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Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings (101)

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Shiokawa Bunrin (1808-1877) - Fireflies

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1238314

Shiokawa Bunrin (1808-1877) - Fireflies
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Fireflies gently illuminating the surrounding reeds and stream by Shiokawa Bunrin (1808-1877). 19th century Shijo school painters made the depiction of fireflies their own though none more so than Bunrin. Works by the artist of fireflies illuminating riverscapes at dusk are held in numerous international museums. This work is an interesting departure from these forms, capturing the subtle atmospheric glow just as dusk is beginning to descend. The fireflies are active yet their radiance is muted by the remaining light. Painted with ink and color on silk the work is in good, original condition. One spot is present in the lower-middle field. The lovely brocade is original to the work. The image measures 49'' by 20'' (124 by 50 cm). The scroll measures 76'' by 25'' (194 by 63 cm). Shiokawa Bunrin (1801-1877) was a key figure in the mid 19th century Shijo tradition. Bunrin studied under Okamoto Toyohiko (1773-1845). His influence reached strongly into the 20th century through his student Kono Bairei and further into his students, principal amongst them Tsuji Kako and Takeuchi Seiho.


Yamaguchi Soken (1759-1818) - Bats & crescent moon

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1837 VR   item# 1238313

Yamaguchi Soken (1759-1818) - Bats & crescent moon
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The Maruyama-Shijo painter Yamaguchi Soken has brushed a pair of bats in front of a crescent moon. The bat is a sign of good luck as its name in Chinese is homophonous with fortune. Bats are commonly paired with images of the moon, the essence of the female yin. For examples of the subject brushed in ink by other artists of the Maruyama-Shijo school see A Brush with Animals - Japanese Paintings 1700-1950, published in 2008. Painted with ink on paper the work is in good condition. There are a couple of re-backed insect holes. The work displays well, it was re-mounted perhaps mid 20th century. Light creasing is present in the painting. The image measures 11'' by 18.5'' (28 by 47 cm). The scroll measures 46'' by 23'' (116 by 59 cm). Yamaguchi Soken (1759-1818) is regarded as one of Maruyama Okyo's ten best pupils. A member of the Maruyama-Shijo school in Kyoto he first studied with his father Yamaguchi Sogaku. He is particularly well known for his ukiyo-e paintings and illustrated printed books. Bird and flower paintings and landscapes were also prominent within his oeuvre.


Silver lotus screen pair

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1920   item# 1238090

Silver lotus screen pair
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A pair of two-fold screens depicting white and pink lotus in bloom dating to the early 20th century. One of buddhism's most powerful symbols, this pair of screens would have originally been made for and resided in a Japanese temple. The roots of a lotus are in the mud, the stem grows up through water and the flower lies pristinely above the water, basking in the sunlight. This pattern of growth signifies the progress of the soul from the primeval mud of materialism, through the waters of experience, and into the bright sunshine of enlightenment. The color of the lotus flowers also bears importance in Buddhism. A white lotus flower refers to purity of the mind and the spirit. The pink lotus flower represents the history of Buddha and the historical legends of the Buddha. Painted with color and gofun on a paper ground covered with hand beaten silver leaf, the screens are in very good condition. Each screen measures 68'' by 73'' (173 by 186 cm).


Hawk screen pair

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1837 VR   item# 1238088

Hawk screen pair
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A fine and rare pair of two-fold hawk screens dating to the later 18th or early 19th centuries. A favorite theme of higher ranking samurai; these men saw themselves in the hawk's ruthlessness and strength. Painted on paper with ink, color and gofun the screen are in reasonable condition. Some light surface insect damage is present. The screens are bordered with Edo period Buddhist brocade. They will require new frames and backing paper. Please contact me in regards to this. Each screen measures 68.5'' by 69'' (173 by 174 cm). The signature reads Tanboku Morinao. The lower seal reads Fujiwara Morinao. We haven't uncovered his specific details although it appears highly likely that he was a member of the Kajibashi branch of the Kano school. The Kajibashi branch was headed by the direct descendants of Kano Tanyu. All successive heads of the school shared the same Chinese characters for 'Tan' and 'Mori'; Tanyu Morimichi, Tanshin Morimasa, Tanjo Moritomi, Tanrin Moriyoshi and Tanboku Morikuni (1759-1832).


Kano Sanenobu (fl.1854-1860) - Ink landscape

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1237278

Kano Sanenobu (fl.1854-1860) - Ink landscape
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A mid 19th century Kano school summer landscape depicting a fishing village in rain. Painted with ink on silk, highlighted with washes of gold. The painting has just been remounted and is in very good condition. The image measures 22'' by 33'' (56 by 85 cm). The scroll measures 58'' by 38'' (149 by 98 cm). The signature reads Kano Kyusei Fujiwara Sanenobu. The top seal reads Sanenobu, the lower seal Kyusei. He is the son of Kano Tomonobu. His exact dates are unknown although he is known to have been most active during the Ansei era, 1854-1860. A pair of six-fold ink plum screens were presented to the Netherlands (presumably around their time of painting in 1854) and are currently held in the National Museum of Ethnology, Leiden. They were exhibited in Japan in 2007 in an exhibition titled Biombo. The British museum also holds a pair of scrolls by the artist.


17c. - Tale of Genji screen

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1700   item# 1232243

17c. - Tale of Genji screen
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This 17th century screen displays a selection of scenes from the 11th century novel 'The tale of Genji' by Murasaki Shikibu. Outstanding features of this particular screen include the unusually large figures, the brilliant coloring of their kimono and the surrounding sliding doors and also the remarkable depth and resonance of the gold leaf. The sweeping, graceful composition takes us from the top right scene to Genji observing the game of Go, down along the raised walkway and finally along to the musical scene in the lower center. It has been painted with ink, color and gofun on gold leaf. The screen is in good condition for its age. It has undergone past restorations, though they have always been handled appropriately. Presently the screen is ready for display although the hinges have become a little weak. The screen stands 67'' high and measures 148'' across (170 by 377 cm).


Igarashi Katei (1780-1850) - Pair of dragon screens

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1900   item# 1231020

Igarashi Katei (1780-1850) - Pair of dragon screens
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A set of twelve dragon paintings by Igarashi Katei mounted on a pair of six-fold screens. They were painted in the year of the golden rat which is the 11th year of the Tenpo era, 1840. In Japan the dragon is closely associated with water, and as is the case here, is often shown emerging from vapor and clouds to produce rain. Dragons are generally considered to be aquatic, living in lakes, rivers and the sea. Dragons were also incorporated in Buddhist thought and iconography as a protector of Buddhist law. It is quite unusual to find such a grouping of dragon paintings. Perhaps they were commissioned by a temple as protective images. Rythmical and entrancing when viewed as a whole, skillful and intimate when viewed individually. The images are painted with ink on paper with gold fleck highlights. The paintings are in good overall condition. Some discoloration around the edges is present. The images are mounted on period screens of fair quality, hand-beaten gold leaf surrounded by silk brocade. Each screen measures 69'' by 141'' (175 cm by 358 cm). Each image measures 53'' by 21'' (136 cm by 54 cm). Igarashi Katei (1780-1850), originally from Niigata, was the son of the head priest of Yahata shrine. Katei's birth name is Igarashi Sagami. When Kano Baisho (who attained the rank of Hokyo) moved to Niigata Katei became his student. Katei later moved to Kyoto and studied under Kishi Ganku. At the age of 33 Katei followed his father and became a priest at a shrine. He became particularly popular as an artist from the age of 35, and in a list of Japanese artists published in 1836 Katei held the highest ranking of the Niigata area.


c.1700 - Waterfowl screen pair

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1800   item# 1230193

c.1700 - Waterfowl screen pair
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This unique pair of screens are closely connected to falcon screens and horses in their stable screens, both of which have special significance for the major Shogunal/samurai pastime of falconry. This present pair would have been understood in its time as an image representing the bountiful waterfowl available in the prime hunting grounds. Numerous species of ducks, mallards, teals and even a solitary gull have been described with minute and wondrous detail. Even if the artist did not actually observe every species in the screens, he would have consulted sketches from life or manuals based on sketches of the various birds to satisfy his predilection for realism. The screens date to the late 17th or early 18th centuries, circa 1700. The scenes have been painted with ink, color and gofun on paper. The clouds have been formed with sprinkled flecks of cut gold leaf. The sand bar on the left screen utilizes the moriage technique of raised gofun. The screens have very recently undergone a high level remounting and restoration and display beautifully. Each screen stands 67 inches high and measures 148 inches across (170 by 376 cm). The left screen bears a seal reading either Dotoku or Dosen. We haven't been able to uncover any further information.


c.1700 - Waterfowl screen pair

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1800   item# 1230192

c.1700 - Waterfowl screen pair
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This unique pair of screens are closely connected to falcon screens and horses in their stable screens, both of which have special significance for the major Shogunal/samurai pastime of falconry. This present pair would have been understood in its time as an image representing the bountiful waterfowl available in the prime hunting grounds. Numerous species of ducks, mallards, teals and even a solitary gull have been described with minute and wondrous detail. Even if the artist did not actually observe every species in the screens, he would have consulted sketches from life or manuals based on sketches of the various birds to satisfy his predilection for realism. The screens date to the late 17th or early 18th centuries, circa 1700. The scenes have been painted with ink, color and gofun on paper. The clouds have been formed with sprinkled flecks of cut gold leaf. The sand bar on the left screen utilizes the moriage technique of raised gofun. The screens have very recently undergone a high level remounting and restoration and display beautifully. Each screen stands 67 inches high and measures 148 inches across. The left screen bears a seal reading either Dotoku or Dosen. We haven't been able to uncover any further information.


Kano Ujinobu (1616-1669) - Chinese scholars

Catalogue: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Japanese: Paintings: Pre 1700   item# 1225455

Kano Ujinobu (1616-1669) - Chinese scholars
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A mid 17th century screen depicting a pair of Chinese scholars riding donkeys; perhaps Lin Bu (Lin Hejing) the reclusive Chinese poet of the Song Dynasty and the calligrapher Zhang Zhi. The pair are known to have been depicted riding donkeys along the West Lake causeway in Japanese art of the 17th century. Painted with ink and pigment on gold leaf the screen is in good condition and presents very well. The screen stands 64.5'' high and measures 144'' across (164 by 366 cm). Kano Ujinobu, Daigaku (1616-1669). Son of Kano Soshin (1568-1620) who studied under his father Kano Shoei (1519-1592). Ujinobu was the third-generation head of the Tsukiji Odawaracho branch of the Kano school. Served the Shogunate as Omote Eshi. Omote Eshi were the branch families and disciples of the higher-ranking Oku Eshi. There were four main Oku Eshi branches and fifteen Omote Eshi branches including the Tsukiji Odawaracho.

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