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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1700 item #173287 (stock #TR0251)
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$2,400.00

This outstanding quality Ding Yao covered ceramic box, although Song Dynasty in appearance, may actually date from the Ming or Ching Dynasty.

It measures 8 inches in diameter by about 3 inches in height.

The domed cover is incised with repeating leaf patterns around a central leaf set within a circle.

It is in excellent condition with a circular kiln fracture around the outside of the bottom rim (see enlargement photo). This is original to the piece and is not considered damage.

All Items : Antiques : Decorative Art : Folk Art : Pre 1837 VR item #877013
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$595.00

This Chinese Export or English Chinoiserie lacquered box measures about 7 inches by 5 3/4 inches by 1 3/4 inches.

It dates from the late 18th-middle 19th century.

It is hand painted with a scene of eight figures in a pagoda and garden landscape. The figures are painted in gold over a black lacquer and wood base.

It is in very good condition except for a few very minor cracks and small losses to the lacquer.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #1099141
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$32,000.00

This large jadeite carving of Guanyin (Kwan Yin) measures 4.5 inches wide by 3.5 inches in depth by 12.5 inches tall (including the period carved wooden base it sits on).

We estimate the jade itself to be about 11.5 inches tall without the stand. It sits about a half inch down in the stand and is bolted down (actually bolted down to the stand) (Someone was VERY careful with this old jade).

It is carved fom one piece of multicolored apple green jade with various shades of green flowing through it and a wonderfully rich color on it's face. It also has a few small inclusions of very dark green jade near it's base. These are all natural colors. This is NOT a color enhanced jade, guaranteed.

It dates from the late 18th century through the latter part of the 19th century.

It is in excellent condtion with no losses or repairs. It does have some natural inclusions on it's reverse that could be mistaken for damage. Be assured, they are natural fissures in the stone that have oxidized over the last century or so.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Earthenware : Pre 1900 item #261238 (stock #TR0306)
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$1,200.00

This hand painted ceramic vase measures about 10 inches (24.5 cm)tall by 5 inches (13 cm) in diameter at it's widest point.

It dates circa 1870-1900 (during the late Meiji Period) in Japan.

It is in excellent condition with virtually all of the high relief gilding intact.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #893016
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$8,000.00

This Japanese painted bronze figure of Daikoku measures approximately 13.5 inches tall by 6 inches wide by 5 inches in depth.

It is a substantial bronze figure, weighing around 13+ pounds or about 6 kilos.

It is signed or marked on both the figure and the separate base of rice bales (see two of the enlargement pictures).

It dates from the late Meiji to Taisho Period (circa 1890-1912).

It is in excellent condition with most of it's original colored and patinated surfaces intact. An exception to this is the loss of a small triangular shaped piece which was apparently once attached at the figure's midsection (see photo enlargement of loss). This most likely was originally a separate attachment (see the drill hole?) in the shape of a small pouch (or treasure sack) which Daikoku traditionally carried.

Since the 17th century, Daikoku has been known as the Japanese god of wealth, the household and of farmers, although in earlier centuries he was considered a fierce protector deity (Mahakala).

In Japan, artwork of this deity usually shows him wearing a hood and standing on two bales of rice, carrying a sack of treasure and holding a magic mallet. Daikoku is often clad in robes, with a smile on his face.

In some traditions, Daikoku is also considered to be a provider of food, and images of him can still be found in monastery kitchens and in the kitchens of private homes. He is recognized by his wide face, smile, and a flat black hat.

He is often portrayed holding a golden mallet (called a Uchide Nokozuchi), also known as a magic money mallet, and is seen positioned on bales of rice, occasionally with mice nearby (mice signifying plentiful food).

Originally a Hindu deity called Mahakala, he was introduced to Japan in the ninth century, and merged with the Shinto deity of good harvests, Oo-kuninushi-no-Mikoto (or Okuninushi-no-Kami, translated as "Prince Plenty"). The lucky mallet in his right hand is called the uchide nokozuchi. This mallet is said to have magical properties that can produce anything desired when struck. Some stories say that coins fall out when he shakes his mallet. Others say that believers are granted their heart's desire by tapping a symbolic mallet on the ground three times and making a wish.

The symbol of the precious Buddhist Jewel, sometimes found on Daikoku's mallet or belt, represents the themes of wealth and unfolding possibility. It is said to give its holder the ability to see all things (like a crystal ball).

The precious jewel is one of the seven symbols of royal power in Buddhism. Daikokyu, himself is considered to be one of the seven household gods of Japan.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pre 1900 item #834235
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This item is currently being auctioned

This large Chinese Cloisonne covered box measures 15 inches in diameter. It actually measures 17.5 inches wide, when you include the bronze handles on either side. It also measures 8 inches tall.

It is in excellent condition with the exception of a small circular restored spot on the bottom of the exterior. It appears to have been repaired in the late 19th century, based on the odd shade of green enamel that was used in the repair.

The cloisonne scene on the lid consists of a phoenix (fenghuang) looking down on a mountain range across the waters and under a red sun (a possible reference to Japan).

The chrysanthemums in the foreground may refer to Japanese royalty. This could have been designed as a gift for Japanese royalty.

Ancient -Eyes
$695.00

This 18th-19th century Tibetan or Nepalese bronze oil lamp measures approximately 6 inches tall by 6 inches wide (pan tip to dragon tail).

It was designed to be used as a lamp using either Yak butter or oil.

It has a standing dragon for a handle and a pan with Ganesha on a shield. It is a classic design which incorporates motif from the two cultures (India and China) which are major influences on Tibet (situated between the two of them).

It dates from the late 18th through the middle of the 19th century.

It is in excellent condition with a small amount of verdigris in the recessed areas. It does appear to have been cleaned at some time in it's history and appears to be toning down nicely. It also has some wax residue remaining in a few crevices.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1800 item #1097959
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This item is currently being auctioned

This jade carving of a Chinese lion, Chimera or Fu dog sits at an alert posture on all four paws.

It has a split or bifurcated tail and stylized wings.

It measures 2 1/2 inches by 1 7/8 inches by 1 1/4 inch (57 mm x 49 mm x 31 mm).

It is carved from a piece of off white to celadon colored jade with natural striations running through it. There is a natural brown irregularity which runs from it's foot to it's ear on one side along with a small area of brown suffusion on it's flank.

(This is the fancy way of saying it has few areas of rust. Not a bad thing for a genuine antique jade carving.)

We are dating this one to the Qing Dynasty, but it may actually be much earlier.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1800 item #806896
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This item is currently being auctioned

This pair of Chinese Seated Lions date from the 17th -19th Century or possibly a bit earlier.

These pottery or earthenware lions each measure about 9.5 - 10 inches tall by 6 inches wide by about 4 inches in depth.

They are in very good condition with only a small loss to one of the tails.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #566281
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$2,495.00

This Japanese ceramic figure of Kannon measures 17 inches tall and about 6 inches in diameter at its widest point.

It has four incised marks on it's base, two Kutani marks and two potters mark (see closeup photo).

It dates to the Meiji Period in Japan. Kwannon is also known as Kannon or Kwan Yin and Guanyin in China.

It is in outstanding condition with no flaws, cracks, chips or losses.

All Items : Antiques : Decorative Art : Metals : Silver : Sterling : Pre 1900 item #878595
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$1,200.00

This engraved Sterling Silver tankard dates from the decade following the American Civil War (circa 1870-79 ).

It measures 3.5 inches tall by 2.5 -2.75 inches in diameter (not including the handle). It also measures 4 inches from the handle to the front edge of the cup.

It weighs 189 grams or 6.08 troy ounces.

It is marked on the bottom of the cup: ENG' STERLING 925-100 .

This is an American Silver Tankard Dated 1879 which may have served as a Christening cup.

A somewhat similar mark can be seen at the link below

http://www.smpub.com/ubb/Forum1/HTML/000303.html

It has been suggested that ENG may mean English Silver. This is incorrect because all English silver from this period had to be hallmarked in the English manner. However, before the sterling standard was fully adopted by the American silver manufacturing establishment, manufacturers who WERE making sterling often marked their wares "ENGLISH STERLING", as in this example.

This piece is not English, it just is up to the English sterling standard.

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It also has the number 26 with gothic B's in diamond stamps on either side (B 26 B)

In 1866 William Bogert bought out the business of prominent New york City manufacturer Charles Grosjean, and formed William Bogert & Co. with Bernard Beiderhase. We believe that this silver cup or tankard was manufactured by Bogert and Beiderbase (B and B) under the eventual name of William Bogert and Company.

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This is a solid sterling silver tankard and guaranteed as such.

It is in excellent condition with a nice even finish and a subtle patina.

It has a couple of extremely minor scrapes along the outside bottom edge where it appears to have been tested for silver purity during the last 130 years.

It is also engraved on the front: Tracey Lay Turner --September 1879 (surrounded by a delicate flowing engraving of wheat and or berries.)

Overall, this is a very clean and pristine example of late 19th century American Silver with documentation that leads us all the way back to it's original owner.

Biographical Information:

Tracey lay Turner was a Stock broker and banker (among other things) who lived and worked in 19th century Chicago.

The following information is an excerp from the Book Of Chicagoans (a sort of Who’s Who from the 19th-20th Century):

TURNER, Tracy lay, stock broker: born Chicago, Aug. 26, 1879*

Son of Edward H. and Ida B. (Foster) Turner; educated in private schools; married Chicago, Oct. 3, 1899, Claribel Countiss; 2 sons: Tracy L.,Jr. and Foster.

Began in Marshall Field & Co.'s wholesale house, 1896, and later was with Whiteside & Wentworth, real estate.

In 1897 he entered the employ of Chapln & Gaylord, stock and bond brokers and later became office manager.

In February 1901, he is lsted as a partner in the firm of S. B. Chapln & Co , bankers and brokers.

Republican. Episcopalian. Clubs: Chicago Athletic, Union League, South Shore Country, Glen View, Kenwood Country, Tuscumbia. Recreations: golf, fishing and motoring. Residence: 1120 E. 48th St. Office: The Rookery.

*Note_ Tracey Lay Turner was born on August 26, 1879, so either the Chicagoan or the engraver got it wrong by 4 days. It has been suggested that the difference or error may be related to a Christening date. So the date on the cup may actually be the date of christening rather than the date of birth.

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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Earthenware : Pre 1900 item #92349 (stock #TR0149)
Ancient -Eyes
$895.00

This forest green glazed Kochi ware vase with handles measures 12 cm tall by 12 cm in diameter by 19 cm wide (handle to handle). It most likely dates to the beginning of the 20th century. The glaze pools dark green in the crevices.

There are NO marks or signatures on this vase.

It is in excellent condition. No chips, cracks, hairlines, repairs, etc. It does have a few very light surface scratches to the glaze. There are four round felt pads on the bottom of the vase (see enlargement photos).

The glaze is even and complete. Any white spots or lines are from the flash and are NOT on the vase itself.

Japanese Awaji ware was influenced by or copied after, Chinese Cochin ware: a 16th century pottery originally produced in Southern China or Vietnam. It consisted primarily of green glazed wares with low relief decoration* (*Ceramic Art of Japan, Seattle Art Museum, Page 164)(CAJ).

Another theory about the origin of Cochi or Cochin ware is that it was carried from China to South East Asia (modern Day Vietnam and Thailand) during the Song or Yuan Dynasty . In 1206 the Mongolian tribes met and agreed to unite under Genghis Khan. In 1215 Genghis Khan captured Beijing. In 1279 Kublai Khan, his grandson, completed the Quest of China, ending the Song Dynasty. The Yuan dynasty that they created lasted from 1279 to 1368 (1368- 1644 A.D. Ming dynasty). Faced with Mongol rule artists, potters, merchants and exporters left China and set up their operations in Vietnam and Thailand. The Sung kiln and glaze technologies were transferred to Vietnam. Bat Trang (in Vietnam) prospered and continued to do so as the Ming dynasty maintained a closed-door policy until 1567. It was not until 1684 that the Chinese competed effectively with Vietnamese ceramics exporters. By this time Vietnamese pottery had achieved such popularity in Japan that even the Japanese potters produced ceramics in the Vietnamese style, which they called Cochi or Kochi ware. During the late Edo Period there was a fashion among Kyoto potters (including Eiraku Hozen, Ogata Kenzan, and Aoki Mokubei) to emulate the Chinese wares of the 16th century, especially the export blue and white, gosu-akae, and Kochi ware** (**CAJ-pg 158).

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Stoneware : Pre 1837 VR item #565889
Ancient -Eyes
$6,400.00

This glazed ceramic seated Buddha measures 7 inches tall by 6 1/2 inches wide by about 5 inches in depth.

It consists of a blue glaze over buff ceramic. The glaze is a deep sky blue ranging to shades of turquoise and pooling to black in the crevices. The bottom has a very fine mesh pattern embedded in it that resembles linen. There are no marks of any kind on it.

This seated figure dates to the Kangxi period of the Ching Dynasty (1644-1911) or possibly earlier.

It is in excellent condition, period.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre 1800 item #604185
Ancient -Eyes
$2,400.00

This substantial bronze handled pitcher measures 6 inches tall by 4 inches wide by 7 inches in depth.

We are dating this one to circa 1790-1820, but it may be much, much older. It is either a Neoclassical bronze copy of a Roman bronze or the real thing. We have priced it as a copy, but if real, you can add a couple of "00"s to it's price.

It is in excellent condition, except for a few small bungs and a restoration to the base. The bottom appears to have had three holes filled a long time ago. It may also have been leveled a bit to allow it to sit evenly (this part is speculation).

It has an even greenish black patina overall.

Ancient -Eyes
$2,400.00

This antique Persian Silver vase measures 7 inches tall (17 cm) by 5 1/2 inches in diameter (14.5 cm).

It dates circa 1700-1850 or earlier.

It is finely engraved with alternating medallions of bird in an ornate floral landscape and medallions of symmetrical calligraphy. Between the medallions are additional engraved floral wreaths

There are three silver hallmarks on the base. The usual standard of Persian silver is .84 or 84/100 pure silver.

Condition is excellent except for a small bung (see enlargement). Overall, this is an outstanding work of art and much nicer than my poor photos would indicate. Any color changes in the photos are from the flash and not on the vase itself.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1492 item #665687
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Price on Request

This large bronze figure of Avalokitesvara dates somewhere between the Song Dynasty and the Ming Dynasty in China.

This figure represents one third of a Buddhist Triad, which may have originally been created as an altarpiece in a Buddhist temple.

This bronze figure measures 21 inches tall by 9 inches wide by 8 inches in depth. He/she is depicted wearing a Tang Dynasty upraised hair style and ornate robes and jeweled detailing.

It is in excellent condition with remnants of old gilt and colors remaining in areas. The head is completely covered with a layer of gold and the remainder is covered with a deep brown patina overall.

Traditionally, Avalokitesvara would sit on the left side of Amitabha Buddha in a three figure triad with Mahasthamaprapta sitting on the right side. There are engraved Chinese characterson the reverse side of it's base which translate as left two.

There are additional marks on the Gui held in front of the figure which may represent the date or the original donor of the bronze.

Since the side figures of a triad were smaller than the central figure,the central Buddha must have been fairly large. This fits with the theory of an origin in a temple or possibly a very wealthy home.

In Chinese Buddhism the Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara is also known as Guanyin. Among the Chinese, Avalokitesvara is almost exclusively called Guanshiyin Pusa. Some Daoist scriptures give her the title of Guanyin Dashi, and sometimes informally as Guanyin Fozu.

In Chinese Buddhism, the worship of Guanyin as a goddess by the populace is generally not in conflict with the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara's nature. In fact the widespread worship of Guanyin as a "Goddess of Mercy and Compassion" is seen as the boundless salvific nature of bodhisattva Avalokitesvara at work. The Buddhist canon states that bodhisattvas can assume whatsoever gender and form is needed to liberate beings from ignorance

This museum quality gilt bronze figure was purchased from an old collection of Asian antiques originally formed during the early portion of the 20th century.

The authenticity of this bronze is guaranteed without exception.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1492 item #1084482
Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

Nepalese Bronze Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani

11th to 14th century: circa 1000-1300 AD.

This outstanding bronze statue of the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani stands 13.5 inches tall not including the two rectangular mounts that extend into it's bronze base.

It stands 15 inches tall including it's bronze lotus base.

It is in excellent condition with much of it's original gilt remaining on the raised areas and his face. The remainder of the original gilt has been lost over the last thousand years or so, exposing a deep copper colored bronze surface.

Among the many forms of Avalokiteshvara, Padmapani is probably the oldest.

Avalokiteshvara is the embodiment of all of the Buddha's infinite compassion.

Padmapani means "lotus in hand". His left hand holds the lotus stalk, while his right hand is lowered in the gesture of granting favors.

This is an early example the use of semi precious stone inlays, a distinctive feature of Tibetan and Nepali sculpture.

His smooth torso and broad shoulders reflect the impact of the Gupta style, which existed in Northern India from the fourth to sixth century. The armlets and crown are traditionally found on 10th to 12th century sculpture.

Additional Nepalese or Nepali scuptural traditions can be seen in the shape of the broad face and full cheekbones which differ from the smaller and fuller facial features found in Indian art. The curves of the eyebrows and eyes and the long line of the nose are also typically Nepalese in style. In addition, the delicately engraved or incised floral pattern of the sarong around his waist is also typically found on early Nepali sculptures .

A larger, but stylistically similar example of an 11th century bronze Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani is held in the Cleveland Museum of Art:

On September 21, 2007 Christies NY sold a 14 inch gilt bronze Avalokitesvara Padmapani for $577,000.00 .

Recently - On March 20, 2012, a 17 7/8 inch tall bronze Padmapani was sold for $2.8 million dollars by Christies Auction House in New York.

THIS IS A MUSEUM QUALITY BRONZE AND IT IS GUARANTEED TO BE AS DESCRIBED, WITH NO EXCEPTIONS.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #656890
Ancient -Eyes
$2,695.00

This standing nephrite jade carving of a bearded and robed figure with long horns or a headdress of some sort measures about 10 1/2 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth.

It is carved from a large piece of nephrite ranging from pale to deep green with a strip of oxidized white to yellow jade down the middle. In addition, there is a crackled stripe of oxidation running down through the center of the face through the figure to the bottom of the robe.

There are also engraved rectangular patterns and additional patterns on the robe.

Although the serious possibility exists that this is an old nephrite carving dating to the Shang period, we are dating this one very conservatively to about circa 1900-1920. If it turns out to be much older, we are certain the buyer will not be too upset.

It is interesting to note, however, that the oxidation and subsequent crackling of the stone that runs right down through the face probably occurred after the jade was carved. The question arises: if this is a copy made in the last 100 years or so, why didn't they turn it around before they carved the face, as the center of the back side is pristine where the face could have been positioned, no crackling or deterioration? It would have been the better choice to use as the front and would have made a more attractive and potentially more saleable copy. If however, the deterioration of the stone actually happened over an extended period of time after it was carved, that would make more sense as an explanation as to why the current positioning of the stone in relation to it's natural flaws or irregularities.