ANCIENT- EYES
Ancient -Eyes
$595.00

This antique bronze figure of the Monkey God Hanuman measures 5 x 4 x 1 1/2 inches (13 x 10 x 3 cm).

It is in excellent condition.

This ancient bronze figure was most likely crafted in Northern India, Tibet or Nepal.

We are dating it to the 17th - 18th century, although it may actually be much earlier, based on it's stylistic similarities with small Pala period bronze figures.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #1099141
Ancient -Eyes
$32,000.00

This large jadeite carving of Guanyin (Kwan Yin) measures 4.5 inches wide by 3.5 inches in depth by 12.5 inches tall (including the period carved wooden base it sits on).

We estimate the jade itself to be about 11.5 inches tall without the stand. It sits about a half inch down in the stand and is bolted down (actually bolted down to the stand) (Someone was VERY careful with this old jade).

It is carved fom one piece of multicolored apple green jade with various shades of green flowing through it and a wonderfully rich color on it's face. It also has a few small inclusions of very dark green jade near it's base. These are all natural colors. This is NOT a color enhanced jade, guaranteed.

It dates from the late 18th century through the latter part of the 19th century.

It is in excellent condtion with no losses or repairs. It does have some natural inclusions on it's reverse that could be mistaken for damage. Be assured, they are natural fissures in the stone that have oxidized over the last century or so.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #586936
Ancient -Eyes
$650.00

This Chinese Export or Chinoiserie lacquered wooden box measures 7 1/4 inches by 5 1/4 inches by 1 3/4 inches.

It dates from the late 18th century to middle 19th century.

It is hand painted with a scene of five figures in a pagoda and garden landscape. The figures are painted in gold over a black lacquer and wood base.

It is in very good condition except for a few very minor cracks and small losses to the lacquer.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Eskimo : Sculpture : Pre 1837 VR item #820826
Ancient -Eyes
$16,000.00

This original carved "oosik" or penis bone measures about 11 inches long by 1 inch wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth at it's wide at the base.

Although it has the appearance of ivory, it is actually carved from heavily fossilized walrus penile bone. It is much harder than traditional ivory and as such has been used by native people for generations to producing knives and important implements.

This is likely a fertility totem in as much as it has a hooded woman riding a phallus with the raven and a stylized bear above her.

A work of this quality would have taken a great deal of time talent and effort to create.

The workmanship and details of the carving are outstanding and can honestly be described as museum quality.

Ancient -Eyes
$2,400.00

This antique Persian Silver vase measures 7 inches tall (17 cm) by 5 1/2 inches in diameter (14.5 cm).

It dates circa 1700-1850 or earlier.

It is finely engraved with alternating medallions of bird in an ornate floral landscape and medallions of symmetrical calligraphy. Between the medallions are additional engraved floral wreaths

There are three silver hallmarks on the base. The usual standard of Persian silver is .84 or 84/100 pure silver.

Condition is excellent except for a small bung (see enlargement). Overall, this is an outstanding work of art and much nicer than my poor photos would indicate. Any color changes in the photos are from the flash and not on the vase itself.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #1161786
Ancient -Eyes
$2,495.00

This carved jade dog in a reclining position measures 3.25 inches long by about 1.25 inches tall by 1.5 inches in depth.

It is carved from a piece of nephrite jade that has colors that range from off white and pale celadon to pale yellow and brown in areas.

It dates from the late 19th to early 20th Century in China.

It is in excellent condition with no damage or restoration.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #1161393
Ancient -Eyes
This item is currently being auctioned

This Qing Dynasty Chinese carved jade double tube vase or nuptial cup measures just slightly less than 7 inches tall by about 4 inches wide by 3 inches in depth.

It is also known as a "Champion Vase".

It is carved from one piece of celadon colored nephrite jade with inclusion of lighter jade that give it the appearance of cloud formations. It also has a few rust colored inclusions that follow the natural inclusions of the stone.

It is carved in the shape of a mythological bird or phoenix standing on a Chinese lion or Chilung while holding two ornately carved tubular vases with its wings. The lids of both vases are conjoined by a dragon wrapped around both sides.

Double jade carvings of this type have been described not only as “Marriage or Nuptial Cups”, but also as “Champion Vases” by their owners over the centuries.

These are quite rare and can be found in museum collections throughout the world. There is a jade champion vase in the Victoria and Albert museum in England.

There is also one at the National Palace Museum in Taiwan.

Prices for similar but not absolutely identical jade champion vases have been increasing over the last decade or so. There are major similarities in most all of these vases but the minor details often vary from one to the next.

On November 1, 2004 , Christies Hong Kong sold a calcified green jade Champion vase for $80,256.00 against an estimate of $25,831.00- $38, 746.00 (sale 2177-Lot 834).

On November 27, 2007, Christies Hong Kong sold a white jade Champion vase for $248,842.00 (sale 2388-Lot 1547). It had an estimate of $38,730.00 - $51,640.00. It was 5 1/8 inches tall ( 13 cm).It was exceptional and from a well known collection.

On March 18, 2008, Christies Auction House sold a Champion Vase of somewhat similar appearance for $50,000.00 US (Christies: Sale 2267-Lot #440) It was 5 7/8 inches tall. On June 12, 2012, another jade Champion vase was sold for $64,000.00 (Christies –Sale 3509 /Lot #161). It was 5 1/8 inches tall.

Another jade champion vase is scheduled to go up to auction very soon ( Christies NY- September 13, 2012 ( sale 2580- Lot # ?). It is estimated to bring $50,000.00-$70,000.00. _________________________________________________________________________________

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1800 item #850231
Ancient -Eyes
$795.00

This is an original pair of 18th-19th century wooden carvings of Chinese eunichs or officials. Each one measures 8.5 inches tall, 3 inches wide and 2.5 inches deep (at the base). They are in good condition with most of the original painted detailing remaining on their faces and painted details remaining in other areas, such as the hat, sash, and ceremonial jade disk held by one of them. One figure holds what appears to be a representation of an old ceremonial jade. These appear to have been tomb figures that lost much of their original colors. The blue of the robes may be restoration.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1800 item #1107919
Ancient -Eyes
This item is currently being auctioned

Pair of Imperial Bronze Dragon Seals: Qianlong Marks and Period

This large pair of dragon handled bronze seals date from the period of Qianlong (1735-1795), emperor of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) in China.

The rectangular base measures 8 ½ inches by 7 ¼ inches (21.5 cm x 19.5 cm). The dragon handle stands up about 3 inches tall (8 cm.).

The top portions of the seals are covered with chiseled and engraved patterns of dragons and swirling lines representing the ocean or the sky. Standing on top of all this is the dragon handle.

The bottom of the seals are covered in archaic old Chinese pictogram script (see closeup photos). They also include traditional Chinese characters in one corner which are easily interpreted as Qianlong Reign Marks.

Some folks thought these might be paperweights because of their rather large size, compared to most seals of either bronze or jade. A recent article in the Jakarta Post referred to a very similar bronze seal as a “casted paperweight from the Qianlong Period”. See link below:

( http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011/04/04/scholar-objects-undervalued-small-treasures.html )

These bronzes may have served double duty, with an original purpose yet to be determined by deciphering the archaic script and the possibility of also having been used as massive scroll weights.

The Emperor Qianlong had a serious interest in painting and was known to dabble in it himself on occasion. Some scrolls are exceptionally long and might have required a substantial scroll weight to keep them open for viewing (or possible two or more to hold the whole long thing open in the privacy of one's palace).

On April 4, 2010 , one identical bronze seal/scroll weight was sold at auction in China for the amount of RMB 651,200. (about $108,000.00 US ). The auction estimate had originally been 600,000-800,000 RMB (about $100,000-$130,000) for one single bronze seal.

The pair of bronze seals or scroll weights or “paperweights” are both in excellent condition. The buyer will not be disappointed.

They were purchased about 30 years ago in Southern California.

NOTE: Although the photos below make the the bronzes appear to be of different sizes , only the photos are of different sizes, not the bronzes themselves.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: THERE ARE A FEW VERY TINY SPOTS OF VERDIGRIS ON ONE OF THE SEALS . THIS IS NOT UNUSUAL FOR A BRONZE ITEM THAT IS OVER 200 YEARS OLD. IT IS REALLY NOT WORTH MENTIONING BUT WE ALWAYS LIKE TO HAVE FULL DISCLOSURE SO THERE ARE NO SURPRISES FOR THE BUYER.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #326723 (stock #Jap-1001)
Ancient -Eyes
$695.00

This Japanese Carved Wooden Mask measures 10 inches tall by 7 3/4 inches wide (ear to ear) by 4 inches in depth. It is also about 1 1/2 inches in thickness at center narrowing down to about 3/4 inch thick at edges.

It is carved from a tightly grained wood similar to those found in 19th century Japanese furniture.

It has a nice patina and retains traces of original pale maroon color in some areas.

It is in excellent condition and has wonderful parallel grooves over entire interior: most likely carving marks, but very finely detailed. They do not show up well in photos.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #877532
Ancient -Eyes
$395.00

This Japanese Satsuma pitcher or condiment jar measures about 6 inches tall by 4 inches in diameter at it's widest point.

It dates from the late 19th century-early 20th Century( Meiji Period) (circa 1880-1915).

It is in excellent condition with some minor losses to the gilding on the handle.

It is covered overall with a finely detailed series of patterns, which include a bird and dragon motif with fans.

Based on it's rounded and smoothed edges, it appears that this small vessel never originally had a permanent top or stopper.

It is unmarked as to maker or country of origin . This one fact helps to date it pre 1895 when US import export laws were established. After that date it would have had to have been marked as to country of origin.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1220077
Ancient -Eyes
$295.00

This Japanese bronze handled mirror measures about 8 inches in diameter (21cm) with an extended handle which increases the full height to about 12 inches or 30 centimeters(cm).

It dates to the late Edo Period or Early Meiji period ( about the middle of the 19th century (1840-1860).

It is signed in the left portion of the front. It also has birds flying over churning waves in the ocean.

It still has most of it's silver ovrlay on the two large Kanji marks on the front. It also has remnants of it's silver on the reverse or "Face" of the mirror.

Bronze mirrors were introduced into Japan from China and Korea about 300 BC - AD 300.

At first they had a religious function and were regarded as symbols of authority.

The Japanese soon learned to make their own mirrors using lost-wax casting and decorated them with Japanese or Chinese designs.

By the Nara period (AD 710-794) mirrors were made for everyday use and used designs such as plants and animals to symbolize good fortune.

From the Kamakura period (1185-1333) a design showing Hôraizan (the Chinese 'Island of Immortality') became popular.. More new designs and the first handled mirrors appeared in the Muromachi period (1333-1568).

During the Edo period (1600-1868), mirrors decorated with lucky symbols or Chinese characters were given at weddings. Mirrors became larger as hairstyles became more ornate; some mirrors in Kabuki theatre dressing-rooms were up to fifty centimetres across and were placed on stands. The faces of mirrors were highly polished or burnished, with itinerant tinners and polishers specializing in this work. Since the mirror, together with the sword and the jewel, were symbols of Imperial power, mirror-makers were deeply revered and often given honorary titles such as Tenka-Ichi ('First under Heaven'). However, this title was often misused and was officially prohibited in 1682. Bronze mirrors were replaced by glass mirrors after the Meiji Restoration (1868).

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1700 item #173287 (stock #TR0251)
Ancient -Eyes
$2,400.00

This outstanding quality Ding Yao covered ceramic box, although Song Dynasty in appearance, may actually date from the Ming or Ching Dynasty.

It measures 8 inches in diameter by about 3 inches in height.

The domed cover is incised with repeating leaf patterns around a central leaf set within a circle.

It is in excellent condition with a circular kiln fracture around the outside of the bottom rim (see enlargement photo). This is original to the piece and is not considered damage.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Pre 1800 item #1206291
Ancient -Eyes
$4,500.00

This fine bronze ewer or kettle (aftaba) dates to the 18th Century in Wughal India.

It is of typical form and good weight. It measures: height: 26cm, width: 24cm.

It has a prominent faceted spout along with its original lid with a bud-like finial, an 'S' shaped handle which has a stylized lion head at one end and a lotus bud finial at the other. It stands on four short feet.

The flattened, globular pear shaped body tapers to a long neck. The body has been cast with raised cloud or foliage borders to the top and bottom, The design work on the body is of better quality than usually seen. The body, lid and spout have been engraved overall with repeated stylized vegetable or poppy motifs. The lid has similar patterns.

Ewers of this type originated in Persia and the Middle East. Typical Islamic ewers comprised a central chamber to which a spout, foot, handle and neck were attached. They permitted water to flow - notations in the Koran described flowing water as 'clean'.

Ewers were introduced to India by Muslim invaders during the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. Later Indian inspired designs became more curvaceous and many were decorated  with lush plant and floral motifs.

In India, local Muslims used such vessels for hand washing. They became a practical tool of hospitality, being used to welcome visitors by pouring scented water over the hands and feet and into a basin, and took on a great variety of shapes and types whilst adhering to the basic ewer form.

This example is in excellent condition. There are no repairs, splits or dents. as mentioned, the lid is original – usually the lid is missing or replaced.

A slightly larger (39.4 cm tall) sold at Sotheby's on October 5, 2011 for 6250 British pounds( $9784.00 in US dollars) (lot 265) . It had much less surface detailing. ( http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2011/arts-of-the-islamic-world/lot.265.html )

Provenance: The southern California art market prior to 1980.

Reference: Zebrowski, M., Gold, Silver & Bronze from Mughal India, Alexandria Press, 1997.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1900 item #603086
Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

This blue glazed on buff colored ceramic or pottery figure of a seated Buddha measures just over 4 inches tall by 2 1/2 inches wide by 1 1/4 inches in depth.

It is in excellent condition with the glaze pooling to black in the crevices.

It dates to the Qing (Ching) Dynasty (1644-1911).

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #105013 (stock #TR0175)
Ancient -Eyes
$375.00

This blue & white ceramic bottle or jar measures 9 inches tall by 3 1/4 inches in diameter.

It is hand painted with scenes in cobalt blue on a white ground.

It is in excellent condition with a few natural fissures and irregularities to the glaze (see close up photos).

We estimate it to date circa 1700-1900.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #656890
Ancient -Eyes
$2,695.00

This standing nephrite jade carving of a bearded and robed figure with long horns or a headdress of some sort measures about 10 1/2 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth.

It is carved from a large piece of nephrite ranging from pale to deep green with a strip of oxidized white to yellow jade down the middle. In addition, there is a crackled stripe of oxidation running down through the center of the face through the figure to the bottom of the robe.

There are also engraved rectangular patterns and additional patterns on the robe.

Although the serious possibility exists that this is an old nephrite carving dating to the Shang period, we are dating this one very conservatively to about circa 1900-1920. If it turns out to be much older, we are certain the buyer will not be too upset.

It is interesting to note, however, that the oxidation and subsequent crackling of the stone that runs right down through the face probably occurred after the jade was carved. The question arises: if this is a copy made in the last 100 years or so, why didn't they turn it around before they carved the face, as the center of the back side is pristine where the face could have been positioned, no crackling or deterioration? It would have been the better choice to use as the front and would have made a more attractive and potentially more saleable copy. If however, the deterioration of the stone actually happened over an extended period of time after it was carved, that would make more sense as an explanation as to why the current positioning of the stone in relation to it's natural flaws or irregularities.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Sculpture : Pre 1492 item #570738
Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

This ancient marble carving of a reclining lion measures 6 1/2 inches wide by 5 inches in depth by 4 1/2 inches high.

It dates to either the Tang Dynasty in China (618 AD 907 AD) or slightly earlier in one of the Roman provinces ( possibly 300-400 AD). It is in excellent condition and quite rare.