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ATTIC RED-FIGURE CALYX KRATER BY THE NIOBID PAINTER

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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Ancient World: Greek: Pottery: Pre AD 1000: Item # 1155840

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ATTIC RED-FIGURE CALYX KRATER BY THE NIOBID PAINTER
Culture: Attic/ Greek. Date: 450 - 440 B.C. Medium: Pottery. Condition: Complete, one handle repaired. Provenance: Ex: French collection. Measurements: 10 in. High (25.5 cm.). Depicting a departure scene. An armed warrior holding a round shield decorated with a leather shield apron, extends a phiale toward a female holding an oinochoe; an Iconic column between them. At right is a draped male holding a staff. Reverse: A draped female holding a phiale to a young man leaning upon a staff. Published: Art of the Ancient World, 2010, no.148; 1000 years of Ancient Greek Vases II, 2010, no.103. The Niobid painter was one of the most well known ancient Athenian potters in the Red-Figure style, he was named after a krater which on one side shows the god Apollo and his sister Artemis killing the children of Niobe who were collectively called the Niobids. This painter was influenced by Polygnotos of Thasos, a painter well known for painting monumental vases. He also used certain artistic elements he saw in frescoes painted by Micon of Athens. One of his vases is housed in the Louvre Museum in Paris, another in the J.Paul Getty Museum. This painter was one of the earlieast who attempted to create a three dimensional space, by outlining the foreground, middleground and background. A calyx krater is a type of vessel used to dilute and mix wine. It was invented around 525 B.C. by Exekias. It's form remembers the calux of flowers with low handles protruding from the base of the foot. A krater is used to be placed in the center of the room where the wine-water mixture would be withdrawn from the krater with other smaller vessels. The ancient Greeks used to dilute wine in different ratios: 1 to 3 (wine to water), was optimal for long conversations, 1 to 2 ratio was used when fun to be had, 1 to 1 ratio was only used for orgiastic revelry.


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