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Taisho period bijin

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1262815

Taisho period bijin
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075-771-9190



$2100 

A very large painting of a beauty or bijin from the Taisho period, circa 1915/20. The image measures 74'' by 32'' (187 by 82 cm). The scroll measures 90'' by 40'' (229 by 101 cm). Painted on silk with ink, pigment and gofun the painting is in very good condition. All original. Slight losses of gofun are present on the fingers. The work is signed and sealed though the artist remains unidentified. The signatures reads Tojo, the seal reads Seizan.


Kano Eigaku (1790-1867) - Silver carp screen pair

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1262732

Kano Eigaku (1790-1867) - Silver carp screen pair
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075-771-9190



$5400 

A pair of late Edo period screens by Kano Eigaku depicting carp or koi swimming amongst aquatic plants. Ink on silver leaf. The pair have recently been completely remounted. Stunning Edo period brocade has been used to frame them. At some stage the left screen has lost two of its panels, being converted into a four fold screen. The silver leaf has oxidized and darkened quite noticeably. The six-fold screen stands 53'' high and measures 140'' across (134 cm by 356 cm). The four fold screen stands 53'' high and measures 94'' across (134 cm by 239 cm). Kano Eigaku (1790-1867) was the adopted son of Kano Eishun and the ninth generational head of the Kyoto Kano school whose lineage included artists such as Eitoku, Sanraku and Sansetsu. Eigaku was held in very high esteem and was commissioned to paint sliding doors in the Kyoto Imperial Palace during its last rebuilding in 1855. A solo exhibition of his works was held at the Hikone Castle Musuem in October 2002. He is credited with having revived the flagging fortunes of the once dominant Kano school. He excelled in strong compositions and masterful brushwork, his works becoming popular amongst all classes.


Nomura Totsusai (1831-1864) - Maruyama tiger

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1256098

Nomura Totsusai (1831-1864) - Maruyama tiger
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075-771-9190



 

A six-fold screen from the very late Edo period, mid 19th century. A highly spirited Maruyama school tiger from an artist known for his paintings of large, fierce beasts. Nomura Totsusai (1831-1864) died at a very young age. A Kyoto artist, he studied under Maruyama Oritsu (1817-1875). Given name Nomura Satoshi. Painted on paper with ink and color. Gold flecks highlight the scene. It has undergone restoration at some stage during its life. At that time quite a lot of holes caused by insects were attended too. These are generally restricted to the extreme panels of the screen and around the hinges. They are a mild distraction but have been professionally fixed. The screen retains its integrity. The screen measures 67'' by 148'' (171 by 377 cm).


18th c. - Chinese Meiren

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Chinese: Paintings: Pre 1800   item# 1255673

18th c. - Chinese Meiren
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075-771-9190



 

A mildly erotic Chinese painting of a beautiful woman or 'Meiren'. Dating to the second half of the 18th century, the female figure is highly expressive and has a striking presence. She is completely self-absorbed and carries a clear sense of inner life. Such attributes flourished in the 18th century and quickly disappeared. It is likely that such artists were based in the northern Chinese cities and professional urban studio painters.* For a woman to be so absorbed in her quiet and scholarly pursuit might seem to indicate the painting is reserved in nature, though the exquisite beauty of her face and most of all the openness with which the artist presents her to our gaze render her far more captivating. Originally the work would have been unsigned, the spurious seal and signature of Gu Luo being clumsily and unnecessarily added at a later date. Gu Luo was an early 19th century master who completely toned down the evocative power of the genre, rendering it quite conventionalized and suitable for collectors of the time to own and enjoy publicly. Such spurious attributions are common within the Chinese meiren genre, which has been little understood until recent times. * Pictures for Use and Pleasure: Vernacular Painting in High Qing China. James Cahill. University of California Press, 2010. Painted on silk with ink and color the work is in reasonable condition. There are some stains presents along with a couple of old breaks in the silk. It has recently been mounted in Japan and displays very well. The image measures 9.5'' by 10.5'' (24 by 27 cm). The scroll measures 52'' by 18'' (133 by 45 cm).


Matsumura Kando - Bao Feng poetry screen

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1255545

Matsumura Kando - Bao Feng poetry screen
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075-771-9190



 

A six-fold calligraphy screen by the Kyoto writer and calligrapher Matsumura Kando. Broad, confident brush-strokes in rich sumi ink on silver leaf combine for a stunning decorative effect. This one is a poem by the Chinese artist Bao Feng (723-790): ''In the court, hundreds of warblers chirp, their wings woven together like brocade, while thousands of willows display their yellow green branches.'' (Chinese character translations available). Both of the screens are signed and sealed on their left sides, so likely they were not specifically made to be viewed as a pair and are thus being sold separately. Perhaps from a set of four or more. Perhaps made for display in two different sections of a building. They were made and painted at the same time, with the same materials and very likely for the same purpose. Perhaps a commemorative ceremony. The screen stands 67'' high and measures 148'' across (171 cm by 376 cm). It is in very good, original condition. Kando was well known as a classical literature (kobun) writer and calligrapher in the Meiji period though his exact dates are unknown. From Kyoto, he is perhaps most famous for writing the inscription which is carved into the commemorative stone honoring Imao Keinen upon completion of the dragon which he had painted on the ceiling of the newly reconstructed Dharma lecture hall in 1909. He used many different art names through his career, though the Nanzenji stone is signed Kando in the same fashion as this screen. The materials used in the construction of the screen also indicate a similar late Meiji period date. Other art names he used were Shisho, Hyakujyudo, Rokuroku-sanjin, Rokuroku-gakujin and Kikyo. The signature on this screen reads Kando Takumi. Takumi is his given name and is always used in his signatures in combination with his art names. The top seal reads Shirando, the lower seal Shin Takumi.


Matsumura Kando - silver poetry screen

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1255543

Matsumura Kando - silver poetry screen
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075-771-9190



 

A six-fold calligraphy screen by the Kyoto writer and calligrapher Matsumura Kando. Broad, confident brush-strokes in rich sumi ink on silver leaf combine for a stunning decorative effect. This poem was likely written by an ancient Chinese poet though we haven't identified it yet: ''Thick dewdrops form fresh and pure, As wind blows through the garden full of golden plants fragrant and verdant.'' (Chinese character translations available). Both of the screens are signed and sealed on their left sides, so likely they were not specifically made to be viewed as a pair and are thus being sold separately. Perhaps from a set of four or more. Perhaps made for display in two different sections of a building. They were made and painted at the same time, with the same materials and very likely for the same purpose. Perhaps a commemorative ceremony. The screen stands 67'' high and measures 148'' across (171 cm by 376 cm). It is in very good, original condition. Kando was well known as a classical literature (kobun) writer and calligrapher in the Meiji period though his exact dates are unknown. From Kyoto, he is perhaps most famous for writing the inscription which is carved into the commemorative stone honoring Imao Keinen upon completion of the dragon which he had painted on the ceiling of the newly reconstructed Dharma lecture hall in 1909. He used many different art names through his career, though the Nanzenji stone is signed Kando in the same fashion as this screen. The materials used in the construction of the screen also indicate a similar late Meiji period date. Other art names he used were Shisho, Hyakujyudo, Rokuroku-sanjin, Rokuroku-gakujin and Kikyo. The signature on this screen reads Kando Takumi. Takumi is his given name and is always used in his signatures in combination with his art names. The top seal reads Shirando, the lower seal Shin Takumi.


17c - Tethered horse & cherry blossoms

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1700   item# 1254999

17c - Tethered horse & cherry blossoms
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075-771-9190



 

In China since ancient times images of fine horses have symbolized military power and authority. Most commonly shown tethered to trees and casually grazing they are thought to intimate times when the empire was at peace. In Japan, horses tethered in stables became a popular motif during the Muromachi era, though perhaps connoting a samurai's pride at his fine team of horses. In this unique Japanese painting a horse is tethered to a blooming cherry tree in full battle regalia, its master noticeably absent. In the empty space a poem has been inscribed which has so far eluded our attempts at translation. Undoubtably it would shed light on the artist's intentions; perhaps referencing the samurai's fleeting life to the blossoms on a cherry tree. Both the painter and the poet/calligrapher remain anonymous. The painting dates to the 17th century. Painted on paper with ink, color and gofun. It is in fair condition. It has undergone many repairs over its lifetime which have basically dealt with paper losses. The work has also been somewhat reduced in size which has interfered with the artist's signature and seal. The mounting is quite new and the work displays well. The image measures 14'' by 20'' (35 by 50 cm). The scroll measures 53.5'' by 25'' (136 by 64 cm).


Watanabe Shusen (1736-1824) - Nagasaki tiger

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1253937

Watanabe Shusen (1736-1824) - Nagasaki tiger
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075-771-9190



 

A striking ink tiger by the Nagasaki School artist Watanabe Shusen (1736-1824). Famed for his depictions of tigers, he is the seventh head of the Nagasaki School of Art founded by Watanabe Shuseki (1639-1707). Shuseki studied directly under the Chinese priest So Itsuzen who arrived in Nagasaki in 1645. Painted with ink on paper the work is in good to very good condition. It has just been remounted using the existing brocade. One repair to the paper has been made through the upper seal. The image measures 50'' by 11'' (127 by 28 cm). The scroll measures 74.5'' by 14'' (189 by 35 cm).


Yamada Dosetsu (fl. 1830-1844) - Russian hound

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1253935

Yamada Dosetsu (fl. 1830-1844) - Russian hound
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075-771-9190



 

The dog pictured is a Russian hound or perhaps a saluki. Although by an artist of the Kano school the work shows strong Nagasaki or Nanpin school influences; the prominent foreground positioning of the subject, extreme detail, rich decorative coloring and also the exotic nature of the subject itself. The basis for this style was the particular type of Ming dynasty bird and flower painting brought from China to Japan in the 18th century by Shen Nanpin (Shen Quan). Exotic western animals were first brought to Japan aboard the Portuguese black ships during the 16th century and are commonly depicted in folding screens of the era though far less realistically than in this case. The model for this hound would have been based on a painting or sketch by a Chinese artist brought in to the port of Nagasaki or even a European copperplate engraving and etching. Painted with ink and pigments on silk the work is in good condition. Some pigment losses and small marks are visible. It presents very nicely with Edo period brocade. The image measures 39'' by 14'' (100 by 35 cm). The scroll measures 74'' by 17'' (184 by 44 cm). Yamada Dosetsu (fl. 1830-1844). The signature reads Dosetsu Yoshitatsu. Dosetsu's real name is Yoshitatsu Dosetsu. He lived in Edo and was a student of Kano Torin Yoshinobu (1781-1820). Torin headed the Saruyamachi branch of the Kano school.


Hanabusa Itcho (1652-1724) - Tengu

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1800   item# 1253922

Hanabusa Itcho (1652-1724) - Tengu
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A painting by Hanabusa Itcho (1652-1724) depicting Tengu training in swordsmanship on the branches of a cedar tree. Sojobo, the king of tengu sits atop the tree instructing his disciples. Sojobo lives on Mount Kurama in the north of Kyoto. It is along the path between Kurama and Kibune that the tengu are believed to train. The inscription was added at a later date and basically means: ''Training so hard on a snowy night, we will need the maidens of Kibune Shrine to tend our injuries.'' Kibune shrine in known as the place to go for healing painful injuries. The calligrapher is unknown to us though a small letter accompanies the painting which refers to the inscription. It is beyond our capabilities to translate it though it was written in 1727 and refers to events that occurred in 1722. Painted with ink and color on paper the work is in very good condition. It is beautifully framed with Edo period brocade. The image measures 35'' by 12.5'' (89 by 31.5 cm). The scroll measures 66'' by 13'' (167 by 33 cm).

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