Antique Asian Works of Art from Ancient East
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1920 item #1355831 (stock #TX61)
Ancient East
Sold, Thank You
DESCRIPTION: A Meji Period cotton futonji, flamboyantly decorated with a mythical hoo bird flying with wings and feet outstretched into a paulownia tree to perch, a popular wedding motif. Of four panel construction, this futonji is decorated in the freehand paste resist technique, tsutsugaki, having an indigo base and vibrant, multicolored dyes of red, orange, gray, brown, light blue and black...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1910 item #1300615 (stock #TX42)
Ancient East
SOLD
DESCRIPTION: A beautiful silk brocade obi with a repeating pattern of bamboo, pine and fans in green, gold and yellow tones, woven to give a luxurious sheen to the overall design. This obi is a maru style, the oldest, longest and most sumptuous made. Because the design is woven throughout on both sides, it was very costly even as new, and much heavier than later one-sided designs...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1920 item #1221458 (stock #TX45)
Ancient East
$485
DESCRIPTION: A Japanese fukusa of brocade silk in a supplementary weft weave with both silk and gold metallic threads forming the design of a large crane with wings encircling various sea treasures. Used a gift cover and traditionally draped over a gift given for birthdays or New Years, the choice of an appropriate fukusa suited to the occasion was an important part of the gift-giving ritual. This one has been matted and set in a handsome burl frame. C.1920; wear to threads in a few areas...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1837 VR item #1081815 (stock #TX44)
Ancient East
$5,295
DESCRIPTION: Three rare Edo Period (c. 1790 – 1810), festival banners, hand woven of hemp and decorated with colored zodiac animals dyed in the freehand paste resist technique, tsutsugaki. To remain straight and highly visible in parade processions, these tall banners would have been mounted on poles from the top and along one side using a series of fabric tabs attached to the banner...