ANCIENT- EYES
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1800 item #850231
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$795.00

This is an original pair of 18th-19th century wooden carvings of Chinese eunuchs or officials. Each one measures 8.5 inches tall, 3 inches wide and 2.5 inches deep (at the base). They are in good condition with most of the original painted detailing remaining on their faces and some painted details remaining in other areas, such as the hat, sash, and ceremonial jade disk held by one of them. One figure holds what appears to be a representation of an old ceremonial jade. These appear to have been tomb figures that lost much of their original colors.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1492 item #1084482
Ancient -Eyes
Price on Request

Nepalese Bronze Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani

11th to 14th century: circa 1000-1300 AD.

This outstanding bronze statue of the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani stands 13.5 inches tall not including the two rectangular mounts that extend into it's bronze base.

It stands 15 inches tall including it's bronze lotus base.

It is in excellent condition with much of it's original gilt remaining on the raised areas and his face. The remainder of the original gilt has been lost over the last thousand years or so, exposing a deep copper colored bronze surface.

Among the many forms of Avalokiteshvara, Padmapani is probably the oldest.

Avalokiteshvara is the embodiment of all of the Buddha's infinite compassion.

Padmapani means "lotus in hand". His left hand holds the lotus stalk, while his right hand is lowered in the gesture of granting favors.

This is an early example the use of semi precious stone inlays, a distinctive feature of Tibetan and Nepali sculpture.

His smooth torso and broad shoulders reflect the impact of the Gupta style, which existed in Northern India from the fourth to sixth century. The armlets and crown are traditionally found on 10th to 12th century sculpture.

Additional Nepalese or Nepali scuptural traditions can be seen in the shape of the broad face and full cheekbones which differ from the smaller and fuller facial features found in Indian art. The curves of the eyebrows and eyes and the long line of the nose are also typically Nepalese in style. In addition, the delicately engraved or incised floral pattern of the sarong around his waist is also typically found on early Nepali sculptures .

A larger, but stylistically similar example of an 11th century bronze Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara Padmapani is held in the Cleveland Museum of Art:

On September 21, 2007 Christies NY sold a 14 inch gilt bronze Avalokitesvara Padmapani for $577,000.00 .

Recently - On March 20, 2012, a 17 7/8 inch tall bronze Padmapani was sold for $2.8 million dollars by Christies Auction House in New York.

THIS IS A MUSEUM QUALITY BRONZE AND IT IS GUARANTEED TO BE AS DESCRIBED, WITH NO EXCEPTIONS.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #82653 (stock #TR0112)
Ancient -Eyes
$1,295.00

This Japanese Satsuma Vase is unmarked, 15 inches tall and about 9 inches in diameter.

It dates to the Meiji Period (1868-1912) and has Kwannon and Lohans with an elephant pictured upon it.

It is in excellent condition with some light rubbing on the high relief gilded areas exposing an outstanding crackle beneath.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : India : Pre 1800 item #83811 (stock #TR0122)
Ancient -Eyes
$3,600.00

This antique bronze head of Kandoba or Shiva with a Naga canopy dates from 18th century India (Rajastan).

This may also be known as a Muhkalinga.

It measures approximately 10 inches (24 cm) tall and 5 inches (12 cm) in diameter.

This is a very substantial old bronze in both weight and appearance and it is in excellent condition.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre AD 1000 item #523969
Ancient -Eyes
$4,500.00

This extremely old hardstone / jade bracelet dates from the Liangzhu Period (3300 BC-2200 BC).

It is a varigated black color with one spot of pale yellow green on the interior.

It is in excellent condition, even though its material has been been degraded over time (The scratch test only works on the green spot due to the degradation of the darker areas). It also has a crystal structure that can be seen under high magnification.

It has an outside diameter of 3 1/4 - 3 1/2 inches (8.5- 9 cm) and an interior diameter of 2 5/8 inches (6.6 cm). It is about 3/4 inch in width (1.8 - 2.0 cm). This is an outstanding piece and is similar in style to another burnt jade bangle of white chicken bone color in published works.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1700 item #173287 (stock #TR0251)
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$2,400.00

This outstanding quality Ding Yao covered ceramic box, although Song Dynasty in appearance, may actually date from the Ming or Ching Dynasty.

It measures 8 inches in diameter by about 3 inches in height.

The domed cover is incised with repeating leaf patterns around a central leaf set within a circle.

It is in excellent condition with a circular kiln fracture around the outside of the bottom rim (see enlargement photo). This is original to the piece and is not considered damage.

Ancient -Eyes
$360.00

This is a small, antique Tibetan copper & white metal or silver prayer box and /or portable shrine (Gao) with a small gold colored seated Buddha statue inside.

It dates circa 1890-1930.

It measures 3 1/3 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth.

The front cover is covered overall with wonderfully tooled reposse images, including a Tibetan beast or lion surrounded by Buddhist calligraphy, topped by a flame. The rest of the box is copper, under the protective, stitched cover.

It also has stitched covers from the early to middle 20th Century.

It is part of a small collection of antique Asian silver artifacts that were acquired a while ago. Please check our other listings to see additional items from this small but select collection that we are currently offering for sale.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #719023
Ancient -Eyes
$895.00

This Meiji period JAPANESE KUTANI VASE measures 7 inches in diameter and 11 inches tall. We date this one circa 1880-1910.

It is in excellent condition overall with the raised gilding in outstanding condition.

It is unsigned, but there is a hand painted mark on the bottom edge that looks like: I I I O .

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1800 item #354954
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Price on Request

This is an antique jade carving of a seated monkey holding a Peach (Late Ming to Qing Dynasty)

It is a finely polished blue grey nephrite jade with white jade areas utilized to accent the nose and extremities.

There are remnants of oxidation or calcification in the crevices.

This antique carved jade is in outstanding condition. It is an excellent example of 17th-19th century jade carving.

Subject is a seated monkey with a finger in his mouth, holding a peach

3 1/4 x 1 1/2 X 1 1/2 inches (79mm x 40mm x 42 mm)

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #95868 (stock #TR0156)
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This original Ming Dynasty ceramic or stoneware tile with a figure of a seated Buddha measures about 6 3/4 x 9 1/2 x 2 1/2 inches.

It is in very good condition with minor losses to the glaze in a few areas along with a few small rim chips.

Stylistically, it has more in common with Song Dynasty ceramics, but most likely it dates to the Ming Dynasty.

This architectural tile appears to have been designed to be mounted in the wall of a shrine or temple and has a pattern of large shaped dovetails on the reverse for that purpose (see enlargement photo).

This museum quality piece consists of very dense stoneware covered with colored glazes in turquoise, aubergine and yellow.

This Buddha tile dates from the Ming Dynasty or earlier.

A Few Facts:

The Shanyin Hall at the White Dagoba Temple was built or restored by the Qianlong emperor in 1751, 30 years after a large earthquake damaged the same area in Beijing.

Shanyin Hall currently has 445 Buddha tiles of similar style, but of later manufacture (probably circa 1976 -when it was last restored after the Tangshan earthquake.) (See the last photograph).

It may have have had tiles similar to the one we are offering prior to it's previous restorations in 1751 or 1976.

It is quite possible that this turquoise Buddha tile may be a remnant of one of those earlier changes or restorations.

We currently have in our collection a tile similar to the current tiles that are currently mounted in Shanyin Hall in Beijing. Our tile is marked with Wanli reign Marks (1573- 1619). This is not the tile we are offering with this lot. The one we are offering actually appears to be earlier than this Wanli tile, but it is unmarked.

We can't document it yet, but it is a serious possibility that this old Buddha tile dates to before 1619.

Our research shows that the original tiles were probably held in place with lime mortar-not the best thing to use in an earthquake zone.

This tile we offer here may have been salvaged from an old temple restoration or from a temple no longer in existence. This same area has seen earthquakes in 1679, again in 1730 and again in 1976-to name a few.

All of this is a combination of verifiable facts and speculation, but speculation based on observable and documented facts.

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Thank you for looking: William Brooks. (ancient-eyes)( www.ancient

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Himalayas : Pre 1800 item #1121793
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This bronze figure of Jambhala (also known as Vaisravana) measures about 11.5 inches tall by 9 inches wide by 5 inches in depth (including the bronze lotus mount and lion that it sits on).

He is commonly considered to be the god of wealth and protector of the north, riding on a lion.

A mongoose sits on a lotus under his left foot.

His right hand holds a citron or lemon (a symbol of fertility).

The character of Jambhala or Vaisavana is founded upon the Hindu deity Kubera, but although the Buddhist and Hindu deities share some characteristics, each of them has different functions and associated myths.

Although brought into East Asia as a Buddhist deity, Vaisravana has become a character in folk religion and has acquired an identity that is independent of the Buddhist tradition .

Vaisravana is the guardian of the northern direction, and his home is in the northern quadrant of the topmost tier of the lower half of Mount Sumeru. He is the leader of all the yaksas who dwell on the Sumeru's slopes.

He is often portrayed with a yellow face.

He is also sometimes displayed with a mongoose, often shown ejecting jewels from its mouth.

The mongoose is the enemy of the snake, a symbol of greed or hatred; the ejection of jewels represents generosity.

In Tibet, Vaisravana is considered a worldly dharmapala or protector of the Dharma, a member of the retinue of Ratnasambhava.

He is also known as the King of the North. As guardian of the north, he is often depicted on temple murals outside the main door.

He is also thought of as a god of wealth. As such, he is sometimes portrayed carrying a citron(a type of lemon), the fruit of the jambhara tree, a pun on another name of his, Jambhala . The fruit helps distinguish him iconically from depictions of Kuvera.

He is sometimes represented as corpulent and covered with jewels.

His mount is a snow lion.

This intricate bronze has much of it's original over painting remaining on the faces of both Jambala and his mount. There is a large amount of gilding applied to jeweled portions and accent details. This was a style of decoration that was popular during the later portion of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and also occasionally during the early portion of the Qing Dynasty( 1644-1912).

We estimate this antique bronze to date to the 17th or 18th century, but it may be a bit earlier than that.

This antique bronze is in excellent condition, with one exception. It sits on three mount pins that extend into the sealed lotus base. One of these pins has broken off and is apparently roaming around within the base itself. Sitting on two pins rather than three has had no adverse effect on it's stability whatsoever.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #1136994
Ancient -Eyes
$1,800.00

This antique Chinese nephrite jade carving of a naturalistic motif, possibly a squash or gourd.

It measures 2 inches long by 1 1/8 inches tall by about 1/2 inch in depth.

It dates to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)in China and is carved from a pale green celadon jade.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #82890 (stock #TR0116)
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$1,995.00

This ANTIQUE CHINESE EXPORT PEWTER FISH BOWL & COVER measures 8 1/2 inches by 7 inches by 4 inches.

It is in excellent condition with no evidence of restoration or repairs. It does have some tarnish and wear as would be expected on a soft pewter serving dish that is between 120-160 years old.

IT IS HALLMARKED ON BOTH THE BOTTOM OF THE BOWL AND UNDER THE LID.

IT STILL RETAINS IT'S ORIGINAL GLASS EYES.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Indian Subcontinent : Pre 1800 item #1206291
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$4,500.00

This fine bronze ewer or kettle (aftaba) dates to the 18th Century in Wughal India.

It is of typical form and good weight. It measures: height: 26cm, width: 24cm.

It has a prominent faceted spout along with its original lid with a bud-like finial, an 'S' shaped handle which has a stylized lion head at one end and a lotus bud finial at the other. It stands on four short feet.

The flattened, globular pear shaped body tapers to a long neck. The body has been cast with raised cloud or foliage borders to the top and bottom, The design work on the body is of better quality than usually seen. The body, lid and spout have been engraved overall with repeated stylized vegetable or poppy motifs. The lid has similar patterns.

Ewers of this type originated in Persia and the Middle East. Typical Islamic ewers comprised a central chamber to which a spout, foot, handle and neck were attached. They permitted water to flow - notations in the Koran described flowing water as 'clean'.

Ewers were introduced to India by Muslim invaders during the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. Later Indian inspired designs became more curvaceous and many were decorated  with lush plant and floral motifs.

In India, local Muslims used such vessels for hand washing. They became a practical tool of hospitality, being used to welcome visitors by pouring scented water over the hands and feet and into a basin, and took on a great variety of shapes and types whilst adhering to the basic ewer form.

This example is in excellent condition. There are no repairs, splits or dents. as mentioned, the lid is original – usually the lid is missing or replaced.

A slightly larger (39.4 cm tall) sold at Sotheby's on October 5, 2011 for 6250 British pounds( $9784.00 in US dollars) (lot 265) . It had much less surface detailing. ( http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2011/arts-of-the-islamic-world/lot.265.html )

Provenance: The southern California art market prior to 1980.

Reference: Zebrowski, M., Gold, Silver & Bronze from Mughal India, Alexandria Press, 1997.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pre 1900 item #834235
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This item is currently being auctioned

This large Chinese Cloisonne covered box measures 15 inches in diameter. It actually measures 17.5 inches wide, when you include the bronze handles on either side. It also measures 8 inches tall.

It is in excellent condition with the exception of a small circular restored spot on the bottom of the exterior. It appears to have been repaired in the late 19th century, based on the odd shade of green enamel that was used in the repair.

The cloisonne scene on the lid consists of a phoenix (fenghuang) looking down on a mountain range across the waters and under a red sun (a possible reference to Japan).

The chrysanthemums in the foreground may refer to Japanese royalty. This could have been designed as a gift for Japanese royalty.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #877532
Ancient -Eyes
$395.00

This Japanese Satsuma pitcher or condiment jar measures about 6 inches tall by 4 inches in diameter at it's widest point.

It dates from the late 19th century-early 20th Century( Meiji Period) (circa 1880-1915).

It is in excellent condition with some minor losses to the gilding on the handle.

It is covered overall with a finely detailed series of patterns, which include a bird and dragon motif with fans.

Based on it's rounded and smoothed edges, it appears that this small vessel never originally had a permanent top or stopper.

It is unmarked as to maker or country of origin . This one fact helps to date it pre 1895 when US import export laws were established. After that date it would have had to have been marked as to country of origin.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Sculpture : Pre 1492 item #570738
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Price on Request

This ancient marble carving of a reclining lion measures 6 1/2 inches wide by 5 inches in depth by 4 1/2 inches high.

It dates to either the Tang Dynasty in China (618 AD 907 AD) or slightly earlier in one of the Roman provinces ( possibly 300-400 AD). It is in excellent condition and quite rare.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Hardstones : Pre 1900 item #656890
Ancient -Eyes
$2,695.00

This standing nephrite jade carving of a bearded and robed figure with long horns or a headdress of some sort measures about 10 1/2 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 1 1/2 inches in depth.

It is carved from a large piece of nephrite ranging from pale to deep green with a strip of oxidized white to yellow jade down the middle. In addition, there is a crackled stripe of oxidation running down through the center of the face through the figure to the bottom of the robe.

There are also engraved rectangular patterns and additional patterns on the robe.

Although the serious possibility exists that this is an old nephrite carving dating to the Shang period, we are dating this one very conservatively to about circa 1900-1920. If it turns out to be much older, we are certain the buyer will not be too upset.

It is interesting to note, however, that the oxidation and subsequent crackling of the stone that runs right down through the face probably occurred after the jade was carved. The question arises: if this is a copy made in the last 100 years or so, why didn't they turn it around before they carved the face, as the center of the back side is pristine where the face could have been positioned, no crackling or deterioration? It would have been the better choice to use as the front and would have made a more attractive and potentially more saleable copy. If however, the deterioration of the stone actually happened over an extended period of time after it was carved, that would make more sense as an explanation as to why the current positioning of the stone in relation to it's natural flaws or irregularities.