Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This intact and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #944741
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,165.00
The beautiful pieces offered here is a matching set of Greek silver earrings, that date circa 6th century B.C. These pieces are made of solid silver, are not plated or have a bronze core, and they have an attractive dark gray patina. These pieces are approximately 1 inch high and .64 inches wide near the base. The upper half narrows into a point, which allowed these earrings to pass through a pierced ear. There is some flex to these pieces even now, and they could easily be worn today. The shape of this type of earring is known as a "boat-shaped type", and they have two additional decorative rosette pattern knobs that are seen on each side. Each of these minute round knobs were individually added, and these earrings were made with a great deal of skill, although they have a simple design. Greek silver jewelry from this time frame, circa 550 B.C., is scarce, as most Greek silver jewelry dates to the later Hellenistic Period, circa 336 B.C. (A Greek silver fibula with analogous workmanship is seen in The Belgrade National Museum and is published in "Balkani" by Tatjana Cvjeticanin, Giovanni Gentili, and Vera Krstic, Silvana Editoriale Pub., 2008, no. 73.) The earrings offered here are intact and have no repair/restoration, and are in exceptional mint condition. An earring stand is included, along with a gift box. Ex: Private German collection. (These pieces have additional documentation for the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Wood : Pre AD 1000 item #969122
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This piece is an exceptional Egyptian wooden female figurine that was likely part of an offering model, and this piece dates circa 12th Dynasty, 1991-1786 B.C. This large piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and on its custom stand, it is approximately 15.75 inches high. This piece is also larger than most examples of this type, as complete examples average about 9 to 10 inches high. This esoteric piece is missing the arms, which were attached to the main body with wooden pins, and the feet, which attached this piece to the model platform. This is often the case with model figurines of this type, as one complete figurine was made of several pieces. This piece was originally coated with a white gesso, and was then painted with several pigments; and in this case, there are sections of white gesso with red, black, and blue pigments. The exposed wood is a nice tan honey color, and the overall piece is very light in weight. One of the arms probably balanced the basket that is seen on her head, and the other arm likely hung down at her side. These arms were attached to the main body with round wooden dowels, and the deteriorated remains of these rounded wooden dowles can be seen within the rounded holes where they were inserted into the shoulders of the torso. The carving of this piece is exquisite, and is very erotic, as there are graceful contours of the female form, and the torso has an elongated sensual design. The sensual design of this piece conveys an easy body movement, as the left leg is seen slightly striding in front of the other which indicates an easy stride, and this is another design feature that this piece has that one can easily perceive. One of the shoulders is also slightly larger than the other, as one arm was raised to support the basket, and the other arm hung down at the side. This piece was likely part of an offering model that was placed in the tomb of its owner, and these models provided sustenance for the deceased. There is also a notch at the bottom of the back right leg, and this fitted to a peg that attached this piece to the base of the model. An analogous female figurine from the same period, with a basket on the head that is part of a procession scene, can be seen in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in the exhibit "The Secrets of Tomb 10A: Egypt 2000 B.C.", which runs until May 16, 2010. A photo of this analogous female figurine can also be seen in the Jan./Feb. issue of Archaeology Magazine, p.14. Additional female model figurines can be seen in "Models of Daily Life in Ancient Egypt, From the Tomb of Meket-Re at Thebes" by H.E. Winlock, London, 1955. An analogous example of nearly the same size, with no arms, and with the left leg striding forward can be seen in Christies Antiquities, Dec. 2003, no. 33. ($16,730.00 realized, and see attached photo.) A complete figurine can be seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1995, no. 14. (This exceptional piece is approximately 12.8 inches high, and dates to the early 12th Dynasty. The female form and artistic style of the torso is very analogous to the piece offered here. $40,000-$60,000.00 estimates, $57,500.00 realized.) This piece is also a type with the left leg advanced as seen in "Egyptian Servant Statues" by J.H. Breasted, Washington D.C., 1948, Pl. 56b. The exceptional piece offered here has also been examined by Selim Dere of Fortuna Fine Arts in New York, Alan Safani of Safani Galleries in New York, and Dr. Robert Bianchi. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Pierre Berge & Asso. Paris, Archeologie, June 2011, no. 101. Euro 5,000.00-7,000.00 estimates. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323161
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an early Greek Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 500-490 B.C., and is classified in "Group L" by Seltman. This coin is approximately 25mm wide, weighs 16.61 gms, and is in mint state condition (FDC/FDC). This coin has a very light gray patina with some minute spotty dark black deposits, and has a beautiful natural "as found" patina. This exceptional coin has the helmeted head of Athena facing right seen on the obverse, and the reverse has a facing standing owl, with an olive sprig behind, and the Greek lettering (A-TH-E) before. The standing owl was also the "civic badge" of Athens, and was widely recognized in the ancient Greek world. This coin also has perfect centering, in addition to, extremely high relief which are factors that make this coin one of the top examples that have been seen on the market. This coin was also likely minted shortly before the battle of Marathon, circa 490 B.C., and was likely used to help expand the Athenian forces that opposed the invading Persian military juggernaut. The helmeted Athena is also a masterpiece of Greek Archaic art, with the slightly smiling face of Athena and the large almond-shaped eyes which are hallmarks of the Archaic Period. The bust of Athena also has a sculptural quality and design that is not often seen on prior or subsequent Athenian issues. This piece also displays a full crest and neckline that is not often seen as well, as this piece has perfect centering and was minted on a large and full flan. Overall, this coin is one of the finest specimens known for the type due to the reasons noted above, along with the fact that this piece has exceptional artistic style which also contributes to this coin's beauty and eye appeal. References: Svoronos, Pl. 6, No. 11. and Seltman, Pl. XV, A214/P275. Ex: Private German collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This coin is a mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), Thasos silver tetradrachm, circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club and cloaked in the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "Herakles"; and below reads "Thasos", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74. SNG Copenhagen 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1276507
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This rare piece is a Greek Attic "black-figure" alabastron that dates circa early 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6 inches high, by 2.3 inches in diameter at the upper rim. This piece has four black bands, with light tan reserve sections seen between, that run horizontally around the piece from top to bottom. This piece is also designed with a wide, flat disk at the top which is a design feature that helped control the flow of liquids from the piece. This piece likely held a precious olive oil, or a perfume-type unguent with an oil base. This piece also has a black "line design pattern" that is seen on the upper third of the main body of the vessel, and this "line design pattern" also runs around the piece. This pattern is often referred to as a "net pattern" which usually is seen with straight lines, but the pattern seen here is seen with overlapping "u-shaped" sections that resemble overlapping scale armor, and there is a strong possibility that this is likely what this pattern is meant to represent. This piece was created at about the time of Athen's victory over the Persians at Marathon circa 490 B.C., and shortly after the stunning Athenian victory, Pheidias designed a massive bronze statue on the Parthenon referred to as the "Athena Promachos", meaning "Athena who fights in the front line". According to Pausanias, this warrior Athena was complete with a helmet, spear, and a scale armor cuirass which also displayed a facing head of Medusa. This image of the warrior Athena wearing a scale armor cuirass is also often displayed on Athenian "black figure" and "red figure" ceramics during the first quarter of the 5th century B.C. The "line design pattern" seen on the piece offered here likely refers to Athena Promachos, and her scale armor cuirass, and the Greek Attic painter who produced this piece, simply transferred this pattern onto this example. In addition, this piece likely held olive oil which was sacred to the goddess Athena, and there was a sacred grove of olive trees which was located near the base of the Parthenon. If in fact the design on this rare vessel is intended to represent scale armor, was the design of this piece conceived to protect a sacred olive oil? This is a question that really cannot be answered, but what is certain is that this alabastron vessel, with this "scale armor line design pattern", is also not seen on other Attic alabastron examples that are classified in the Beazley Archive, Oxford; however, this pattern is seen on other Attic vessels for the period that show Athena wearing a scale armor cuirass. The piece offered here is intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and has some minute surface pitting and scraps. Overall, this elegant piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is a very nice example with a rare painted design. This piece also comes with a custom metal stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: W. Levy collection, U.K., circa 1916-2006. Ex: Bonham's Antiquities, London, April 2007, no. 324. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1328142
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This esoteric piece is a fragment of a Greek Cycladic idol of the "Kiliya" female type, and dates to the Early Bronze Age, circa 2700-2400 B.C. This nice piece is approximately 3.1 inches high, by 2.6 inches wide, by .67 inches thick. This torso fragment is about one third of the complete piece that it once was, and the breaks are seen at the neck/upper shoulder and below the waist of the figurine. This piece also matches the scale and type of a complete example that was sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2004, no. 223. ($764,000.00 realized.) The piece noted above and the example offered here, both display three lines in the form of a triangle that defines the waist and the female abdomen. This highly stylized type of piece is a fusion of geometric forms, with relatively massive heads carved in the round atop a long and slender neck, and broad shoulders that slope in graceful curves that end abruptly at the elbows. The arms are also defined by oblique cuts, and extend well into the main body of the torso. There are approximately 32 recorded complete examples of this rare Cycladic marble type, and they range from about 6 to 7 inches high. The torso fragment offered here, if complete, would fall within the range of a complete example as noted above. The "Kiliya" name comes from a site near Gallipoli, where a figure of this type was reputedly found, and this piece is now in the American School of Classical Studies in Athens. This type is also known as a "Stargazer" type, as the heads turned upwards and appear to face up to the sky. This piece also has some heavy calcite deposits seen on the backside, and some lighter deposits seen on the front side which is also an indication of a burial pattern. A fragment such as the piece offered here is extremely rare on the market today, and it is an exceptional example for the type. (A fragment of this type, size, and proportion was offered in New York in NFA Classical Auctions, Inc., Dec. 1991, no. 62, $6,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates.) For additional related examples see J. Thimme, "Art and Culture of the Cyclades in the Third Millenium B.C.", Chicago, 1977, no. 560-566; and "Kunst der Kykladen, Karlsruhe Museum Exhibit 1976", no. 560 and 565. (See attached photo.). Ex: Bomford collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1299213
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This scarce Greek Attic "Black-Figure" kylix dates circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is approximately 9.75 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.7 inches high. This piece is in superb condition, and is intact with no noticeable repair/restoration. This piece is a "Type B" form, and has a wide and shallow draft for the inner bowl, two attached rounded and looping handles, and a slightly raised disk seen above the thick base disk. (For the "Type B" form, and the authoritative work on Attic Black-Figure painters, see J.D. Beazley, "Attic Black-Figure Vase Painters", Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1956.) There is also a solid black inner glaze, along with a dotted tondo seen within a tan reserve. The outer surface of this fine cup has two attractive large black palmettes, seen on each side, which alternate between three black floral patterns. There is also a solid lustrous black glaze seen below the palmettes, and this continues to the top of the base disk. Another analogous example of identical size and design was offered in Bonhams Antiquities, London, Oct. 1996, no. 14. (250-280 Pound estimates, 450 Pounds realized, approximately $910.00 US. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1277641
Apolonia Ancient Art
$18,500.00
This sensual and appealing piece is a Greek Attic column krater that dates circa 460 B.C. This Attic "red-figure" piece is approximately 10.8 inches high, by 9.9 inches wide at the top from handle to handle. This piece has also been attributed to the "Florence Painter", who was one of the better Greek Attic painters who used gestures and facial expression to portray emotion. This piece shows three standing young men on "Side A", and two facing and standing young men on "Side B". The three young men on "Side A" are all seen interacting with one another, and the figure on the left appears to reach out and help balance the amphora that the central figure is carrying to the right. The figure on the right appears to walk towards the central figure, and is watching his progress. The entire scene conveys movement, and is an every day scene that perhaps would be lived out in "Classical Period" Athens. The central figure seen carrying the amphora, perhaps used for water or wine, is seen with his upper torso designed with a three-quarter design that is opened to the viewer. His cloak is also seen open at the center, which conveys an erotic and sensual view of his nude body which the figure on the right is closely admiring as well. All of the other figures seen on this piece are fully cloaked, and the semi-nude central figure on "Side A" truly stands out in the composition. In addition, his hair is seen "free flowing" down from his red wreathed brow, and this hair design adds to the sensual nature of this piece. "Side B" also shows a scene where one young man is offering another a drink, and perhaps both scenes on this vessel portray and refer to a public celebration. The young man receiving the drink also appears to be surprised for the drink offering. The eye design seen on the five figures of this lovely piece are also very analogous to the contemporary "Niobid Painter", as are the faces that have rounded chins and eternally young faces. (See "Attic Red-Figure Pottery" by Robert Folsom, Noyes Classical Studies, 1976, p. 175, Fig. A30, for a drawing of an eye design attributed to the Niobid Painter.) This piece also has a delicately painted "ivy leaf and floral pattern" design painted within a box that is seen on the raised neck of "Side A". There is also an added detailed "black acorn pattern" seen running around the top lip, with an attractive black "acanthus pattern" seen above each handle as well. This piece is in mint to superb condition, with no repair/restoration, and has vibrant orange/red, black, and red colors. There are heavy white calcite deposits seen mostly on the inside of the vessel, and on the outer upper third of the vessel, and overall, this intact piece is in it's natural "as found" condition. An exceptional erotic type vessel that not only has a great deal of eye appeal, but was also created by a scarce painter that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1310114
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These pieces are a matching pair of Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" oinochoe, and date circa 340-330 B.C. These pieces are approximately 9 inches high, and are attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop. These attractive pieces are also attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter, who is thought to have worked in the "Darius-Underworld" workshop that produced several of the best painters for the period. These various painters also had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. These superb to mint quality pieces have no apparent repair/restoration and are intact, and in addition, have very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The front side of both of these attractive vessels have a bust of a beautiful young woman facing left, who is seen wearing a hair sakkos, large painted white earrings, and a white dotted necklace. The faces of the young woman portrayed on these two superb vessels are very sweet and youthful images, and are better examples than most images that are usually seen on Greek Apulian vessels of this type. These pieces also display a white comb above the forehead which is a hallmark attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter. The young woman seen on these pieces is known as the "Lady of Fashion", and likely represents Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. These pieces also have extensive acanthus floral patterns seen behind and on each side of the vessel, and have a raised footed ring base. These pieces both have some spotty black mineral deposits, and some attractive minute root marking. These pieces are also analogous to another matching pair seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1985, no. 274. ($1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1307575
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This exceptional Greek ceramic is a Messapian trozella that dates circa 400-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has two applied strap handles to a pear-shaped body that has a raised foot. The handles also have four disks built into the handle junctions, and the description "trozella" has the meaning "little wheels", and "trozella" is a very appropriate description for vessels of this type. The esoteric piece offered here is an early example, as it has a shorter pear-shaped body with a footed base, rather than an extended body with a raised foot with a spread base. The earlier examples are much rarer, and often have beautiful detailed painting as the example has here. Vessels of this type also generally have painted sections that are worn, and in many cases the painted images are completely worn off, but the images seen on this exquisite vessel are nearly entirely intact, and can clearly be seen on both sides of the vessel. These vessels were also painted after the vessel was fired in the kiln, and were quickly re-fired again, and this is why the painted images seen on vessels of this type are generally faded and are not very bright. The painting seen on this exceptional piece is extremely fine and detailed, and shows reddish-brown acanthus patterns on the upper shoulder that are connected with a single fine line with added dots. There are added geometric "cross-and-line" patterns seen on various sections of the vessel, and the two boxes seen on the upper shoulder have dark red defining lines. The overall esoteric design of this vessel, along with the delicate painting, make this vessel one of the finest examples of this type that has been on the market. The description "Messapian" also refers to the Greek colonists and native Greek peoples that settled in the southern heel of Italy. It is unkown if this early example was produced locally, or was a production in a Greek city made for import into the region. Given the delicate Greek acanthus designs, and the fact that this piece is a rarer earlier example, I am leaning to the latter scenario that this piece may have been produced for import into the region. This piece also has some minute dark spotty black mineral deposits, along with some heavier root marking seen on the inside of the vessel and the upper flat rim. Another analogous vessel that is a later type, was offered by Sotheby's Antiquities, Dec. 2007, no. 129. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $4,688.00 realized.) The vessel offered here is rare on the market, as it is an early example, has delicately painted fine design work, and is in mint condition. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: New York private collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek footed red ware olpe, approximately 3.5 inches high, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #613883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This Greek terracotta is in the form of a molded weight. This tan terracotta piece dates circa 4th century B.C. and is a rare type of terracotta, as there are very few known weights that are fashioned from terracotta. The advantage of forming a weight from terracotta is that one can mold an exact size, thus producing a piece with an exact weight. This piece has ten round stamped seals that bear the form of a hippocamp, with two on side A, two on side B, three on side C, two on side D, and one on the bottom. These ten seals seen on this piece may indicate a unit of weight and this weight was used to keep the warp threads perpendicular on verticle looms. These weights were suspended from the threads with the help of rings, that were probably made of metal, and these were attached to the holes in the weight. The round hole seen near the top allowed this piece to suspend and swivel on the metal rings. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high by 2 inches wide at the center. The shape of the body tapers at the top, which allowed this piece to freely pivot and move on its attached ring swivel. There are sections of calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and much of the original outer surface remains. If you collect ancient textiles, this would be an interesting addition to your collection. For another weight of this type see Lila Marangou, "Ancient Greek Art, N.P. Goulandris Collection", Athens, Greece, 1996, no. 216. Ex: Private German collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1100413
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive little piece is a Roman glass flask that dates circa mid 1st century A.D. This piece is an early Roman glass vessel that was produced during the early Roman Imperial period. This mint quality vessel is approximately 2.4 inches high, and is in flawless condition. This piece is a deep blue color, and is from a class of Roman glass vessels known as a "cobalt-blue" type. This deep blue color was produced by adding cobalt into the glass, and this color was extremely popular with the Roman elite during the early Imperial period. This scarce vessel has some nice multi-iridescence and some spotty minute root marking, along with some white calcite deposits that are seen mostly on the rounded bottom base of the vessel. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal and is a scarce type with excellent color. For the type see, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John W. Hayes, Toronto, 1975, no. 98, p. 51. This piece also comes with a black plexiglas stand. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1199056
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic oinochoe that dates circa early 5th century B.C. This charming little piece is approximately 5.5 inches high. This piece is an Attic blackware ceramic that has an incised designed theater mask in the form of a light red bearded man with a white diadem. This extremely rare example was also produced in the "Six's Technique", as seen with the red beard of the theatre mask with incised hair detail, and the face and diadem with white painted details. According to Joseph Noble in "The Techniques of Painted Attic Pottery", Watson-Guptill Pub., New York, 1965, p. 66: "SIX'S TECHNIQUE: Six's technique of East Greek origin, was usually employed on small vases such as lekythoi, phialai, skyphoi, and Nicosthenic amphorae. It made use of the added white, pink, and red. In this technique the picture was painted with a brush, applying the color to the surface of the vase which had been coated with the black glaze matter, and sometimes details or other figures were added by incision. The vase was then subjected to the usual Attic three-stage firing. This was an interesting technique; the pottery is attractive and has a spontaneous quality, but it is somewhat crude, lacking the refinement of the conventional black-figure or red-figure work." This Attic piece is extremely rare to rare with this type of "Six's technique" design, and in addition, incised theater masks of this type seen on Attic ceramics is not often seen on the market. This piece is also classified as "Type 5B", according to the "John D. Beazley Shape Chart", and is an extremely rare type which is only seen circa early 5th century B.C. This complete piece is repaired from several fragments, and has only over paint where the pieces have come together, and overall, is an extremely fine example with a nice deep black glaze. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1224341
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,665.00
This lustrous piece is a Greek black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa early 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This scarce to rare piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and is superb to mint quality. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. This appealing piece has a lustrous deep black glaze that has a multi-colored iridescent patina. The underside has no glaze, and there are some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and some heavy white calcite deposits seen on the inside surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also an imitation of the analogous shaped bronze and silver vessels of the period, and a silver vessel with an analogous shape to the piece offered here was found in Tomb III of the royal tombs at Vergina, Greece. This silver vessel is also illustrated in "The Search for Alexander: An Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1980, no. 158, p. 181. (See attached photo.) This type of vessel was created in precious metals, including gilded bronze, for royalty and high nobility, and painted pottery for daily use. Although apparently created for daily use, this piece is scarce to rare, but there is also the possibility that this piece could have been created solely as a votive piece, which represented a more valuable vessel made from precious metals. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece, such as the vessel offered here, was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. See attached photo.) On the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and Names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#091613-04. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This attractive piece is a silver bowl that is Greco-Thracian, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This large piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece is intact, and is a complete example that has a nice dark gray patina with some spotty dark black deposits. In addition, there is some minute root marking and an attractive multi-colored iridescence that can be seen on various sections of the piece. This piece has a hand beaten "floral pattern" seen on the outer side, and the negative image of this design can also be seen on the inside inner surface. The "floral pattern" has a circular roundel center, and the tips of the individual pedals have semi-circular curves that were each hand stamped with a punch. This piece also has a rolled edge that folds towards the inside, and was heat sealed. There is also an attached single silver "ring handle" that is seen on one side near the top rim of the vessel. This single silver "ring handle" has a round attachment plate that has a decorative stamped semi-circular pattern as well. The silver ring itself is very durable, and is very thick which is a strong indicator that this piece was meant to have been hung, and may have been hung and used in a private home, on a wagon, or a horse. The ancient Thracians and Scythians valued vessels made from precious metals, and were also a mobile culture. This piece may have been produced in one of the Greek Thracian coastal cities, and was sold or traded to the interior, but the artistic style of this piece points to the region that runs around the eastern and northern coasts of the Black Sea. ( A silver bottle with an analogous floral pedal design and construction technique is seen in "Scythian Art" by Georges Charriere, Alpine Fine Arts Pub., 1979, no. 349. This silver bottle is attributed to the 4th century B.C., and is from modern day southern Ukraine. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare example, and large silver vessels of this type are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Michael Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1339434
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This detailed little gem of a piece is a Greek silver infant fibula pin that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C., and is approximately 1.2 inches high, by .75 inches wide. This piece is extremely rare to rare, as it was made for an infant, and it has extremely fine details and workmanship. Ancient Greek silver fibula pins of this type, are seldom seen on the market, and there is the possibility that this type of fibula was more votive in nature. This piece is intact, save for the missing pin, and it is "bow-shaped" with three raised "barrel-type" sections seen within the length of the piece. At the terminal end where the rotating pin was attached, there is a dainty, but detailed acanthus design seen on the front side. The back side of this terminal end is flat, and one can easily discern that this side is the back side of the piece. This piece has a lovely light gray patina, with some spotty dark gray mineral deposits. An analogous example can be seen in the Metropolitan Museum of New York, accession number: 52.36. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: