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Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art (105)

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Tenshitsu Sochiku (1605-1667) - Zen landscape

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1700   item# 1265140

Tenshitsu Sochiku (1605-1667) - Zen landscape
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



 

A Zen landscape by Tenshitsu Sochiku (1605-1667). Abott #190 of Daitoku-ji. The inscription reads; 'Among clusters of lakes and mountains, there are thousands of old Buddhas; Among the layers of trees in the mist, there is one pagoda. The splendor of flowers points out the real teaching; Living close to the earth reveals the ultimate.' Signed Randoji Ichinyo, Tenshitsu's pen name. The painting itself illustrates the sentiments expressed in the inscription. The intuition that the earth and its glories form the body of Buddha is a central theme of Zen Art. Unlike most of the Daitoku-ji abbots who were classically trained in calligraphy and painting, Tenshitsu's brushwork is more roughhewn and natural, perfect for this Zenga. Pieces by Tenshitsu are rare. Translation and commentary by John Stevens. The painting is contained within an annotated Edo period storage box. It is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity by Kohitsu Ryosen (1741-1783), the son of Kohitsu Ryoen. Ryosen was the 8th generational head of the Kohitsu family. Members of the family were the foremost appraisers of calligraphy throughout the Edo period. Painted with ink on paper the work is in very good condition. It has just been remounted utilizing the previous mounting. The image measures 11'' by 10.5'' (27.5 by 27 cm). The scroll measures 44'' by 15'' (113 by 38 cm).


Yamaguchi Reiki (1894-1979) - Crane screens

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1265133

Yamaguchi Reiki (1894-1979) - Crane screens
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



 

A pair of nihonga screens dating to the Taisho period, circa 1920. A group of cranes presumably engaged in a courtship dance. The Japanese crane, a most auspicious symbol, has been of great importance in Japanese art and culture since ancient times. It is regarded as a symbol of good fortune and longevity due to its fabled lifespan, and also represents fidelity as the birds are known to mate for life. Here the artist's representation of the crane relies strongly on a foundation of shasei, or sketching from life. His unpretentious ink and gofun brushwork is rich in descriptive quality revealing the artist's skill with the brush. Painted on silk which has been covered with gold leaf, the artist has used ink, color and gofun. The screens are in good, original condition. They are still kept within their original signed and sealed wooden storage box. Each screen measures 148'' across and stands 67'' high (375 by 170 cm). The screens are signed and sealed Shosai. Shosai is the early art name of Yamaguchi Reiki (1894-1979). The last reference we can find for him using Shosai was in 1918. Reiki is the older brother of the painter Yamaguchi Kayo. Reiki studied under Kikuchi Hobun and Kikuchi Keigetsu and specialized in bird and flower paintings. In 1964 he was commissioned to paint sliding doors at the Kyoto Imperial Palace. He was a regular participant at the national exhibitions, exhibiting on 28 occasions between 1912 and 1958.


Kawabata Gyokusho (1842-1913) - Basho nehanzu

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1264733

Kawabata Gyokusho (1842-1913) - Basho nehanzu
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



$2800 

A nehanzu (nirvana painting) painted in the very last years of Kawabata Gyokusho's life, 1911 or 1912. Traditional nirvana paintings depict the death of the historical Buddha and his entrance into a state of perfect peace. In this highly unusual work Gyokusho depicts the death of Matsuo Basho (1644-1694) in place of Buddha. Similarly surrounded by mourners including his disciples, gods, lay people and animals, Buddha's mother descending from the clouds a notable absence. The work is contained within its original signed, sealed, dated and titled storage box. This box then sits within a secondary lacquered box. Painted on silk with ink the painting has recently been remounted and is in very good condition. The image measures 29'' by 12'' (73 by 31 cm). The scroll measures 62'' by 16.5'' (156 by 42 cm). Kawabata Gyokusho (1842-1913). Born in Kyoto the son of a lacquer artisan. At the age of ten he began studying Maruyama painting under Nakajima Raisho. He became a professor at the Tokyo University of Fine Arts in 1888, being invited to paint the doors of the Tokyo Imperial Palace in the same year.


Meiji period - ink carp scroll

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1264480

Meiji period - ink carp scroll
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



$5800 

A very large later Meiji period (circa 1900) ink painting of carp or koi. Painted on silk with soft washes of ink the field has exceptional depth and the fish a tangible weightiness. The scroll is original in all respects and displays very well. It is in good overall condition. The image measures 63'' by 33'' (161 by 85 cm). The scroll measures 87'' by 39'' (220 by 100 cm). Both the signature and seal read Baiho. We have been unable to uncover the artist's identity.


Hatta Koyo (1882-1944) - Taisho summer screen

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1264478

Hatta Koyo (1882-1944) - Taisho summer screen
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



 

A two-fold screen from the late Taisho or early Showa periods, circa 1930. A dynamic summer scene of a river cascading through a tight ravine; playground for a pair of wagtails. The screen stands 67'' high and measures 74'' across (171 by 188 cm). The screen is in good, original condition and displays very well. It has been painted on paper with ink, pigment and gofun. It is the work of Hatta Koyo (1882-1944). Born in Kyoto he originally studied under Nakajima Yusho and then moved to Takeuchi Seiho when he was 14 years old. In 1907 he won a prize at the first ever national Bunten exhibition. He became a regular exhibitor from there; Bunten 2, 3, 7, 11, 12. Teiten 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15.


Shosenin ((1823-1880) - Gibbons reaching for the moon

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1263653

Shosenin ((1823-1880) - Gibbons reaching for the moon
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



SOLD 

Infused with great character and hanging precariously from a spindly branch, this group of gibbons have formed a chain in a futile effort to capture the moon's reflection. Gibbons reaching for the moon itself or its reflection alludes to a desire to possess that which cannot be used or the desire to obtain that which cannot be held. Zen Buddhism and gibbon painting in Japan are closely linked and the majority of Japanese gibbon paintings depict zen themes satirizing human folly. Painted with ink on paper the work is in very good condition. Light creasing is present. The image measures 50'' by 11'' (128 by 27.5 cm). The scroll measures 80'' by 12.5'' (203 by 32 cm). Kano Shosenin Tadanobu (1823-1880). Son of Kano Seisenin Osanobu (1796-1846). Shosenin was the 10th generational head of the Kobiki-cho Kano school.


Taisho period bijin

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1262815

Taisho period bijin
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



$2100 

A very large painting of a beauty or bijin from the Taisho period, circa 1915/20. The image measures 74'' by 32'' (187 by 82 cm). The scroll measures 90'' by 40'' (229 by 101 cm). Painted on silk with ink, pigment and gofun the painting is in very good condition. All original. Slight losses of gofun are present on the fingers. The work is signed and sealed though the artist remains unidentified. The signatures reads Tojo, the seal reads Seizan.


Kano Eigaku (1790-1867) - Silver carp screen pair

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1262732

Kano Eigaku (1790-1867) - Silver carp screen pair
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



$5400 

A pair of late Edo period screens by Kano Eigaku depicting carp or koi swimming amongst aquatic plants. Ink on silver leaf. The pair have recently been completely remounted. Stunning Edo period brocade has been used to frame them. At some stage the left screen has lost two of its panels, being converted into a four fold screen. The silver leaf has oxidized and darkened quite noticeably. The six-fold screen stands 53'' high and measures 140'' across (134 cm by 356 cm). The four fold screen stands 53'' high and measures 94'' across (134 cm by 239 cm). Kano Eigaku (1790-1867) was the adopted son of Kano Eishun and the ninth generational head of the Kyoto Kano school whose lineage included artists such as Eitoku, Sanraku and Sansetsu. Eigaku was held in very high esteem and was commissioned to paint sliding doors in the Kyoto Imperial Palace during its last rebuilding in 1855. A solo exhibition of his works was held at the Hikone Castle Musuem in October 2002. He is credited with having revived the flagging fortunes of the once dominant Kano school. He excelled in strong compositions and masterful brushwork, his works becoming popular amongst all classes.


Nomura Totsusai (1831-1864) - Maruyama tiger

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1256098

Nomura Totsusai (1831-1864) - Maruyama tiger
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



 

A six-fold screen from the very late Edo period, mid 19th century. A highly spirited Maruyama school tiger from an artist known for his paintings of large, fierce beasts. Nomura Totsusai (1831-1864) died at a very young age. A Kyoto artist, he studied under Maruyama Oritsu (1817-1875). Given name Nomura Satoshi. Painted on paper with ink and color. Gold flecks highlight the scene. It has undergone restoration at some stage during its life. At that time quite a lot of holes caused by insects were attended too. These are generally restricted to the extreme panels of the screen and around the hinges. They are a mild distraction but have been professionally fixed. The screen retains its integrity. The screen measures 67'' by 148'' (171 by 377 cm).


Matsumura Kando - Bao Feng poetry screen

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1255545

Matsumura Kando - Bao Feng poetry screen
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zen-zen0
075-771-9190



 

A six-fold calligraphy screen by the Kyoto writer and calligrapher Matsumura Kando. Broad, confident brush-strokes in rich sumi ink on silver leaf combine for a stunning decorative effect. This one is a poem by the Chinese artist Bao Feng (723-790): ''In the court, hundreds of warblers chirp, their wings woven together like brocade, while thousands of willows display their yellow green branches.'' (Chinese character translations available). Both of the screens are signed and sealed on their left sides, so likely they were not specifically made to be viewed as a pair and are thus being sold separately. Perhaps from a set of four or more. Perhaps made for display in two different sections of a building. They were made and painted at the same time, with the same materials and very likely for the same purpose. Perhaps a commemorative ceremony. The screen stands 67'' high and measures 148'' across (171 cm by 376 cm). It is in very good, original condition. Kando was well known as a classical literature (kobun) writer and calligrapher in the Meiji period though his exact dates are unknown. From Kyoto, he is perhaps most famous for writing the inscription which is carved into the commemorative stone honoring Imao Keinen upon completion of the dragon which he had painted on the ceiling of the newly reconstructed Dharma lecture hall in 1909. He used many different art names through his career, though the Nanzenji stone is signed Kando in the same fashion as this screen. The materials used in the construction of the screen also indicate a similar late Meiji period date. Other art names he used were Shisho, Hyakujyudo, Rokuroku-sanjin, Rokuroku-gakujin and Kikyo. The signature on this screen reads Kando Takumi. Takumi is his given name and is always used in his signatures in combination with his art names. The top seal reads Shirando, the lower seal Shin Takumi.

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