ANCIENT- EYES
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Earthenware : Pre 1900 item #261238 (stock #TR0306)
Ancient -Eyes
$1,200.00

This hand painted ceramic vase measures about 10 inches (24.5 cm)tall by 5 inches (13 cm) in diameter at it's widest point.

It dates circa 1870-1900 (during the late Meiji Period) in Japan.

It is in excellent condition with virtually all of the high relief gilding intact.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Earthenware : Pre 1900 item #92349 (stock #TR0149)
Ancient -Eyes
$895.00

This forest green glazed Kochi ware vase with handles measures 12 cm tall by 12 cm in diameter by 19 cm wide (handle to handle). It most likely dates to the beginning of the 20th century. The glaze pools dark green in the crevices.

There are NO marks or signatures on this vase.

It is in excellent condition. No chips, cracks, hairlines, repairs, etc. It does have a few very light surface scratches to the glaze. There are four round felt pads on the bottom of the vase (see enlargement photos).

The glaze is even and complete. Any white spots or lines are from the flash and are NOT on the vase itself.

Japanese Awaji ware was influenced by or copied after, Chinese Cochin ware: a 16th century pottery originally produced in Southern China or Vietnam. It consisted primarily of green glazed wares with low relief decoration* (*Ceramic Art of Japan, Seattle Art Museum, Page 164)(CAJ).

Another theory about the origin of Cochi or Cochin ware is that it was carried from China to South East Asia (modern Day Vietnam and Thailand) during the Song or Yuan Dynasty . In 1206 the Mongolian tribes met and agreed to unite under Genghis Khan. In 1215 Genghis Khan captured Beijing. In 1279 Kublai Khan, his grandson, completed the Quest of China, ending the Song Dynasty. The Yuan dynasty that they created lasted from 1279 to 1368 (1368- 1644 A.D. Ming dynasty). Faced with Mongol rule artists, potters, merchants and exporters left China and set up their operations in Vietnam and Thailand. The Sung kiln and glaze technologies were transferred to Vietnam. Bat Trang (in Vietnam) prospered and continued to do so as the Ming dynasty maintained a closed-door policy until 1567. It was not until 1684 that the Chinese competed effectively with Vietnamese ceramics exporters. By this time Vietnamese pottery had achieved such popularity in Japan that even the Japanese potters produced ceramics in the Vietnamese style, which they called Cochi or Kochi ware. During the late Edo Period there was a fashion among Kyoto potters (including Eiraku Hozen, Ogata Kenzan, and Aoki Mokubei) to emulate the Chinese wares of the 16th century, especially the export blue and white, gosu-akae, and Kochi ware** (**CAJ-pg 158).