ANCIENT- EYES
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #877532
Ancient -Eyes
$395.00

This Japanese Satsuma pitcher or condiment jar measures about 6 inches tall by 4 inches in diameter at it's widest point.

It dates from the late 19th century-early 20th Century( Meiji Period) (circa 1880-1915).

It is in excellent condition with some minor losses to the gilding on the handle.

It is covered overall with a finely detailed series of patterns, which include a bird and dragon motif with fans.

Based on it's rounded and smoothed edges, it appears that this small vessel never originally had a permanent top or stopper.

It is unmarked as to maker or country of origin . This one fact helps to date it pre 1895 when US import export laws were established. After that date it would have had to have been marked as to country of origin.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Earthenware : Pre 1900 item #261238 (stock #TR0306)
Ancient -Eyes
$1,200.00

This hand painted ceramic vase measures about 10 inches (24.5 cm)tall by 5 inches (13 cm) in diameter at it's widest point.

It dates circa 1870-1900 (during the late Meiji Period) in Japan.

It is in excellent condition with virtually all of the high relief gilding intact.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #719023
Ancient -Eyes
$895.00

This Meiji period JAPANESE KUTANI VASE measures 7 inches in diameter and 11 inches tall. We date this one circa 1880-1910.

It is in excellent condition overall with the raised gilding in outstanding condition.

It is unsigned, but there is a hand painted mark on the bottom edge that looks like: I I I O .

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1492 item #600751
Ancient -Eyes
$1,295.00

This white nephrite jade carving of a pig dates from the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD).

It measures 4 inches nose to tail, by about 1 3/8 inches tall by 1 inch in width.

It is an overall white color with traces of brown oxidation in the crevices. It has areas of irregularity on it's flat and rounded surfaces that create an almost spider web like pattern (off white on white colors).

It is in excellent condition except for one drill hole in the tail which does not appear to be contemporary with the piece. It was most likely added so it could be worn as a pendant.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1800 item #806896
Ancient -Eyes
This item is currently being auctioned

This pair of Chinese Seated Lions date from the 17th -19th Century or possibly a bit earlier.

These pottery or earthenware lions each measure about 9.5 - 10 inches tall by 6 inches wide by about 4 inches in depth.

They are in very good condition with only a small loss to one of the tails.

Ancient -Eyes
$4,800.00
This 17th to 18th century bronze figure of the elephant headed god GANESH is from Northern India or Nepal. It measures 11 1/2 inches tall by 6 1/2 inches wide by 4 inches in depth. This bronze figure is in outstanding condition. It pictures a standing Ganesh with four arms holding religious symbols, with a Naga mounting it and a large surround behind it with a Nepalese demon/dragon finial.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #105013 (stock #TR0175)
Ancient -Eyes
$375.00

This blue & white ceramic bottle or jar measures 9 inches tall by 3 1/4 inches in diameter.

It is hand painted with scenes in cobalt blue on a white ground.

It is in excellent condition with a few natural fissures and irregularities to the glaze (see close up photos).

We estimate it to date circa 1700-1900.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1220077
Ancient -Eyes
$295.00

This Japanese bronze handled mirror measures about 8 inches in diameter (21cm) with an extended handle which increases the full height to about 12 inches or 30 centimeters(cm).

It dates to the late Edo Period or Early Meiji period ( about the middle of the 19th century (1840-1860).

It is signed in the left portion of the front. It also has birds flying over churning waves in the ocean.

It still has most of it's silver ovrlay on the two large Kanji marks on the front. It also has remnants of it's silver on the reverse or "Face" of the mirror.

Bronze mirrors were introduced into Japan from China and Korea about 300 BC - AD 300.

At first they had a religious function and were regarded as symbols of authority.

The Japanese soon learned to make their own mirrors using lost-wax casting and decorated them with Japanese or Chinese designs.

By the Nara period (AD 710-794) mirrors were made for everyday use and used designs such as plants and animals to symbolize good fortune.

From the Kamakura period (1185-1333) a design showing Hôraizan (the Chinese 'Island of Immortality') became popular.. More new designs and the first handled mirrors appeared in the Muromachi period (1333-1568).

During the Edo period (1600-1868), mirrors decorated with lucky symbols or Chinese characters were given at weddings. Mirrors became larger as hairstyles became more ornate; some mirrors in Kabuki theatre dressing-rooms were up to fifty centimetres across and were placed on stands. The faces of mirrors were highly polished or burnished, with itinerant tinners and polishers specializing in this work. Since the mirror, together with the sword and the jewel, were symbols of Imperial power, mirror-makers were deeply revered and often given honorary titles such as Tenka-Ichi ('First under Heaven'). However, this title was often misused and was officially prohibited in 1682. Bronze mirrors were replaced by glass mirrors after the Meiji Restoration (1868).

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1920 item #1082261
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This item is currently being auctioned

This small jade or hard stone carving of a stylized face measures 2.25 inches x 2.75 inches x 1.5 inches in depth.

It's colors range from a medium to dark green to a pale green with areas of translucence. It also has natural inclusions in the stone with areas of dark brown or off white oxidation.

It is carved in the style of old Olmec carvings, but it may be early 20th century. It may also be Chinese, rather than Latin American in origin, but neither origin has been documented yet.

It is unusual in that it has a mounting bracket extending from the reverse side. Similar brackets have been seen on occasion to allow for mounting as architectural components or as decorations in religious settings.

If this stylized carving actually is older than our estimate, it would be worth a great deal more than our asking price.

The mounting bracket would allow for this piece to be worn as a belt slide or buckle, or as a large pendant.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pre 1900 item #604521
Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

These two museum quality cloisonne enameled censors in the shape of cockerels or mythological birds are a matched pair.

Each one measures 17 inches tall by 13 inches wide by 6 inches in depth.

They are very ornate with fan tails.

Their large, ornate tails are removable, opening them for a possible use as incense burners.

They date from the Ching Dynasty (1644-1911).

They are in outstanding condition, period.

They are covered with double facing dragon and phoenix designs (the symbols of the emperor and empress). They also have archaic plant and bird designs overall.

NOTE: These are outstanding and much more impressive in person than the photos would indicate.

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On May 30th, 2012 Christie's Hong Kong offered a pair of cloisonne roosters (14 inch tall) from the 18th century( Qianlong period) at an estimate of $370,000.00-$450,000.00. They were in a standing position -versus the position of repose of the pair we are offering.

Ancient -Eyes
$595.00

This is a Tibetan copper & white metal/silver prayer box or portable shrine (Gao) with a small bronze figure of Ganesh inside.

It dates circa 1890-1930, or possibly earlier.

It also has stitched covers from the early to middle 20th Century.

The front cover is covered with wonderfully hand tooled images, including a Tibetan mythical beast or lion surrounded by Buddhist calligraphy, topped by a flame. The rest of the box is copper, under the protective, stitched cover.

It measures 5 inches tall by 4 1/4 inches wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth.

It is part of a small collection of antique Asian silver artifacts that were originally acquired together. Some of these items will also be offered for sale, now or at a later date.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Stoneware : Pre 1837 VR item #565889
Ancient -Eyes
$6,400.00

This glazed ceramic seated Buddha measures 7 inches tall by 6 1/2 inches wide by about 5 inches in depth.

It consists of a blue glaze over buff ceramic. The glaze is a deep sky blue ranging to shades of turquoise and pooling to black in the crevices. The bottom has a very fine mesh pattern embedded in it that resembles linen. There are no marks of any kind on it.

This seated figure dates to the Kangxi period of the Ching Dynasty (1644-1911) or possibly earlier.

It is in excellent condition, period.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1700 item #173287 (stock #TR0251)
Ancient -Eyes
$2,400.00

This outstanding quality Ding Yao covered ceramic box, although Song Dynasty in appearance, may actually date from the Ming or Ching Dynasty.

It measures 8 inches in diameter by about 3 inches in height.

The domed cover is incised with repeating leaf patterns around a central leaf set within a circle.

It is in excellent condition with a circular kiln fracture around the outside of the bottom rim (see enlargement photo). This is original to the piece and is not considered damage.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #1099141
Ancient -Eyes
$32,000.00

This large jadeite carving of Guanyin (Kwan Yin) measures 4.5 inches wide by 3.5 inches in depth by 12.5 inches tall (including the period carved wooden base it sits on).

We estimate the jade itself to be about 11.5 inches tall without the stand. It sits about a half inch down in the stand and is bolted down (actually bolted down to the stand) (Someone was VERY careful with this old jade).

It is carved fom one piece of multicolored apple green jade with various shades of green flowing through it and a wonderfully rich color on it's face. It also has a few small inclusions of very dark green jade near it's base. These are all natural colors. This is NOT a color enhanced jade, guaranteed.

It dates from the late 18th century through the latter part of the 19th century.

It is in excellent condtion with no losses or repairs. It does have some natural inclusions on it's reverse that could be mistaken for damage. Be assured, they are natural fissures in the stone that have oxidized over the last century or so.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Pre 1800 item #1206291
Ancient -Eyes
$4,500.00

This fine bronze ewer or kettle (aftaba) dates to the 18th Century in Wughal India.

It is of typical form and good weight. It measures: height: 26cm, width: 24cm.

It has a prominent faceted spout along with its original lid with a bud-like finial, an 'S' shaped handle which has a stylized lion head at one end and a lotus bud finial at the other. It stands on four short feet.

The flattened, globular pear shaped body tapers to a long neck. The body has been cast with raised cloud or foliage borders to the top and bottom, The design work on the body is of better quality than usually seen. The body, lid and spout have been engraved overall with repeated stylized vegetable or poppy motifs. The lid has similar patterns.

Ewers of this type originated in Persia and the Middle East. Typical Islamic ewers comprised a central chamber to which a spout, foot, handle and neck were attached. They permitted water to flow - notations in the Koran described flowing water as 'clean'.

Ewers were introduced to India by Muslim invaders during the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. Later Indian inspired designs became more curvaceous and many were decorated  with lush plant and floral motifs.

In India, local Muslims used such vessels for hand washing. They became a practical tool of hospitality, being used to welcome visitors by pouring scented water over the hands and feet and into a basin, and took on a great variety of shapes and types whilst adhering to the basic ewer form.

This example is in excellent condition. There are no repairs, splits or dents. as mentioned, the lid is original – usually the lid is missing or replaced.

A slightly larger (39.4 cm tall) sold at Sotheby's on October 5, 2011 for 6250 British pounds( $9784.00 in US dollars) (lot 265) . It had much less surface detailing. ( http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2011/arts-of-the-islamic-world/lot.265.html )

Provenance: The southern California art market prior to 1980.

Reference: Zebrowski, M., Gold, Silver & Bronze from Mughal India, Alexandria Press, 1997.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #893016
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$8,000.00

This Japanese painted bronze figure of Daikoku measures approximately 13.5 inches tall by 6 inches wide by 5 inches in depth.

It is a substantial bronze figure, weighing around 13+ pounds or about 6 kilos.

It is signed or marked on both the figure and the separate base of rice bales (see two of the enlargement pictures).

It dates from the late Meiji to Taisho Period (circa 1890-1912).

It is in excellent condition with most of it's original colored and patinated surfaces intact. An exception to this is the loss of a small triangular shaped piece which was apparently once attached at the figure's midsection (see photo enlargement of loss). This most likely was originally a separate attachment (see the drill hole?) in the shape of a small pouch (or treasure sack) which Daikoku traditionally carried.

Since the 17th century, Daikoku has been known as the Japanese god of wealth, the household and of farmers, although in earlier centuries he was considered a fierce protector deity (Mahakala).

In Japan, artwork of this deity usually shows him wearing a hood and standing on two bales of rice, carrying a sack of treasure and holding a magic mallet. Daikoku is often clad in robes, with a smile on his face.

In some traditions, Daikoku is also considered to be a provider of food, and images of him can still be found in monastery kitchens and in the kitchens of private homes. He is recognized by his wide face, smile, and a flat black hat.

He is often portrayed holding a golden mallet (called a Uchide Nokozuchi), also known as a magic money mallet, and is seen positioned on bales of rice, occasionally with mice nearby (mice signifying plentiful food).

Originally a Hindu deity called Mahakala, he was introduced to Japan in the ninth century, and merged with the Shinto deity of good harvests, Oo-kuninushi-no-Mikoto (or Okuninushi-no-Kami, translated as "Prince Plenty"). The lucky mallet in his right hand is called the uchide nokozuchi. This mallet is said to have magical properties that can produce anything desired when struck. Some stories say that coins fall out when he shakes his mallet. Others say that believers are granted their heart's desire by tapping a symbolic mallet on the ground three times and making a wish.

The symbol of the precious Buddhist Jewel, sometimes found on Daikoku's mallet or belt, represents the themes of wealth and unfolding possibility. It is said to give its holder the ability to see all things (like a crystal ball).

The precious jewel is one of the seven symbols of royal power in Buddhism. Daikokyu, himself is considered to be one of the seven household gods of Japan.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1187517
Ancient -Eyes
$6,500.00

This Chinese ceramic or porcelain charger measures 15-15.25 inches in diameter. It measures about 2.5 inches in depth.

It dates to the Qing Dynasty in China (1644-1911).

It is hand painted in the Famille Rose palette and design.

It has a black ground border with green scrolling leaves and foliage and rose to pink colored flowers.

The level of detail and the quality of the painting is exceptional.

It is in outstanding condition with no repairs or restoration. It has an amazing clear ring and there are no hidden or hairline cracks.

NOTE: It does have a small number of tiny flake losses to the painting. They are not significant and can be seen in the photographs- if you look closely. They do not detract from it's overall appearance.

This has been in our personal collection for well over thirty years.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1492 item #665687
Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

This large bronze figure of Avalokitesvara dates somewhere between the Song Dynasty and the Ming Dynasty in China.

This figure represents one third of a Buddhist Triad, which may have originally been created as an altarpiece in a Buddhist temple.

This bronze figure measures 21 inches tall by 9 inches wide by 8 inches in depth. He/she is depicted wearing a Tang Dynasty upraised hair style and ornate robes and jeweled detailing.

It is in excellent condition with remnants of old gilt and colors remaining in areas. The head is completely covered with a layer of gold and the remainder is covered with a deep brown patina overall.

Traditionally, Avalokitesvara would sit on the left side of Amitabha Buddha in a three figure triad with Mahasthamaprapta sitting on the right side. There are engraved Chinese characterson the reverse side of it's base which translate as left two.

There are additional marks on the Gui held in front of the figure which may represent the date or the original donor of the bronze.

Since the side figures of a triad were smaller than the central figure,the central Buddha must have been fairly large. This fits with the theory of an origin in a temple or possibly a very wealthy home.

In Chinese Buddhism the Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara is also known as Guanyin. Among the Chinese, Avalokitesvara is almost exclusively called Guanshiyin Pusa. Some Daoist scriptures give her the title of Guanyin Dashi, and sometimes informally as Guanyin Fozu.

In Chinese Buddhism, the worship of Guanyin as a goddess by the populace is generally not in conflict with the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara's nature. In fact the widespread worship of Guanyin as a "Goddess of Mercy and Compassion" is seen as the boundless salvific nature of bodhisattva Avalokitesvara at work. The Buddhist canon states that bodhisattvas can assume whatsoever gender and form is needed to liberate beings from ignorance

This museum quality gilt bronze figure was purchased from an old collection of Asian antiques originally formed during the early portion of the 20th century.

The authenticity of this bronze is guaranteed without exception.