ANCIENT- EYES
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1492 item #665687
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Price on Request

This large bronze figure of Avalokitesvara dates somewhere between the Song Dynasty and the Ming Dynasty in China.

This figure represents one third of a Buddhist Triad, which may have originally been created as an altarpiece in a Buddhist temple.

This bronze figure measures 21 inches tall by 9 inches wide by 8 inches in depth. He/she is depicted wearing a Tang Dynasty upraised hair style and ornate robes and jeweled detailing.

It is in excellent condition with remnants of old gilt and colors remaining in areas. The head is completely covered with a layer of gold and the remainder is covered with a deep brown patina overall.

Traditionally, Avalokitesvara would sit on the left side of Amitabha Buddha in a three figure triad with Mahasthamaprapta sitting on the right side. There are engraved Chinese characterson the reverse side of it's base which translate as left two.

There are additional marks on the Gui held in front of the figure which may represent the date or the original donor of the bronze.

Since the side figures of a triad were smaller than the central figure,the central Buddha must have been fairly large. This fits with the theory of an origin in a temple or possibly a very wealthy home.

In Chinese Buddhism the Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara is also known as Guanyin. Among the Chinese, Avalokitesvara is almost exclusively called Guanshiyin Pusa. Some Daoist scriptures give her the title of Guanyin Dashi, and sometimes informally as Guanyin Fozu.

In Chinese Buddhism, the worship of Guanyin as a goddess by the populace is generally not in conflict with the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara's nature. In fact the widespread worship of Guanyin as a "Goddess of Mercy and Compassion" is seen as the boundless salvific nature of bodhisattva Avalokitesvara at work. The Buddhist canon states that bodhisattvas can assume whatsoever gender and form is needed to liberate beings from ignorance

This museum quality gilt bronze figure was purchased from an old collection of Asian antiques originally formed during the early portion of the 20th century.

The authenticity of this bronze is guaranteed without exception.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1492 item #1166326
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Sold

These two original Chinese bronze figures date from the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) along with the gilt bronze screens behind them.

The bronze Buddha measures 7 3/4 inches tall by 5 3/4 inches wide by 3 3/4 inches in depth. (19.5 cm x 14.5 cm x 10.0 cm). The Buddha has a large percentage of it's original gilding remaining as do both of the gilt bronze backs. The Buddha also has a Wan symbol on his chest.

The bronze Guanyin or Avalokitesvara measures 8.25 inches tall by 5 inches wide by 3.5 inches in depth. (21 cm x 12.5 cm x 8.5 cm).

We are offering both of the bronzes and both of the finely detailed gilt bronze backs as a group (4 pieces -2 figures and 2 screen backs -all at one price.)

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A comparable seated bronze Buddha of the same size (8.25 inches) sold at auction recently at Christies London, South Kensington on May 18th 2012 for $81, 349.00

http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/lot/a-gilt-bronze-figure-of-a-seated-5564312-details.aspx?from=searchresults&intObjectID=5564312&sid=9fa10335-1106-4707-9a6c-05e1583ac92b

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All of these bronzes are original, of the period (Ming Dynasty) and guaranteed as such.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #82890 (stock #TR0116)
Ancient -Eyes
$1,995.00

This ANTIQUE CHINESE EXPORT PEWTER FISH BOWL & COVER measures 8 1/2 inches by 7 inches by 4 inches.

It is in excellent condition with no evidence of restoration or repairs. It does have some tarnish and wear as would be expected on a soft pewter serving dish that is between 120-160 years old.

IT IS HALLMARKED ON BOTH THE BOTTOM OF THE BOWL AND UNDER THE LID.

IT STILL RETAINS IT'S ORIGINAL GLASS EYES.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1700 item #630681
Ancient -Eyes
$5,600.00

This original bronze figure of a seated and robed official holding a jui (symbol of power) measures 8 1/2 inches tall by 5 inches wide by 3 1/2 inches.

It is covered overall with a very subtle and dark patina. It has a softness of detail that only comes from hundreds of years of handling. It also has a few cracks and slight losses to it's surface that do not detract from it's overall appearance.

It dates to a period ranging from the 15th through the 17th centuries in China.

The buyer will not be disappointed, as it is nicer than the photos would indicate. This bronze figure is guaranteed to be an original ( of the period. It is NOT a copy or reproduction of any kind.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1800 item #1107919
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This item is currently being auctioned

Pair of Imperial Bronze Dragon Seals: Qianlong Marks and Period

This large pair of dragon handled bronze seals date from the period of Qianlong (1735-1795), emperor of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) in China.

The rectangular base measures 8 ½ inches by 7 ¼ inches (21.5 cm x 19.5 cm). The dragon handle stands up about 3 inches tall (8 cm.).

The top portions of the seals are covered with chiseled and engraved patterns of dragons and swirling lines representing the ocean or the sky. Standing on top of all this is the dragon handle.

The bottom of the seals are covered in archaic old Chinese pictogram script (see closeup photos). They also include traditional Chinese characters in one corner which are easily interpreted as Qianlong Reign Marks.

Some folks thought these might be paperweights because of their rather large size, compared to most seals of either bronze or jade. A recent article in the Jakarta Post referred to a very similar bronze seal as a “casted paperweight from the Qianlong Period”. See link below:

( http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2011/04/04/scholar-objects-undervalued-small-treasures.html )

These bronzes may have served double duty, with an original purpose yet to be determined by deciphering the archaic script and the possibility of also having been used as massive scroll weights.

The Emperor Qianlong had a serious interest in painting and was known to dabble in it himself on occasion. Some scrolls are exceptionally long and might have required a substantial scroll weight to keep them open for viewing (or possible two or more to hold the whole long thing open in the privacy of one's palace).

On April 4, 2010 , one identical bronze seal/scroll weight was sold at auction in China for the amount of RMB 651,200. (about $108,000.00 US ). The auction estimate had originally been 600,000-800,000 RMB (about $100,000-$130,000) for one single bronze seal.

The pair of bronze seals or scroll weights or “paperweights” are both in excellent condition. The buyer will not be disappointed.

They were purchased about 30 years ago in Southern California.

NOTE: Although the photos below make the the bronzes appear to be of different sizes , only the photos are of different sizes, not the bronzes themselves.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: THERE ARE A FEW VERY TINY SPOTS OF VERDIGRIS ON ONE OF THE SEALS . THIS IS NOT UNUSUAL FOR A BRONZE ITEM THAT IS OVER 200 YEARS OLD. IT IS REALLY NOT WORTH MENTIONING BUT WE ALWAYS LIKE TO HAVE FULL DISCLOSURE SO THERE ARE NO SURPRISES FOR THE BUYER.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Metalwork : Pre 1837 VR item #95378 (stock #TR0154)
Ancient -Eyes
$695.00

This pair of charming 18th-19th century copper censors are in the form of small archaic wine jars. They have some verdigris on them but they are in excellent condition.

They measure 5 1/4 inches tall by about 4 1/2 inches wide.

The tripod feet are comprised of foo dogs or temple lions with elongated tongues. They have been used as candle holders at some time and retain a small amount of wax on the interior.

There are no marks on these censors. Circa 1780-1840's.