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Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings (100)

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17c. - Tale of Genji screen

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1700   item# 1232243

17c. - Tale of Genji screen
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This 17th century screen displays a selection of scenes from the 11th century novel 'The tale of Genji' by Murasaki Shikibu. Outstanding features of this particular screen include the unusually large figures, the brilliant coloring of their kimono and the surrounding sliding doors and also the remarkable depth and resonance of the gold leaf. The sweeping, graceful composition takes us from the top right scene to Genji observing the game of Go, down along the raised walkway and finally along to the musical scene in the lower center. It has been painted with ink, color and gofun on gold leaf. The screen is in good condition for its age. It has undergone past restorations, though they have always been handled appropriately. Presently the screen is ready for display although the hinges have become a little weak. The screen stands 67'' high and measures 148'' across (170 by 377 cm).


Igarashi Katei (1780-1850) - Pair of dragon screens

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1231020

Igarashi Katei (1780-1850) - Pair of dragon screens
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A set of twelve dragon paintings by Igarashi Katei mounted on a pair of six-fold screens. They were painted in the year of the golden rat which is the 11th year of the Tenpo era, 1840. In Japan the dragon is closely associated with water, and as is the case here, is often shown emerging from vapor and clouds to produce rain. Dragons are generally considered to be aquatic, living in lakes, rivers and the sea. Dragons were also incorporated in Buddhist thought and iconography as a protector of Buddhist law. It is quite unusual to find such a grouping of dragon paintings. Perhaps they were commissioned by a temple as protective images. Rythmical and entrancing when viewed as a whole, skillful and intimate when viewed individually. The images are painted with ink on paper with gold fleck highlights. The paintings are in good overall condition. Some discoloration around the edges is present. The images are mounted on period screens of fair quality, hand-beaten gold leaf surrounded by silk brocade. Each screen measures 69'' by 141'' (175 cm by 358 cm). Each image measures 53'' by 21'' (136 cm by 54 cm). Igarashi Katei (1780-1850), originally from Niigata, was the son of the head priest of Yahata shrine. Katei's birth name is Igarashi Sagami. When Kano Baisho (who attained the rank of Hokyo) moved to Niigata Katei became his student. Katei later moved to Kyoto and studied under Kishi Ganku. At the age of 33 Katei followed his father and became a priest at a shrine. He became particularly popular as an artist from the age of 35, and in a list of Japanese artists published in 1836 Katei held the highest ranking of the Niigata area.


c.1700 - Waterfowl screen pair

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1800   item# 1230193

c.1700 - Waterfowl screen pair
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This unique pair of screens are closely connected to falcon screens and horses in their stable screens, both of which have special significance for the major Shogunal/samurai pastime of falconry. This present pair would have been understood in its time as an image representing the bountiful waterfowl available in the prime hunting grounds. Numerous species of ducks, mallards, teals and even a solitary gull have been described with minute and wondrous detail. Even if the artist did not actually observe every species in the screens, he would have consulted sketches from life or manuals based on sketches of the various birds to satisfy his predilection for realism. The screens date to the late 17th or early 18th centuries, circa 1700. The scenes have been painted with ink, color and gofun on paper. The clouds have been formed with sprinkled flecks of cut gold leaf. The sand bar on the left screen utilizes the moriage technique of raised gofun. The screens have very recently undergone a high level remounting and restoration and display beautifully. Each screen stands 67 inches high and measures 148 inches across (170 by 376 cm). The left screen bears a seal reading either Dotoku or Dosen. We haven't been able to uncover any further information.


c.1700 - Waterfowl screen pair

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1800   item# 1230192

c.1700 - Waterfowl screen pair
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This unique pair of screens are closely connected to falcon screens and horses in their stable screens, both of which have special significance for the major Shogunal/samurai pastime of falconry. This present pair would have been understood in its time as an image representing the bountiful waterfowl available in the prime hunting grounds. Numerous species of ducks, mallards, teals and even a solitary gull have been described with minute and wondrous detail. Even if the artist did not actually observe every species in the screens, he would have consulted sketches from life or manuals based on sketches of the various birds to satisfy his predilection for realism. The screens date to the late 17th or early 18th centuries, circa 1700. The scenes have been painted with ink, color and gofun on paper. The clouds have been formed with sprinkled flecks of cut gold leaf. The sand bar on the left screen utilizes the moriage technique of raised gofun. The screens have very recently undergone a high level remounting and restoration and display beautifully. Each screen stands 67 inches high and measures 148 inches across. The left screen bears a seal reading either Dotoku or Dosen. We haven't been able to uncover any further information.


Kano Ujinobu (1616-1669) - Chinese scholars

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1700   item# 1225455

Kano Ujinobu (1616-1669) - Chinese scholars
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A mid 17th century screen depicting a pair of Chinese scholars riding donkeys; perhaps Lin Bu (Lin Hejing) the reclusive Chinese poet of the Song Dynasty and the calligrapher Zhang Zhi. The pair are known to have been depicted riding donkeys along the West Lake causeway in Japanese art of the 17th century. Painted with ink and pigment on gold leaf the screen is in good condition and presents very well. The screen stands 64.5'' high and measures 144'' across (164 by 366 cm). Kano Ujinobu, Daigaku (1616-1669). Son of Kano Soshin (1568-1620) who studied under his father Kano Shoei (1519-1592). Ujinobu was the third-generation head of the Tsukiji Odawaracho branch of the Kano school. Served the Shogunate as Omote Eshi. Omote Eshi were the branch families and disciples of the higher-ranking Oku Eshi. There were four main Oku Eshi branches and fifteen Omote Eshi branches including the Tsukiji Odawaracho.


Suigan Shoken (1701-1769) - Hotei

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1700   item# 1222662

Suigan Shoken (1701-1769) - Hotei
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A ink brushed Hotei with inscription by the Zen priest Suigan Shoken (1701-1769). The inscription reads ''One shoulder exposed, feet stretched out, perfectly content, this Hotei; Moonlight from above pierces his guts!* (*Meaning '' Enlightenment pervades his being''). Brushed with ink on paper the work is in reasonably good condition and presents very well. The image measures 34'' by 10'' (86 by 26 cm). The scroll measures 66'' by 11'' (167 by 28 cm). Suigan Shoken was Abbot #217 of Tenryu-ji. Suigan was a well known poet, calligrapher, and tea master. The artist is unknown, perhaps a Kano painter.


Konoe Nobutada (1565-1614) - Side view Daruma

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1700   item# 1222660

Konoe Nobutada (1565-1614) - Side view Daruma
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Side view Daruma by Konoe Nobutada (1565-1614). The inscription reads ''The blue-eyed [barbarian] cast off relativity; Like a soaring golden bird he abandoned the world, Entering the holy path''. The ''Blue-eyed barbarian'' is Bodhidharma. The ''holy path'' refers to the Eightfold Path of orthodox Buddhism. The term ''abandon the world'' literally means ''leave home,'' to become a mendicant monk. Nobutada was one who ''stayed home,'' that is a layman. Nobutada, who suffered through many intrigues at the court, admired Bodhidharma’s abandoning of the world. And indeed, at the end of his career, Nobutada resigned his office at the court and went into retirement. Nobutada was a disciple of Zen Master Takuan, and brushed many Zenga, mostly of Tenjin and Daruma. Nobutada used rough paper, and brushed his paintings and inscriptions in the spare Zen style. Painted with ink on paper the work is in very good condition. The mounting has some insect damage, the painting some creasing. A remounting utilizing the existing brocade is a good option but certainly not essential. The image measures 30'' by 12.5'' (76 by 31.5 cm). The scroll measures 59'' by 13'' (150 by 33 cm).


19th c. - Shunga scroll

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1221528

19th c. - Shunga scroll
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Very rare and beautiful female to female erotica (shunga). Two courtesans tightly embraced whilst reading an erotic hand scroll. Hand painted with ink, color and gofun on silk. Stylistically it is based closely on the beauties of the Utagawa school, Kunisada (1786-1865) in particular. The painting is dated upon the Chinese Zodiac with the characters reading the Spring of the Fire Ox. This is a 60 year cyclical calendar so either 1817 or 1877 would be possible, the latter date certainly being more likely. The work is in good condition and presents beautifully. The image measures 34'' by 12'' (88 by 32 cm). The scroll measures 64'' by 16'' (164 by 41 cm). The artist remains anonymous, as was most likely his or her wish. Not actually of the Utagawa school though obviously a highly trained and capable artist. The signature reads Gyokuto. The top seal Gyoku, the lower To. A highly unusual and mischievous sobriquet for an artist. The characters literally read 'Tama usagi', which refers to the rabbit seen in the moon pounding mochi. More specifically it is the title of a Kabuki act. It would appear that it is a successful attempt to cloak the identity of the artist given the sensitive nature of the subject matter.


19th c. - Ducks and reeds

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1220639

19th c. - Ducks and reeds
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A set of four 19th century sliding doors or 'fusuma' dating to the first half of the 19th century. Ducks and reeds, seasonally themed with fall giving way to winter and finally a hint of early spring with the blooming plum tree on the far left. As is often the case the doors are unsigned although they are very much in the style of Kano Eigaku (1790-1867), the ninth head of the Kyo Kano school. Eigaku greatly admired the painting styles of Sanraku and Sansetsu (both earlier heads of the Kyo Kano school) and their influence can be keenly felt in this set of doors. Eigaku's ability and influence was such that he succeeded in temporarily reviving the fortunes of the Kyo Kano school, his works becoming popular amongst all classes. The doors are in good general condition. They are in need of re-mounting and standard touch-ups. Please contact me in regards to this. The set measures 115'' across and 68'' high (293 by 174 cm).


Ito Jakuchu (1716-1800) - Turtles & pine

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1800   item# 1220227

Ito Jakuchu (1716-1800) - Turtles & pine
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Turtles under a pine tree by Ito Jakuchu (1716-1800). Inscription by the unknown artist Beito (signed 73 year old Beito, the seal reads Gyusuien). The inscription reads, 'Tsuru ha sennen, Kame ha mannen, Medetai'. The crane lives a thousand years, the turtle ten thousand. An auspicious life. Painted with ink on paper the work is in quite good condition. It has just been restored and remounted. Some old surface insect damage has been taken care of. The image measures 42.5'' by 12'' (108 by 30 cm). The scroll measures 73'' by 13'' (186 by 32 cm).

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