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All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1800 item #354954
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This is an antique jade carving of a seated monkey holding a Peach (Late Ming to Qing Dynasty)

It is a finely polished blue grey nephrite jade with white jade areas utilized to accent the nose and extremities.

There are remnants of oxidation or calcification in the crevices.

This antique carved jade is in outstanding condition. It is an excellent example of 17th-19th century jade carving.

Subject is a seated monkey with a finger in his mouth, holding a peach

3 1/4 x 1 1/2 X 1 1/2 inches (79mm x 40mm x 42 mm)

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #1161393
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Price on Request

This Qing Dynasty Chinese carved jade double tube vase or nuptial cup measures just slightly less than 7 inches tall by about 4 inches wide by 3 inches in depth.

It is also known as a "Champion Vase".

It is carved from one piece of celadon colored nephrite jade with inclusion of lighter jade that give it the appearance of cloud formations. It also has a few rust colored inclusions that follow the natural inclusions of the stone.

It is carved in the shape of a mythological bird or phoenix standing on a Chinese lion or Chilung while holding two ornately carved tubular vases with its wings. The lids of both vases are conjoined by a dragon wrapped around both sides.

Double jade carvings of this type have been described not only as “Marriage or Nuptial Cups”, but also as “Champion Vases” by their owners over the centuries.

These are quite rare and can be found in museum collections throughout the world. There is a jade champion vase in the Victoria and Albert museum in England.

There is also one at the National Palace Museum in Taiwan.

Prices for similar but not absolutely identical jade champion vases have been increasing over the last decade or so. There are major similarities in most all of these vases but the minor details often vary from one to the next.

On November 1, 2004 , Christies Hong Kong sold a calcified green jade Champion vase for $80,256.00 against an estimate of $25,831.00- $38, 746.00 (sale 2177-Lot 834).

On November 27, 2007, Christies Hong Kong sold a white jade Champion vase for $248,842.00 (sale 2388-Lot 1547). It had an estimate of $38,730.00 - $51,640.00. It was 5 1/8 inches tall ( 13 cm).It was exceptional and from a well known collection.

On March 18, 2008, Christies Auction House sold a Champion Vase of somewhat similar appearance for $50,000.00 US (Christies: Sale 2267-Lot #440) It was 5 7/8 inches tall. On June 12, 2012, another jade Champion vase was sold for $64,000.00 (Christies –Sale 3509 /Lot #161). It was 5 1/8 inches tall.

Another jade champion vase is scheduled to go up to auction very soon ( Christies NY- September 13, 2012 (sale 2580- Lot # ?). Estimated Value: $50,000.00-$70,000.00. _________________________________________________________________________________

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre 1900 item #587249
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$1,495.00

This unusual painted lacquer and carved Shibiyama panel measures about 15 1/4 inches by 12 inches by 1/2 inch thick. It has an outstanding pattern of carved and inlaid pieces creating a finely detailed picture of birds and flowers on a deep sky blue oval background. It is surrounded by raised gilt and vermillion lacquer paintings of fruit and plants.

It dates to the late 19th century or Meiji Period in Japan.

It has an inset, carved rectangle with the artist's signature in the lower left corner of the blue lacquer oval.

It may have originally been the cover to a book or woodblock print album.

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$2,400.00

This antique Persian Silver vase measures 7 inches tall (17 cm) by 5 1/2 inches in diameter (14.5 cm).

It dates circa 1700-1850 or earlier.

It is finely engraved with alternating medallions of bird in an ornate floral landscape and medallions of symmetrical calligraphy. Between the medallions are additional engraved floral wreaths

There are three silver hallmarks on the base. The usual standard of Persian silver is .84 or 84/100 pure silver.

Condition is excellent except for a small bung (see enlargement). Overall, this is an outstanding work of art and much nicer than my poor photos would indicate. Any color changes in the photos are from the flash and not on the vase itself.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1920 item #861861
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$1,495.00

This jadeite carving measures about 3.5 x 5 inches by .5 inches in depth. It is in the shape of a rectangular plaque with slightly rounded edges.

It features a robed figure of Buddha holding a large lotus leaf while another figure kneels beside him.

This jadeite carving is in excellent condition .

It has colors that range from pale green to variegated colors that include a bright apple green, deep moss green and touches of emerald green.

The colors of the stone have been used to good effect to make the Buddha stand out on the obverse. On the reverse two large lotus leaves are framed utilizing the natural colors of the stone.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1220077
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$295.00

This Japanese bronze handled mirror measures about 8 inches in diameter (21cm) with an extended handle which increases the full height to about 12 inches or 30 centimeters(cm).

It dates to the late Edo Period or Early Meiji period ( about the middle of the 19th century (1840-1860).

It is signed in the left portion of the front. It also has birds flying over churning waves in the ocean.

It still has most of it's silver ovrlay on the two large Kanji marks on the front. It also has remnants of it's silver on the reverse or "Face" of the mirror.

Bronze mirrors were introduced into Japan from China and Korea about 300 BC - AD 300.

At first they had a religious function and were regarded as symbols of authority.

The Japanese soon learned to make their own mirrors using lost-wax casting and decorated them with Japanese or Chinese designs.

By the Nara period (AD 710-794) mirrors were made for everyday use and used designs such as plants and animals to symbolize good fortune.

From the Kamakura period (1185-1333) a design showing Hôraizan (the Chinese 'Island of Immortality') became popular.. More new designs and the first handled mirrors appeared in the Muromachi period (1333-1568).

During the Edo period (1600-1868), mirrors decorated with lucky symbols or Chinese characters were given at weddings. Mirrors became larger as hairstyles became more ornate; some mirrors in Kabuki theatre dressing-rooms were up to fifty centimetres across and were placed on stands. The faces of mirrors were highly polished or burnished, with itinerant tinners and polishers specializing in this work. Since the mirror, together with the sword and the jewel, were symbols of Imperial power, mirror-makers were deeply revered and often given honorary titles such as Tenka-Ichi ('First under Heaven'). However, this title was often misused and was officially prohibited in 1682. Bronze mirrors were replaced by glass mirrors after the Meiji Restoration (1868).

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Pre 1800 item #1206291
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Price on Request

This fine bronze ewer or kettle (aftaba) dates to the 18th Century in Mughal India.

It is of typical form and good weight. It measures: height: 26cm, width: 24cm.

It has a prominent faceted spout along with its original lid with a bud-like finial, an 'S' shaped handle which has a stylized lion head at one end and a lotus bud finial at the other. It stands on four short feet.

The flattened, globular pear shaped body tapers to a long neck. The body has been cast with raised cloud or foliage borders to the top and bottom, The design work on the body is of better quality than usually seen. The body, lid and spout have been engraved overall with repeated stylized vegetable or poppy motifs. The lid has similar patterns.

Ewers of this type originated in Persia and the Middle East. Typical Islamic ewers comprised a central chamber to which a spout, foot, handle and neck were attached. They permitted water to flow - notations in the Koran described flowing water as 'clean'.

Ewers were introduced to India by Muslim invaders during the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. Later Indian inspired designs became more curvaceous and many were decorated  with lush plant and floral motifs.

In India, local Muslims used such vessels for hand washing. They became a practical tool of hospitality, being used to welcome visitors by pouring scented water over the hands and feet and into a basin, and took on a great variety of shapes and types whilst adhering to the basic ewer form.

This example is in excellent condition. There are no repairs, splits or dents. as mentioned, the lid is original – usually the lid is missing or replaced.

A slightly larger (39.4 cm tall) sold at Sotheby's on October 5, 2011 for 6250 British pounds( $9784.00 in US dollars) (lot 265) . It had much less surface detailing. ( http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2011/arts-of-the-islamic-world/lot.265.html )

Provenance: The southern California art market prior to 1980.

Reference: Zebrowski, M., Gold, Silver & Bronze from Mughal India, Alexandria Press, 1997.

Ancient -Eyes
$595.00

This is a Tibetan copper & white metal/silver prayer box or portable shrine (Gao) with a small bronze figure of Ganesh inside.

It dates circa 1890-1930, or possibly earlier.

It also has stitched covers from the early to middle 20th Century.

The front cover is covered with wonderfully hand tooled images, including a Tibetan mythical beast or lion surrounded by Buddhist calligraphy, topped by a flame. The rest of the box is copper, under the protective, stitched cover.

It measures 5 inches tall by 4 1/4 inches wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth.

It is part of a small collection of antique Asian silver artifacts that were originally acquired together. Some of these items will also be offered for sale, now or at a later date.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #105013 (stock #TR0175)
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$375.00

This blue & white ceramic bottle or jar measures 9 inches tall by 3 1/4 inches in diameter.

It is hand painted with scenes in cobalt blue on a white ground.

It is in excellent condition with a few natural fissures and irregularities to the glaze (see close up photos).

We estimate it to date circa 1700-1900.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #326723 (stock #Jap-1001)
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$695.00

This Japanese Carved Wooden Mask measures 10 inches tall by 7 3/4 inches wide (ear to ear) by 4 inches in depth. It is also about 1 1/2 inches in thickness at center narrowing down to about 3/4 inch thick at edges.

It is carved from a tightly grained wood similar to those found in 19th century Japanese furniture.

It has a nice patina and retains traces of original pale maroon color in some areas.

It is in excellent condition and has wonderful parallel grooves over entire interior: most likely carving marks, but very finely detailed. They do not show up well in photos.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1800 item #850231
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$795.00

This is an original pair of 18th-19th century wooden carvings of Chinese eunuchs or officials. Each one measures 8.5 inches tall, 3 inches wide and 2.5 inches deep (at the base). They are in good condition with most of the original painted detailing remaining on their faces and some painted details remaining in other areas, such as the hat, sash, and ceremonial jade disk held by one of them. One figure holds what appears to be a representation of an old ceremonial jade. These appear to have been tomb figures that lost much of their original colors.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pre 1900 item #834235
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Price on Request

This large Chinese Cloisonne covered box measures 15 inches in diameter. It actually measures 17.5 inches wide, when you include the bronze handles on either side. It also measures 8 inches tall.

It is in excellent condition with the exception of a small circular restored spot on the bottom of the exterior. It appears to have been repaired in the late 19th century, based on the odd shade of green enamel that was used in the repair.

The cloisonne scene on the lid consists of a phoenix (fenghuang) looking down on a mountain range across the waters and under a red sun (a possible reference to Japan).

The chrysanthemums in the foreground may refer to Japanese royalty. This could have been designed as a gift for Japanese royalty.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #1161786
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$2,495.00

This carved jade dog in a reclining position measures 3.25 inches long by about 1.25 inches tall by 1.5 inches in depth.

It is carved from a piece of nephrite jade that has colors that range from off white and pale celadon to pale yellow and brown in areas.

It dates from the late 19th to early 20th Century in China.

It is in excellent condition with no damage or restoration.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #306175
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$2,800.00

This original, signed painting on wooden panel measures 17 1/2 inches by 18 inches (44cm x 46 cm) not including the ornately carved wooden frame it sits in. With frame, it measures 23 1/2 by 24 inches.

The subject of the painting is two samurai with drawn blades.

It is signed on both the front and reverse of the painting. There is also an additional hand painted seal in the upper right corner.

We date this painting to the late Meiji Period, although it is quite possible that it could be much earlier.

The condition of the painting is very good, but there are a few minor scrapes to the soft wood evident in the picture, but only from a certain angle. They really do not detract from the charm of this outstanding work.

Last, but not least, the frame is an amazing example of wood carving, and in outstanding condition.

Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

This museum quality silvered bronze Nepalese or Sino-Tibetan figure of Tara (also known as Kuan Yin or Guanyin) dates to the 14th to 15th century or earlier.

It stands 10 1/2 inches tall by 3 inches in diameter.

It has exquisite details and very subtle modeling.

It is in excellent condition and retains much of it's original silver finish.

A similar example can be seen in "Oriental Art: India, Nepal & Tibet" by Michael Ridley, 1970, Plate 37 (listed as 14th Century or earlier).

Ancient -Eyes
$595.00

This antique bronze figure of the Monkey God Hanuman measures 5 x 4 x 1 1/2 inches (13 x 10 x 3 cm).

It is in excellent condition.

This ancient bronze figure was most likely crafted in Northern India, Tibet or Nepal.

We are dating it to the 17th - 18th century, although it may actually be much earlier, based on it's stylistic similarities with small Pala period bronze figures.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1800 item #1121793
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This bronze figure of Jambhala (also known as Vaisravana) measures about 11.5 inches tall by 9 inches wide by 5 inches in depth (including the bronze lotus mount and lion that it sits on).

He is commonly considered to be the god of wealth and protector of the north, riding on a lion.

A mongoose sits on a lotus under his left foot.

His right hand holds a citron or lemon (a symbol of fertility).

The character of Jambhala or Vaisavana is founded upon the Hindu deity Kubera, but although the Buddhist and Hindu deities share some characteristics, each of them has different functions and associated myths.

Although brought into East Asia as a Buddhist deity, Vaisravana has become a character in folk religion and has acquired an identity that is independent of the Buddhist tradition .

Vaisravana is the guardian of the northern direction, and his home is in the northern quadrant of the topmost tier of the lower half of Mount Sumeru. He is the leader of all the yaksas who dwell on the Sumeru's slopes.

He is often portrayed with a yellow face.

He is also sometimes displayed with a mongoose, often shown ejecting jewels from its mouth.

The mongoose is the enemy of the snake, a symbol of greed or hatred; the ejection of jewels represents generosity.

In Tibet, Vaisravana is considered a worldly dharmapala or protector of the Dharma, a member of the retinue of Ratnasambhava.

He is also known as the King of the North. As guardian of the north, he is often depicted on temple murals outside the main door.

He is also thought of as a god of wealth. As such, he is sometimes portrayed carrying a citron(a type of lemon), the fruit of the jambhara tree, a pun on another name of his, Jambhala . The fruit helps distinguish him iconically from depictions of Kuvera.

He is sometimes represented as corpulent and covered with jewels.

His mount is a snow lion.

This intricate bronze has much of it's original over painting remaining on the faces of both Jambala and his mount. There is a large amount of gilding applied to jeweled portions and accent details. This was a style of decoration that was popular during the later portion of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and also occasionally during the early portion of the Qing Dynasty( 1644-1912).

We estimate this antique bronze to date to the 17th or 18th century, but it may be a bit earlier than that.

This antique bronze is in excellent condition, with one exception. It sits on three mount pins that extend into the sealed lotus base. One of these pins has broken off and is apparently roaming around within the base itself. Sitting on two pins rather than three has had no adverse effect on it's stability whatsoever.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Eskimo : Sculpture : Pre 1837 VR item #820826
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$16,000.00

This original carved "oosik" or penis bone measures about 11 inches long by 1 inch wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth at it's wide at the base.

Although it has the appearance of ivory, it is actually carved from heavily fossilized walrus penile bone. It is much harder than traditional ivory and as such has been used by native people for generations to producing knives and important implements.

This is likely a fertility totem in as much as it has a hooded woman riding a phallus with the raven and a stylized bear above her.

A work of this quality would have taken a great deal of time talent and effort to create.

The workmanship and details of the carving are outstanding and can honestly be described as museum quality.