Vase– by TOKO -Showa
This handsome bottle shaped vase is called a Ichirinzashi vase in Japanese – it literally means a vase made for one flower. This one measures 10 ¼” tall and is 3 ¾” diameter at its widest. It has the characteristic yellowish green overglaze with drips and spots – all over an unglazed reddish brown clay body. The vase has a stamped signature on the base that has been translated as “Tōko”. The vase is in excellent condition with no chips, cracks or restorations. We date it to the late Showa period, circa 1930s-1970s.

Konishi Tōko 1 (1899-1954), studied pottery making under his grandfather Eimi Tōraku who was a master potter of the early Meiji period. Konishi Tōko 1 established his kiln in 1926 (Showa 1). His second daughter (the current master) succeeded as Konishi Tōko II in Showa 54 (1979).

Bizen ware (Bizen-yaki) is a type of Japanese pottery most identifiable by its iron-like hardness, reddish brown color and markings resulting from wood-burning kiln firing. Bizen is named after the village of Imbe in Okayama prefecture, formerly known as Bizen province. This artwork is Japan's oldest pottery making technique, introduced in the Heian period. Bizen is one of the six remaining kilns of medieval Japan.

Bizen clay bodies have a high iron content and, traditionally, much organic matter that is unreceptive to glazing. The clay can take many forms. The surface treatments of Bizen wares are entirely dependent on yohen, or "kiln effects." Pine ash produces goma, or "sesame seed" glaze spotting. Rice straw wrapped around pieces creates red and brown scorch marks. The placement of pieces in a kiln causes them to be fired under different conditions, with a variety of different results. Considering that one clay body and type of firing is used, the variety of results is remarkable.



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