Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1031929
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek pyxis vessel that dates circa 3rd-2nd century B.C., and is a classic ancient Greek Hellenistic form. This piece is approximately 6.2 inches high by 4.25 inches in diameter, and is made of two sections, with a top section that sits on top of the bottom half. The walls of this intact ceramic are very thin, as the piece was fired at a high temperature. Consequently, this ceramic is very durable and the thin walls are very strong, and this suits this piece very well as it was designed to hold precious cosmetics and/or items such as jewelry. This piece was likely used by a woman of some means as it was an expensive piece in antiquity, and it may have also been used as a votive grave offering in order to be used in the afterlife as well. This piece is analogous to many "Attic" type examples, and is known as a "West Slope" type, as this type of ceramic was found on the west side of the Parthenon in Athens. This type of pyxis can also be seen in several Greek museums, including the Pella Museum in Greece. The piece offered here has a very attractive yellow ivy leaf and white berry band, which is a hallmark design of the Athenian ceramic industry, and many of these pieces were made for export. There are also two white decorative circles that run around the main body of the vessel, and a mold pressed roundel medallion that is seen at the top center of the upper lid section. Within this mold pressed medallion, are two standing figures of two lovers embracing, and a standing figure of Eros looking on. (A similar scene is seen on a Canosan terracotta pyxis, circa 3rd century B.C., which is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1987, no.276. See attached photo.) This intact piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and is in mint "as found" condition. This vessel also has very vibrant colors, has great eye appeal, and is a scarce to rare example. Ex: Ulla Lindner collection. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1351664
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Roman bronze weapon handle that is in the form of a panther head, and dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 3.5 inches long, by 1.5 inches wide at it's widest point, which is the width of the realistically designed panther head. This piece served as a weapon handle for a Roman dagger or a short sword, and may have served in a gladiatorial capacity, as the panther is a common symbol associated with gladiatorial armor. Another analogous gladiatorial handle, seen with gladiatorial daggers and short swords, is the eagle head type. Both of these types, the panther and eagle head handles, are rare to extremely rare on the market, and there are few recorded examples. The iron remains of the blade can still be seen within the hollow section of the piece, and there are also two bronze pins that held the blade into place. These bronze pins that run through this handle, were also hammered on each side of the piece, and this hammering securely riveted these pins into place. The head of the panther is not only very animated, but it is also a very powerful image. This very animated panther head is also very detailed, as there are silver inlaid eyes and fine details seen in the fanged growling mouth. The fanged mouth of the panther head is also seen biting down on a fragmented attachment ring. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty red highlights, and is an exceptional example for the type. This powerful piece is also mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1265926
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This scarce to rare coin is a Greek gold Quarter Stater attributed to Philip II, circa 323-315 B.C. This coin is approximately 12mm wide, weighs 1.91 gms, and is in superb condition which is (EF+/EF). This attractive coin shows a well defined Herakles head facing right, seen in high relief within a dotted border. The Herakles head is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress which has well defined detail, and is also well centered on the flan. The reverse shows a "au-dessus de l'arc" symbol above, a stringed bow, Greek lettering in the name of "Philip", a Herakles club, and a trident symbol which are all grouped on the reverse. The lettering and the symbols are also slightly double truck in sections, and the flan is slightly cupped. There are some minute minor excavation marks and root marking seen mainly on the reverse, and this coin is in much better condition than most examples of this coin, as the majority of specimens are in very fine (VF) condition and have a shallow relief die on the obverse. This piece also has a nice patina, with some spotty mint luster. This coin matches die set D-84/R-59, no. 129, which is seen in "Le Monnayage D'Argent Et D'Or De Philippe II" by Georges Le Rider, Paris, 1977. La Rider also classifies this coin as being in his "Group III", minted in the Pella Mint, and having a reverse type that shows the "au-dessus de l'arc" and trident symbols together in combination. There are fewer examples of this coin type seen in "Group III", as compared to the numerous examples and die combinations seen in "Group II". This coin is still a scarce coin type even for "Group II", and is rarer for "Group III". The reason for this is that the prior group was minted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great, who continued to mint this type after the death of his father, Philip II, circa 336 B.C. The coin offered here began to be minted for a short time after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C., and this is why this type is a scarce to rare issue. The minting techniques of this attractive coin also changed, with the flans of "Group II" being more concave, and are generally seen with a circular line that runs around the perimeter of the flan and frames the symbols and lettering seen on the reverse. The coin offered here does not have the circular line on the reverse as noted above, and has no dotted border seen on the reverse as well. This fractional denomination is also much more rarer than the larger gold staters from the same period, as this fractional coin type was only minted when a large amount of metal was available, which allowed for the minting of additional denominations such as this quarter stater. An exceptional coin that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357051
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems and large hoops are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately 1.25 inches high, by .25 inches in diameter for the shield emblems. Together the pair weighs 1.5 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems each have a raised central dot, and have a detailed beaded border. The hoops are very simple, and are a single strand that was attached to each of the shield emblems. These pieces are very durable, and can easily be worn today, as there is no clasp. This pair has some minute light red mineralization, and can be easily cleaned if one desires. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry with a simple design, which also displays well with the wearer. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : European Medieval : Pre AD 1000 item #1339132
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice piece is a Viking bronze pendant that dates circa 9th-10th century A.D. This piece is approximately 1.7 inches high, and the round plaque section is approximately 1.2 inches in diameter. This piece was made from two sections, one being the flat round plaque, and the other, is the strap loop that has a single rivet securing it to the main body of the piece. The round plaque has a hammered dotted border, and a hammered Christian Byzantine type cross design that has a round center. This round center may also double as a solar symbol, and the cross design also has an additional smaller cross patterns seen at the end of all four points. The design of this Christian cross, seen on this pendant, may also be one of the earliest Christian cross examples seen on a Viking culture type piece. The cross design also has remains of a light green to cream colored enamel, and this shows well against the dark green patina that this piece has. This piece is an exceptional example for the type, and is not often seen on the market in this superb condition. This piece is solid, and can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Denmark collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1310114
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These pieces are a matching pair of Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" oinochoe, and date circa 340-330 B.C. These pieces are approximately 9 inches high, and are attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop. These attractive pieces are also attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter, who is thought to have worked in the "Darius-Underworld" workshop that produced several of the best painters for the period. These various painters also had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. These superb to mint quality pieces have no apparent repair/restoration and are intact, and in addition, have very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The front side of both of these attractive vessels have a bust of a beautiful young woman facing left, who is seen wearing a hair sakkos, large painted white earrings, and a white dotted necklace. The faces of the young woman portrayed on these two superb vessels are very sweet and youthful images, and are better examples than most images that are usually seen on Greek Apulian vessels of this type. These pieces also display a white comb above the forehead which is a hallmark attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter. The young woman seen on these pieces is known as the "Lady of Fashion", and likely represents Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. These pieces also have extensive acanthus floral patterns seen behind and on each side of the vessel, and have a raised footed ring base. These pieces both have some spotty black mineral deposits, and some attractive minute root marking. These pieces are also analogous to another matching pair seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1985, no. 274. ($1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1276518
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This piece is a scarce Greek Mycenaean bronze double-ax head that dates circa 1400-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches long, by 2.25 inches high near the end of each blade. This piece is very solid, as it was cast as one piece, and because of it's heavy weight, it was well served as a heavy battle ax. This piece also had added strength, as the inner shank design is "V" shaped, and is not a round circle as most examples of this type have. This "V" designed inner shank provided for added strength relative to it's attachment to the shaft, and this design made this a powerful weapon, as this design gave added leverage to the warrior while striking a blow. This design also points to the fact that this piece was likely made for battle, rather than being made purely as a votive object after the death of the warrior. However, there is a strong possibility that this piece not only may have served in battle, but it was also used as a votive offering as well. This weapon was the principle weapon of the Mycenaean Greeks and was probably used during the Trojan War. This type of bronze weapon is also scarce to rare, because bronze during this period was very valuable, and bronze objects that were damaged and/or had lost their utility were often melted down into another bronze weapon or object. The shape of this heavy battle ax may have originated in Crete with the Minoan culture, circa 2000 B.C., as double-ax head weapons and plaques have been excavated at Knossos. This shape may also refer to the Minoan bull-jumping cult, as the ends of the double-ax may have represented the horns of the bull. A number of votive gold double-axes, found in Arkalochori in Crete, are of the same shape as the example offered here. This piece has a beautiful dark green/blue patina with some heavy dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is in mint to superb "as found" condition with no breaks. This piece also has a relatively sharp blade edge, and there is little or no wear over the entire piece. For the type see "Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston", by M. Comstock and C. Vermeule III, 1971, no. 1630. The example offered here is very analogous to the example sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2002, no. 18. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $5,975.00 realized. See attached photo.) Another example was offered by Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, for $7500.00. (See the exhibit catalog "Venerable Traditions", published Nov. 2007, no. 26. See attached photo.) Another example was also offered by Charles Ede Ltd., London, published in Greek Antiquities, 2006, no. 37. (4,000.00 Pound estimate.) The attractive piece offered here sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014. Inv.# P33-039-101514c. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre 1800 item #1075483
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This interesting document is a Persian illuminated manuscript page that depicts the Persian mythical hero Rostam on horseback escaping a dragon. This piece is likely late 17th-18th century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches wide by 10.75 inches high. There is some light brown paper ageing seen on the left side and at the bottom of the page, otherwise this intact piece is in superb condition. One side of this page has four lines of elegant nasta'liq script, seen above a fine-line drawn scene, and there are four lines of script seen below. The back side of this detailed document has 20 lines of script, and there are some light red lines that underline sections of script. The fine-line drawn scene has Rostam galloping to the left on horseback, and he is seen looking back at a fire breathing dragon that appears to be emerging from a hidden place. An analogous scene, of Rostam slaying a dragon from horseback with a sword, can be seen on another example offered by Sotheby's New York, "Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art", Oct. 1990, no. 7. (This piece is 7 inches wide by 11.2 inches high, $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photos.) The piece offered here has great detail within the fine-line drawn scene, and the light blue, white, yellow, and red colors are very vibrant. In addition, the sky above the light blue mountains and the saddle blanket are both highlighted with a gold gilt, and this gives the scene an ethereal perspective. The light blue mountains and the foreground are also meant to convey a magical world, as Rostam was known in Persian myth to have carried out the "Seven Labours of Rostam", and the "Third Stage" of this myth involves his faithful horse awakening him in time to escape a monstrous dragon serpent, which later allowed Rostam to be able to slay this monster. This "Third Stage" scene of the "Seven Labours of Rostam" myth is likely what is seen on the manuscript offered here, as Rostam is also the mythical national hero of "Greater Persia" which originated with the first Persian Empire in Persis circa 1400 B.C. This piece is a better example than what is normally seen on the market, and this document also has great eye appeal. This piece is ready for mounting, and is in a protective plastic cover with a hard backing which is made for storage and shipping. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1100413
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive little piece is a Roman glass flask that dates circa mid 1st century A.D. This piece is an early Roman glass vessel that was produced during the early Roman Imperial period. This mint quality vessel is approximately 2.4 inches high, and is in flawless condition. This piece is a deep blue color, and is from a class of Roman glass vessels known as a "cobalt-blue" type. This deep blue color was produced by adding cobalt into the glass, and this color was extremely popular with the Roman elite during the early Imperial period. This scarce vessel has some nice multi-iridescence and some spotty minute root marking, along with some white calcite deposits that are seen mostly on the rounded bottom base of the vessel. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal and is a scarce type with excellent color. For the type see, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", by John W. Hayes, Toronto, 1975, no. 98, p. 51. This piece also comes with a black plexiglas stand. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #665966
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This Roman bronze portrait bust dates circa 2nd century A.D., and is the terminal end for a leg that served as a table support for a folding tripod. These Roman bronze tripods were portable and moved with the Roman armies and/or wealthy families. This piece had a L-shaped hook at the back that supported a caldron that was at the center of the tripod. This piece is in the form of a portrait bust, and may depict the young Roman emperor Caracalla. This bust also has an attribute relative to Herakles, as the figure is seen wearing a lion's skin cloak. The face has a short cropped beard, a rounded nose, and a wide forehead which are prominent features of Caracalla. The head is slightly turned to the right as are many Roman marble portrait busts during this period. The hair is seen as thick rounded curls which may indicate a wig, as Caracalla was known to have worn a golden haired wig that was arranged in the German style. Caracalla was born in 188 A.D., and in 213 A.D. as emperor, he left Rome for Germany and defeated the Alamanni on the upper Rhine River. Caracalla often wore a flowing Gallic cloak which gave him his nickname, and the bust seen here shows a lion's skin cloak that is not only an attribute of Herakles, but is also an attribute of Alexander the Great. After Caracalla's victories in Germany, he planned an invasion of the Parthian east, and in 214 A.D., he mustered a great army for this oriental expedition, including a phalanx of sixteen thousand men, clothed and equipped like the Macedonians of old. Caracalla liked to see himself as a new Alexander the Great, and this may explain the lion's skin cloak seen on this piece. Caracalla met his end in 216 A.D., near Edessa in Media, and was stabbed to death by supporters of Macrinus. This piece may be a portrait of Caracalla for the reasons noted above, and there is a strong possibility that this stylized image is an image of Caracalla as seen in the guise of Alexander the Great. (The portraiture of Alexander the Great is noteworthy for the wide range of styles that were employed to portray his unique physiognomy. The treatment of the hair, for example, can be long and wavy, while others emphasize the cowlick seen above the forehead which is known as the "anastole". This "anastole" can be seen on the piece offered here, with the hair raising up as a curl from the center of the forehead. For several examples of this hair style see F. Antonovich, "Les Metamorphoses divines d'Alexander", Paris, 1996.) This bust is also analogous to the marble bust of Caracalla that is seen in the Staatliche Museen in Berlin, Germany. (See "The Art of Rome" by Bernard Andreae, Abrams Pub., New York, 1977, no. 551.) This marble bust dates circa 212 A.D., and was created on the occasion of Caracalla becoming sole ruler. This marble bust also has large hair curls and bare arms/upper chest, as seen in the bronze bust offered here. This piece is approximately 3 inches high and is mounted on a custom stand. This piece has a superb dark green patina with spotty dark red highlights. Ex: American private collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities New York, Dec. 2006, no. 122. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1329657
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This Greek gold pendant dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 1 inch high, by .65 inches wide, by .26 inches thick, and weighs 3.9 gms. This piece was made of solid sheet gold, and was hammered and folded over molds which formed a pendant that has three tubular compartments. Each of these three compartments contained a blue/purple glass paste inlay that extended past each of the open ends of each tubular compartment. The ancient Greeks, and especially the ancient Egyptians, incorporated the color "blue" into talisman pendants and rings in order to ward off evil and bring good luck. The pendant offered here may have been a talisman pendant of this type, as this piece has an attractive blue/purple glass paste inlay. The top and bottom compartments still retain the original glass paste inlay, while the middle compartment has this missing. There is also a raised decorative cable border seen at each tubular end, and this cable border added extra strength to the open ends of each compartment. There is also an applied hoop seen at one end, and this pendant was likely suspended from a gold chain, and may also have been an element in a large necklace. This piece is complete, save for the missing glass paste inlay in the middle tubular section, and the remaining glass paste inlay is very solid. There are some minute dents and stress cracks which can easily be repaired as well. This piece is a solid example as is, and can easily be worn today. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1108747
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare piece is a Roman marbled glass flask that dates circa 1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 5 inches high, and is in mint quality condition. This piece is a dark green/blue color, has some heavy white calcite deposits on the upper inner surfaces, and some spotty black mineral deposits on the outer surface. This exceptional piece was produced by blending glass rods into the piece, and this process created the "marbled" composition of the vessel which is a heavy, thick-walled vessel. This process also produced a rough surface, and there are also small and large air bubbles that were fused into the glass. This piece was also difficult to produce, and is much rarer than the subsequent Roman blown glass vessels that were thin-walled and mass produced. This piece also has a flattened bottom and easily stands by itself. For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2007, no. 90. (See attached photo. $3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, $6,875.00 realized.) Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1320976
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This Egyptian/Phoenician steatite jewelry mold dates circa 1800-1200 B.C., and is approximately 1.25 inches long, by .65 inches wide, by .4 inches high. This rare piece was carved from a solid and very dense light to dark gray steatite stone, and this piece is a very solid and durable example. This type of piece also had to be very solid, as it was used as a jewelry mold which was used with gold, silver, and bronze sheet that was hammered and/or pressed down over the face of the mold. The face of this interesting steatite mold features a raised and recumbent nude goddess, who is seen laying flat and has her arms and hands holding her breasts. It is a very likely that this nude image is a fertility goddess, and may have been used to produce "votive" type pieces. She also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, or her hair appears to have been styled in this fashion. This mold formed a very clear image of the nude goddess, and a bead or a pendant could have been created, and this mold could have been used to either press this image into the sheet metal being worked, or a ceramic. The raised figure of the goddess also appears to have some slight wear from use, and there are some light brown mineral deposits seen as well. Overall, the condition of this piece is exceptional, and is an intact example. This piece can also be mounted in a modern pendant, and can also be used to create a modern type jewelry piece today. This piece also sits on a custom Plexiglas stand, and simply slides down onto the two support pins. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#12607. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1246498
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This appealing piece is a standing nude Roman bronze Jupiter that dates circa 1st-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands on its belonging square plinth. This standing nude figurine is seen holding an eagle in his outstretched right hand, and is also seen in the act of throwing a lightning bolt with his raised left arm. Jupiter, also known to the ancient Greeks as Zeus, is also seen wearing a cloak draped over his neck and left shoulder. This piece has exceptional facial, hair, and body molding detail which lends this piece a great deal of eye appeal. In addition, this piece has a young, erotic body design which is a Greek convention of art, and this can be seen with the slender legs and semi-muscular designed body. This piece is complete, save for the missing eagle's head, left hand, and probable lightning bolt which may have been in the left hand. This piece has a beautiful even dark to light green glossy patina, and the exceptional glossy patina seen on this Roman bronze figurine is scarce for figurines of this type. The footed bronze plinth also has additional bronze inside, and the bronze plinth is nearly solid, which added extra weight at the bottom of the piece. This extra weight allows this piece to solidly stand in an upright position. This piece was also cast from the top up, and the figurine and bronze plinth were cast as one piece. The bearded Jupiter is seen looking away to his right, and his weight is seen on his right leg in the act of throwing his lightning bolt. An analogous example can be seen in "Master Bronzes from the Classical World" by Mitten and Doeringer, New York, 1967, no. 266. (See attached photo.) A custom black and clear Plexiglas stand is included, and this piece simply sits on the stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1352064
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" plate that dates circa 340-320 B.C., and is approximately 9.8 inches in diameter by 2 inches high. This mint quality vessel is attributed to the Menzies Painter, who likely worked from the workshop of the Patera and Ganymede Painters. This workshop produced some of the best painters for the period, and pieces from this workshop have their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. This mint quality piece has no repair/restoration, and in addition, has very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The top side of this beautiful vessel has a nude winged Eros moving left, and is holding a patera plate in the extended right hand, and a tambourine in the left hand. The facial details of this nude Eros are delicately drawn, and convey a portrait of an eternally young god. The wings are also delicately rendered, and have four dotted lines and a row of white brush lines seen within the wings, and these are some of the artistic hallmarks of the Menzies Painter. There is also a decorated alter seen behind the Eros, and a growing plant and hanging garment at the front. The nude Eros is also seen walking on an "egg-and-dart" decorated ground line, and the scene is framed by an outer "ivy leaf" and inner "wave-pattern" type border. The young nude Eros may also be celebrating the change of seasons, and the reproductive regeneration of the earth. Apulian plates of this type were usually votive, as they represent eternal life for the deceased relative to the scenes that they represent. This piece also has an attractive lustrous black painted reserve at the bottom, along with a raised footed base. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits and minute root marking which are excellent signs of authenticity. This piece also has a TL authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 07B280616. (This piece is also analogous to another example seen in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2005, no. 259. This Christie's example is also 10 inches in diameter, and has a standing nude Eros holding a plate. $4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $3,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) For the type attributed to the Menzies Painter see A.D. Trendall, "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", London, 1989, Fig. 244-247. A custom Plexiglas plate stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the TL document.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This piece is in flawless condition, and has no repair/restoration, cracks, or chips. Vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1342810
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,865.00
This superb coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C. This coin is in EF/EF+ (Extremely Fine/Extremely Fine+) condition, and is 8.6 gms. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. After Alexander the Great's return from Egypt in 331 B.C., Philoxenos was appointed to superintend the collection of the tribute in the provinces north of the Taurus Mountains. In the subsequent distribution of the provinces after the death of Alexander in 323 B.C., Philoxenus was appointed by Perdiccas to succeed Philotas in the government of Cilicia circa 321 B.C. In that same year during the partition of the provinces at Triparadisus after the fall of Perdiccas, Philoxenus was allowed to retain his satrapy of Cilicia, and this was likely the period that the coin offered here was minted. The obverse of this attractive coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a crested Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also coiled locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse has a finely detailed and exceptional standing figure of Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen on the reverse of this coin is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. Another example of the same type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047, $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5000.00 realized. References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: