Japanese Antiques by Ichiban Oriental and Asian Art

A Bizen Pottery Okimono of Jurojin, w/Tomobako, Meiji

A Bizen Pottery Okimono of Jurojin, w/Tomobako, Meiji


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Stoneware: Pre 1900: Item # 1228489

Please refer to our stock # 58 when inquiring.
 $250.00 
This is a nicely detailed small figure of JUROJIN dating from the Meiji period, circa 1880s. It is in excellent condition with no cracks, chips or other issues. It measures 4.1" high by 3.3" wide by 2.9" deep and comes with its own tomobako (box). The okimono weighs 260 grams (9.7 oz) and the box another 150 grams (5.3 oz). Jurojin is a symbol of a long life/ longevity. In Japan, Jurōjin, also known as Gama, is one of the Seven Gods of Fortune or Shichifukujin, according to Taoist beliefs. Jurōjin is often identified with Fukurokuju, another of the Several Gods of Fortune. In some accounts, the two are said to inhabit the same body. As such, the two are often confused.

Here the figure is depicted as an old man of slight stature, and by tradition seated in contemplaion. He is depicted with a long white beard and often a very tall, bald head. He has a scroll in his hand, on which is written the lifespan of all living things. The scroll is sometimes identified as a Buddhist sutra. Often, Jurojin is shown in a standing position holding a staff in one hand and the scroll in the other. He is also usually accompanied by a deer. This depiction shows him resting from his travels - who knows where the deer might be at this point.