ANCIENT- EYES
Ancient -Eyes
$695.00

This 18th-19th century Tibetan or Nepalese bronze oil lamp measures approximately 6 inches tall by 6 inches wide (pan tip to dragon tail).

It was designed to be used as a lamp using either Yak butter or oil.

It has a standing dragon for a handle and a pan with Ganesha on a shield. It is a classic design which incorporates motif from the two cultures (India and China) which are major influences on Tibet (situated between the two of them).

It dates from the late 18th through the middle of the 19th century.

It is in excellent condition with a small amount of verdigris in the recessed areas. It does appear to have been cleaned at some time in it's history and appears to be toning down nicely. It also has some wax residue remaining in a few crevices.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1492 item #1084482
Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

Nepalese Bronze Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani

11th to 14th century: circa 1000-1300 AD.

This outstanding bronze statue of the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani stands 13.5 inches tall not including the two rectangular mounts that extend into it's bronze base.

It stands 15 inches tall including it's bronze lotus base.

It is in excellent condition with much of it's original gilt remaining on the raised areas and his face. The remainder of the original gilt has been lost over the last thousand years or so, exposing a deep copper colored bronze surface.

Among the many forms of Avalokiteshvara, Padmapani is probably the oldest.

Avalokiteshvara is the embodiment of all of the Buddha's infinite compassion.

Padmapani means "lotus in hand". His left hand holds the lotus stalk, while his right hand is lowered in the gesture of granting favors.

This is an early example the use of semi precious stone inlays, a distinctive feature of Tibetan and Nepali sculpture.

His smooth torso and broad shoulders reflect the impact of the Gupta style, which existed in Northern India from the fourth to sixth century. The armlets and crown are traditionally found on 10th to 12th century sculpture.

Additional Nepalese or Nepali scuptural traditions can be seen in the shape of the broad face and full cheekbones which differ from the smaller and fuller facial features found in Indian art. The curves of the eyebrows and eyes and the long line of the nose are also typically Nepalese in style. In addition, the delicately engraved or incised floral pattern of the sarong around his waist is also typically found on early Nepali sculptures .

A larger, but stylistically similar example of an 11th century bronze Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani is held in the Cleveland Museum of Art:

On September 21, 2007 Christies NY sold a 14 inch gilt bronze Avalokitesvara Padmapani for $577,000.00 .

Recently - On March 20, 2012, a 17 7/8 inch tall bronze Padmapani was sold for $2.8 million dollars by Christies Auction House in New York.

THIS IS A MUSEUM QUALITY BRONZE AND IT IS GUARANTEED TO BE AS DESCRIBED, WITH NO EXCEPTIONS.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1800 item #334387
Ancient -Eyes
$4,800.00

This rather substantial jade carving of a frog is in a style which originated in the late Neolithic to Shang Period, but we estimate it to actually date from the middle to late Ming Period (15th -17th Century).

It measures 2 1/2 by 4 1/2 by 1 inch in depth.

It is a gray-green celadon color with dark brown suffusions on it's back.

It is covered with symmetrical designs and shows evidence of much handling. It also has fully articulated toes on the bottom of it's feet. Location-GH-BX6

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1920 item #1082261
Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

This small jade or hard stone carving of a stylized face measures 2.25 inches x 2.75 inches x 1.5 inches in depth.

It's colors range from a medium to dark green to a pale green with areas of translucence. It also has natural inclusions in the stone with areas of dark brown or off white oxidation.

It is carved in the style of old Olmec carvings, but it may be early 20th century. It may also be Chinese, rather than Latin American in origin, but neither origin has been documented yet.

It is unusual in that it has a mounting bracket extending from the reverse side. Similar brackets have been seen on occasion to allow for mounting as architectural components or as decorations in religious settings.

If this stylized carving actually is older than our estimate, it would be worth a great deal more than our asking price.

The mounting bracket would allow for this piece to be worn as a belt slide or buckle, or as a large pendant.

All Items : Antiques : Decorative Art : Ceramics : French : Pottery : Pre 1837 VR item #590481
Ancient -Eyes
$6,500.00

This antique majolica bowl on an ornately detailed bronze stand measures 17 inches wide by 15 inches tall by 7 1/2 inches in depth.

It dates circa 1760-1840. It is European, and most likely French in origin.

It is in outstanding condition, period. The majolica bowl is in excellent condition with no chips or losses, although there is a lovely crackle to the glaze on the interior of the bowl. The bronze mounts retain much of their original gilding, with no apparent repairs to their delicate, almost spiderweb designs.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1220077
Ancient -Eyes
$295.00

This Japanese bronze handled mirror measures about 8 inches in diameter (21cm) with an extended handle which increases the full height to about 12 inches or 30 centimeters(cm).

It dates to the late Edo Period or Early Meiji period ( about the middle of the 19th century (1840-1860).

It is signed in the left portion of the front. It also has birds flying over churning waves in the ocean.

It still has most of it's silver ovrlay on the two large Kanji marks on the front. It also has remnants of it's silver on the reverse or "Face" of the mirror.

Bronze mirrors were introduced into Japan from China and Korea about 300 BC - AD 300.

At first they had a religious function and were regarded as symbols of authority.

The Japanese soon learned to make their own mirrors using lost-wax casting and decorated them with Japanese or Chinese designs.

By the Nara period (AD 710-794) mirrors were made for everyday use and used designs such as plants and animals to symbolize good fortune.

From the Kamakura period (1185-1333) a design showing Hôraizan (the Chinese 'Island of Immortality') became popular.. More new designs and the first handled mirrors appeared in the Muromachi period (1333-1568).

During the Edo period (1600-1868), mirrors decorated with lucky symbols or Chinese characters were given at weddings. Mirrors became larger as hairstyles became more ornate; some mirrors in Kabuki theatre dressing-rooms were up to fifty centimetres across and were placed on stands. The faces of mirrors were highly polished or burnished, with itinerant tinners and polishers specializing in this work. Since the mirror, together with the sword and the jewel, were symbols of Imperial power, mirror-makers were deeply revered and often given honorary titles such as Tenka-Ichi ('First under Heaven'). However, this title was often misused and was officially prohibited in 1682. Bronze mirrors were replaced by glass mirrors after the Meiji Restoration (1868).

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre 1900 item #587249
Ancient -Eyes
$1,495.00

This unusual painted lacquer and carved Shibiyama panel measures about 15 1/4 inches by 12 inches by 1/2 inch thick. It has an outstanding pattern of carved and inlaid pieces creating a finely detailed picture of birds and flowers on a deep sky blue oval background. It is surrounded by raised gilt and vermillion lacquer paintings of fruit and plants.

It dates to the late 19th century or Meiji Period in Japan.

It has an inset, carved rectangle with the artist's signature in the lower left corner of the blue lacquer oval.

It may have originally been the cover to a book or woodblock print album.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1800 item #1057191
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Inquire for Price

This antique bronze figure of Mahakala measures 10 inches wide by 12 inches tall by 3 inches in depth (at it's widest points)

It dates from 17th to 18th century Nepal or Tibet (circa 1600's-1700's)

It is in very good condition with remnants of gilt along with green verdigris (oxidation). Note: the bronze is slightly loose on its base. This does not affect it when placed against a wall.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Ivory : Pre 1900 item #879067
Ancient -Eyes
$4,800.00

This 19th century Japanese carved ivory okimono measures approximately 9 inches tall by 2 1/2 inches in diameter at it's widest point.

It is intricately carved with fully delineated scales and teeth on the fish. The figure riding a fish is carved from one solid walrus tusk and it sits on a separate oval section as a base. The crystalline pattern that is so indicative of walrus ivory can be seen in many places on the carving, including Kinko's robe (interior front left) and the belly of the carp or koi.

It dates from the Meiji Period in Japan (circa 1870-1900).

It is in very good condition with some stabilized antique ivory fractures as are seen on many of these okimonos that are well over 100 years old.

Japan originally imported and adapted many Taoist and Buddhist teachings from China, which were then combined with native Shinto beliefs.

One Taoist figure incorporated into Japanese artwork was Kinko, a holy hermit. He is often depicted mounted on the enormous carp that carried him to the Undersea Kingdom. There, sea creatures taught him that all life is sacred.

In Japan the carp (koi) is also a symbol of persistence, longevity, and fertility. Land-locked farmers have kept carp in their ponds to provide food for centuries and also bred them for their beautiful colors.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #656890
Ancient -Eyes
$2,695.00

This standing nephrite jade carving of a bearded and robed figure with long horns or a headdress of some sort measures about 10 1/2 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth.

It is carved from a large piece of nephrite ranging from pale to deep green with a strip of oxidized white to yellow jade down the middle. In addition, there is a crackled stripe of oxidation running down through the center of the face through the figure to the bottom of the robe.

There are also engraved rectangular patterns and additional patterns on the robe.

Although the serious possibility exists that this is an old nephrite carving dating to the Shang period, we are dating this one very conservatively to about circa 1900-1920. If it turns out to be much older, we are certain the buyer will not be too upset.

It is interesting to note, however, that the oxidation and subsequent crackling of the stone that runs right down through the face probably occurred after the jade was carved. The question arises: if this is a copy made in the last 100 years or so, why didn't they turn it around before they carved the face, as the center of the back side is pristine where the face could have been positioned, no crackling or deterioration? It would have been the better choice to use as the front and would have made a more attractive and potentially more saleable copy. If however, the deterioration of the stone actually happened over an extended period of time after it was carved, that would make more sense as an explanation as to why the current positioning of the stone in relation to it's natural flaws or irregularities.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #95868 (stock #TR0156)
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Inquire for Price

This original Ming Dynasty ceramic or stoneware tile with a figure of a seated Buddha measures about 6 3/4 x 9 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches.

It is in very good condition with minor losses to the glaze in a few areas along with a few small rim chips.

Stylistically, it has more in common with Song Dynasty ceramics, but most likely it dates to the Ming Dynasty.

This architectural tile appears to have been designed to be mounted in the wall of a shrine or temple and has a pattern of large shaped dovetails on the reverse for that purpose (see enlargement photo).

This museum quality piece consists of very dense stoneware covered with colored glazes in turquoise, aubergine and yellow.

This Buddha tile dates from the Ming Dynasty or earlier.

A Few Facts:

The Shanyin Hall at the White Dagoba Temple was built or restored by the Qianlong emperor in 1751, 30 years after a large earthquake damaged the same area in Beijing.

Shanyin Hall currently has 445 Buddha tiles of similar style, but of later manufacture (probably circa 1976 -when it was last restored after the Tangshan earthquake.) (See the last photograph).

It may have have had tiles similar to the one we are offering prior to it's previous restorations in 1751 or 1976.

It is quite possible that this turquoise Buddha tile may be a remnant of one of those earlier changes or restorations.

We currently have in our collection a tile similar to the current tiles that are currently mounted in Shanyin Hall in Beijing. Our tile is marked with Wanli reign Marks (1573- 1619). This is not the tile we are offering with this lot. The one we are offering actually appears to be earlier than this Wanli tile, but it is unmarked.

We can't document it yet, but it is a serious possibility that this old Buddha tile dates to before 1619.

Our research shows that the original tiles were probably held in place with lime mortar-not the best thing to use in an earthquake zone.

This tile we offer here may have been salvaged from an old temple restoration or from a temple no longer in existence. This same area has seen earthquakes in 1679, again in 1730 and again in 1976-to name a few.

All of this is a combination of verifiable facts and speculation, but speculation based on observable and documented facts.

_____________________________________________________________________

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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #893016
Ancient -Eyes
$8,000.00

This Japanese painted bronze figure of Daikoku measures approximately 13.5 inches tall by 6 inches wide by 5 inches in depth.

It is a substantial bronze figure, weighing around 13+ pounds or about 6 kilos.

It is signed or marked on both the figure and the separate base of rice bales (see two of the enlargement pictures).

It dates from the late Meiji to Taisho Period (circa 1890-1912).

It is in excellent condition with most of it's original colored and patinated surfaces intact. An exception to this is the loss of a small triangular shaped piece which was apparently once attached at the figure's midsection (see photo enlargement of loss). This most likely was originally a separate attachment (see the drill hole?) in the shape of a small pouch (or treasure sack) which Daikoku traditionally carried.

Since the 17th century, Daikoku has been known as the Japanese god of wealth, the household and of farmers, although in earlier centuries he was considered a fierce protector deity (Mahakala).

In Japan, artwork of this deity usually shows him wearing a hood and standing on two bales of rice, carrying a sack of treasure and holding a magic mallet. Daikoku is often clad in robes, with a smile on his face.

In some traditions, Daikoku is also considered to be a provider of food, and images of him can still be found in monastery kitchens and in the kitchens of private homes. He is recognized by his wide face, smile, and a flat black hat.

He is often portrayed holding a golden mallet (called a Uchide Nokozuchi), also known as a magic money mallet, and is seen positioned on bales of rice, occasionally with mice nearby (mice signifying plentiful food).

Originally a Hindu deity called Mahakala, he was introduced to Japan in the ninth century, and merged with the Shinto deity of good harvests, Oo-kuninushi-no-Mikoto (or Okuninushi-no-Kami, translated as "Prince Plenty"). The lucky mallet in his right hand is called the uchide nokozuchi. This mallet is said to have magical properties that can produce anything desired when struck. Some stories say that coins fall out when he shakes his mallet. Others say that believers are granted their heart's desire by tapping a symbolic mallet on the ground three times and making a wish.

The symbol of the precious Buddhist Jewel, sometimes found on Daikoku's mallet or belt, represents the themes of wealth and unfolding possibility. It is said to give its holder the ability to see all things (like a crystal ball).

The precious jewel is one of the seven symbols of royal power in Buddhism. Daikokyu, himself is considered to be one of the seven household gods of Japan.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre 1920 item #685537
Ancient -Eyes
$795.00
This antique copper and silver lidded jar or box measures 6 3/4 inches tall by 6 inches in diameter.

The copper and silver lid is covered with repeating patterns, auspicious symbols and tiny cabachons in turquoise and coral.

The lid is topped by a large (24mm) turquoise bead giving the appearance of a small globe of the earth. In addition, it has four silver shield shapes with large inset carved jades that may represent the four directions (North, South, East, West).

It dates from the late 19th to early 20th century in Tibet or Nepal.

It is in excellent condition with a nice even patinas on the both the copper and silver areas.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre 1900 item #1188953
Ancient -Eyes
$750.00

This antique silver cup was probably made from melted Spanish silver coins that came from silver produced in the mines of Mexico or South America, c. 1800-1860.

It has engraved and chiseled decorative borders and an applied handle in the shape if a two headed dragon.

It stands 3 1/2" in height, 4 1/4" across the handle and weighs 108 grams or 3.72 Troy ounces.

It is in excellent condition with no dents, losses or repairs.

It also has no marks or monograms and is guaranteed to be at least .900 pure (coin silver).

Ancient -Eyes
$2,400.00

This antique Persian Silver vase measures 7 inches tall (17 cm) by 5 1/2 inches in diameter (14.5 cm).

It dates circa 1700-1850 or earlier.

It is finely engraved with alternating medallions of bird in an ornate floral landscape and medallions of symmetrical calligraphy. Between the medallions are additional engraved floral wreaths

There are three silver hallmarks on the base. The usual standard of Persian silver is .84 or 84/100 pure silver.

Condition is excellent except for a small bung (see enlargement). Overall, this is an outstanding work of art and much nicer than my poor photos would indicate. Any color changes in the photos are from the flash and not on the vase itself.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1900 item #82710 (stock #TR0113)
Ancient -Eyes
$695.00

This antique wooden mask is a representation of Mahakala.

It dates from the late 19th or earlier.

It is similar in style and iconography to masks from Nepal, Tibet or Sikkim.

It measures about 13 inches high by 9 inches wide.

It is in very good condition except for a few small cracks and losses to the wood. It has remnants of remaining overpaint in the crevices and recessed areas.

Comparables Note: a slightly larger mask with the original paint remaining is listed in Miller's Price Guide(2003) at $7,800-$9,400 (Sotheby's - NY)(see photo enlargement #4).

All Items : Antiques : Decorative Art : Ceramics : Pre 1910 item #1185861
Ancient -Eyes
$240.00

This triple ceramic dish with handle dates to the 19th through early part of the 20th century.

It is designed with a shape similar to a shamrock or three leaf clover.

It measures about 11 inches by 11 inches by about 4 inches tall.

It is hand painted with numerous designs of yellow daisies.

It is in excellent condition with losses to the gilding--primarily on the handle.

It appears to be European or Baltic in origin.

This may have originally been used as a relish or condiment dish.

There are no marks, makers names or country of origin. That in itself helps to date it to about circa 1900 or earlier.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1800 item #85306 (stock #TR0131)
Ancient -Eyes
$3,600.00

These two bronze figures date from the 17-18th century or earlier.

Each one represents either Mahakala or Samantabhadra standing on a prostrate human figure surrounded by a ring of fire and wearing a garland of severed human heads.

Each measures about 8 inches tall by 5 inches wide.

Both are in excellent condition except for a small square opening on the back of one.