Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This attractive piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and it has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (See "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58, for an analogous example.) The piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this quality. Ex: private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327997
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This cute standing bronze bull is complete, and dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.5 inches long, by 2.25 inches high. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is solid, and was cast as one piece. This scarce Greek bronze is of the type that have been found at Delphi, Olympia, and Samos. This piece was also likely votive in nature, and this is why this type of piece has been found at these sacred Greek sites. (For an analogous example found at Olympia, see: H.V. Herrmann, "Die Kessel der Orientalalisierrnden Zeit, Teil 1, OlympForsch VI", 1966, no. 114.) This piece has round almond shaped eyes, a tail designed between the legs, and a thick neck which are all features that are seen in ancient Greek art during the early Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This period is also known as the "Orientalizing" period of Greek art, as there was also extensive trade between Greece and the Levant (eastern Mediterranean), and this is also why this type of piece has been found throughout the ancient Greek, and Near eastern regions such as Anatolia. This complete piece also has a dark brown and green patina, with red highlights. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in superb condition. The piece offered here also appears to be pulling back with the weight of it's body, as a domesticated animal would tend to do, and this would also explain the "cropped horn" design of this piece. This type of solid cast votive bull is scarce, and not often seen on the market. Ex: Leo Mildenberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1970's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2004, no. 372. Published: "More Animals in Ancient Art from the Leo Mildenberg Collection". by A.P. Kozloff and D.G. Mitten, Part III, Mainz am Rhein Pub., 1986, no. 17. (See attached photo.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #584291
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,175.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century AD and is in flawless condition. This piece is approximately 3.25 inches high, is larger than most examples, and has a nice silver/gold patina. This piece has a light blue-green color and has spotty mineral deposits. The name "sprinkler" flask is a modern day name given to a flask of this type, as it was designed with an interior valve and a wide, flat opening. This allowed for the contained liquid to sprinkle, rather than pour. This piece was also mold made from two separate halves, and the main body has a lattice-work type design. This piece is scarce in this condition with this clear molded design. This piece is seen on a clear plexiglas stand that is included. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1313512
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This appealing piece is a Greek Hellenistic period bronze torso of a striding Herakles, and dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.1 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This piece shows a striding nude Herakles who is seen wearing his lion's skin cloak draped over his left shoulder and arm, and this cloak is attached by a round fibula seen on his right shoulder. This lion's skin cloak is also designed with a stippled dotted design, which denotes this garment as being made from an animal skin. This torso has an intact left arm, and this Herakles figurine appears to be holding a round patera or possibly a vessel of some sort. This figurine also has both muscular legs, with the right leg seen striding forward, and the movement of this powerfully muscular body is easily seen. The torso is very well defined, and displays a very high degree of art, and is much better than most figurines of this type. This attractive piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and is evenly seen around the entire piece. This piece is an exceptional Greek bronze torso with an equally exceptional patina, and is scarce on today's market in this condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304587
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This attractive piece is a silver bowl that is Greco-Thracian, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This large piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece is intact, and is a complete example that has a nice dark gray patina with some spotty dark black deposits. In addition, there is some minute root marking and an attractive multi-colored iridescence that can be seen on various sections of the piece. This piece has a hand beaten "floral pattern" seen on the outer side, and the negative image of this design can also be seen on the inside inner surface. The "floral pattern" has a circular roundel center, and the tips of the individual pedals have semi-circular curves that were each hand stamped with a punch. This piece also has a rolled edge that folds towards the inside, and was heat sealed. There is also an attached single silver "ring handle" that is seen on one side near the top rim of the vessel. This single silver "ring handle" has a round attachment plate that has a decorative stamped semi-circular pattern as well. The silver ring itself is very durable, and is very thick which is a strong indicator that this piece was meant to have been hung, and may have been hung and used in a private home, on a wagon, or a horse. The ancient Thracians and Scythians valued vessels made from precious metals, and were also a mobile culture. This piece may have been produced in one of the Greek Thracian coastal cities, and was sold or traded to the interior, but the artistic style of this piece points to the region that runs around the eastern and northern coasts of the Black Sea. ( A silver bottle with an analogous floral pedal design and construction technique is seen in "Scythian Art" by Georges Charriere, Alpine Fine Arts Pub., 1979, no. 349. This silver bottle is attributed to the 4th century B.C., and is from modern day southern Ukraine. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is a rare example, and large silver vessels of this type are seldom seen on the market. Ex: Michael Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre 1492 item #1224239
Apolonia Ancient Art
$7,685.00
This superb Roman bronze of Attis dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 5 inches high by 3.5 inches high. This piece is in superb to mint condition, and is complete with no repair/restoration. This piece also has silver inlaid eyes which add to the lively and animated facial expression of this exceptional Roman bronze. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute black mineral deposits, fine hair detail, and a finely designed Phrygian cap. There is a round hook at the back of the neck which may have been attached to a suspension chain, as this piece may have been part of a suspended bronze vessel or a furniture object. There is additional detail with incised dotted decorative crosses and line work seen on each side of the Phyrgian cap, which is also an attribute associated with the deity Attis. The head of this piece is also modeled in the round, and extends slightly forward from the lower bust, and this is another indication that this piece was likely attached to a rounded vessel. In addition, the majority of Roman applique pieces are not modeled in the round in the upper section like the example offered here, and simply have an open end at the back of the head. This piece therefore has a dual design, not only as an applique, but it is also designed like a Roman portrait bust. According to Phyrgian and Roman myth, the youth Attis was madly loved by the Phyrgian goddess Cybele, and she loved him so jealously that she could not bear him marrying the nymph Sagaritis. When Attis later proposed to Sagaritis, in a rage, she made him go out of his mind, and he castrated himself and died from his wound. Cybele, struck with grief, revived her dead lover and the pair were worshipped together throughout Phrygia and the Roman world. In a Lydian version of the myth, Attis is not killed by his castration, but by a wild boar, like Adonis. For the myth of Attis and Cybele see: "Gods and Mortals in Classical Mythology" by Michael Grant, New York, 1979. The lively and animated face seen on this appealing piece, reveals the mad love that Attis had for Cybele and Sagaritis, and as such, this piece displays a high degree of art. This piece hangs on a custom black plexiglas and steel stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the buyer. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1307575
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This exceptional Greek ceramic is a Messapian trozella that dates circa 400-300 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.9 inches high, by 8.25 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has two applied strap handles to a pear-shaped body that has a raised foot. The handles also have four disks built into the handle junctions, and the description "trozella" has the meaning "little wheels", and "trozella" is a very appropriate description for vessels of this type. The esoteric piece offered here is an early example, as it has a shorter pear-shaped body with a footed base, rather than an extended body with a raised foot with a spread base. The earlier examples are much rarer, and often have beautiful detailed painting as the example has here. Vessels of this type also generally have painted sections that are worn, and in many cases the painted images are completely worn off, but the images seen on this exquisite vessel are nearly entirely intact, and can clearly be seen on both sides of the vessel. These vessels were also painted after the vessel was fired in the kiln, and were quickly re-fired again, and this is why the painted images seen on vessels of this type are generally faded and are not very bright. The painting seen on this exceptional piece is extremely fine and detailed, and shows reddish-brown acanthus patterns on the upper shoulder that are connected with a single fine line with added dots. There are added geometric "cross-and-line" patterns seen on various sections of the vessel, and the two boxes seen on the upper shoulder have dark red defining lines. The overall esoteric design of this vessel, along with the delicate painting, make this vessel one of the finest examples of this type that has been on the market. The description "Messapian" also refers to the Greek colonists and native Greek peoples that settled in the southern heel of Italy. It is unkown if this early example was produced locally, or was a production in a Greek city made for import into the region. Given the delicate Greek acanthus designs, and the fact that this piece is a rarer earlier example, I am leaning to the latter scenario that this piece may have been produced for import into the region. This piece also has some minute dark spotty black mineral deposits, along with some heavier root marking seen on the inside of the vessel and the upper flat rim. Another analogous vessel that is a later type, was offered by Sotheby's Antiquities, Dec. 2007, no. 129. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $4,688.00 realized.) The vessel offered here is rare on the market, as it is an early example, has delicately painted fine design work, and is in mint condition. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: New York private collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric period circa 750-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are conical in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. These beads have an attractive dark green patina, and are all in superb condition. These beads are strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, as well as being votive, and are now scarce in the market. As a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #598355
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,875.00
This piece is a East Greek silver ladle that is of "Achaemenid" artistic style, otherwise known as the Persian Empire. This piece was likely made by a Greek artist, and this piece dates circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is a superb example and is complete, with no repair and/or breaks. This piece has a beautiful light gray patina, and has not been over cleaned, as there are several minute spotty black surface deposits. This piece was hammered into the shape seen here, and it has a shallow rounded bowl, a slender handle section of octagonal construction, and a looped rounded terminal section that terminates in the head of a bull/calf. The head of the bull/calf is finely molded and engraved. (For other published examples see Dietrich von Bothmer, "A Greek and Roman Treasury", The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New York, 1984, p. 41, nos. 60-61.) This piece is also very similar to the piece seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, Important Antiquities from the Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, Dec. 1992, no. 22. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates.) The Schimmel example is not only similar, but it is almost an exact match to the piece offered here. The bull/calf head is very analogous relative to both examples, and this is an indication that there is a possibility that both of these pieces came from the same workshop. In addition, the heights of both examples are nearly the same, as the Schimmel example is approximately 7.6 inches high, and the example offered here is approximately 7.75 inches high and weighs approximately 59 gms. These rare pieces were likely used to dip highly concentrated wine into water, as this allowed for an exact mix of wine to water, and the piece offered here and the Schimmel example may have both been made to exact specifications for mixing wine to water. The fact that this type of piece is silver, also points to the probably that this piece was formal table ware for a wealthy Greek noble. There is also a Byzantine period cross and globe stamped into the back side of the ladle, which is seen at the base of the handle. (See photo.) This piece was used later on, probably in the early Byzantine period circa 4th-5th century A.D., and likely in a Christian church or home. This piece survived for a long period of time, as it was utilized down into the Byzantine period. Another probable reason why this piece was used for a long period of time is that it is silver, and has a great deal of utility as a ritual piece. A custom black/clear plexiglas base is included and the piece is mounted on the base with clay and can easily be removed. Ex: F. Bernheimer collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1989, no. 256. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: R. Poland collection. Ex: Pierre Berge & Associates, Archeologie, Paris, May 2011, no. 209. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport Certificate.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1281148
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This pleasing Roman marble is a portrait of a young woman that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high by 2.25 inches wide. This piece has a break at the back, at the bottom of the neck, and at the back right side of the head. The flat break at the back is an indication that this piece was once part of a large carved relief, possibly a sarcophagus panel, and was broken away from the main part of the sculpture. This attractive bust is also designed with a three-quarter facing profile, and this is a Greek convention of art that was extensively copied by the Romans circa 1st-2nd century A.D. In addition, the head is leaning to the left, with the neck seen at an angle moving down to the right, and this is an indication that the body of this young girl was portrayed with movement, as seen within the entire scene that this this bust was originally attached to. The face of the young girl appears to be serene, and conveys an eternally young look which may also be an indication that this is also meant to be a portrait of a goddess, possibly Diana (Artemis) or Juno (Hera). The hair seen on this young portrait is also arranged in three layers, which was a Roman hair style that was popular in the 2nd century A.D. The face of this piece is also intact, with no breaks to the nose, chin, and cheeks. The mouth is also rendered in a very sensual way, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is also somewhat analogous to the numerous Roman marble portraits that were produced circa 161-176 A.D. of Faustina II, who was the daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina I, and was later married to Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. (See attached photo of a young marble portrait bust of Faustina II, circa 161-176 A.D., and seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Vol. XXI, 2010, no. 26 by Royal Athena Galleries, New York.) The attractive piece offered here has a nice light tan patina, with some spotty dark brown and black mineral deposits, which are also readily seen over the entire piece. Overall, this piece is an attractive Roman marble, and is a choice example. This piece is also mounted on an attractive custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1247108
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,865.00
These two superb bronze plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, and date circa 5th-3rd century B.C. These two pieces are approximately 4.25 inches long by 2.3 inches high, and have an attractive dark brown/black patina with gold gilt and dark red highlights. There is also some minute root marking seen mostly on the back side of each piece, and there is some dark green mineralization seen in sections of each piece as well. Both pieces have very little wear, were likely votive, and were both cast from the lost-wax process, while the wax model was formed in a two-piece mold. These pieces were made as a matching pair, and were possibly attached to a wooden sarcophagus, a burial garment, or the most likely, a leather belt. This type of piece is usually found in pairs, which may also tie in with the "master of the animals" cult that was associated with many cultures in the ancient Near East circa 1000-100 B.C. These plaques are attributed to the Ordos culture, which was located in modern day Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. Most Ordos bronzes of this type can also be associated with the Xiongnu, who were a Mongolian steppes nomadic tribe that had to contend with the Chinese during the Han period. The term "Ordos bronzes" has been applied rather indiscriminately to all "animal style" objects found in the vast northern border areas with China, irrespective of place of discovery or dating. What is known is that the two plaques offered here stylistically match other examples found in Eastern Mongolia and Southern Siberia. For the type see "Nomadic Art of the Eastern Eurasian Steppes: The Eugene V. Thaw and Other New York Collections", Yale University Press, 2002. The pieces offered here show a standing animal which resembles a wolf, which is seen devouring it's prey, which appears to be a horned ibex. The horned ibex is seen with it's head in the mouth of the wolf, and it's curved horn is seen on the ground, as head of the ibex is seen turned around with a twisted elongated neck. In addition, the ibex may be a young baby animal, which may also explain the size difference between both the ibex and the wolf, but in reality, the ibex portrayed on these plaques may be an adult animal, and the carnivorous wolf may have been designed in an oversized manner to portray a more powerful creature. The wolf may also represent a "spirit animal" and may not be a wolf, but rather a creature that somewhat resembles a wolf or a feline. The creature portrayed here has a curled tail like a feline, and an elongated snout like a wolf, and the creature seen here may be a combination of both animals. The ibex head can also be best seen with the entire piece being viewed upside down, which is a convention of art that is common to the Ordos culture. (See attached close up photo.) This piece also has an attachment hook seen in the top center of the wolf's back, a small hole seen in the tip of the tail, and another hole designed within the ibex horn and front leg. These were the three points as to how this piece could have been attached to a leather belt with leather ties. These plaques have a very powerful image, and may have served as a "power type" piece for the wearer. Additional pieces of this type can be seen in "Treasures of the Eurasian Steppes" by Ariadne Galleries, New York, 1998. The pieces offered here are in superb to mint condition, have a high degree of eye appeal, and are better examples of this type that are normally seen. These pieces also are attached within an attractive black wooden framed shadow box, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private United Kingdom collection, circa 1980's. Note: additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1290668
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This attractive coin is a Greek EL (electron) hekte that was minted in Kyzikos, circa 550-500 B.C. This scarce piece shows the winged helmeted head of Perseus on the obverse, with a tunny fish behind; and the reverse is a quadripartite incuse square punch. This piece is superb quality (EF+/EF+), is approximately 12mm, 2.69gms, is well centered for the type, and has a lustrous high relief sharp portrait of the mythical figure Perseus. The portrait is also seen in the "Greek Archaic" artistic style, and is seen with a large almond eye, a large nose and chin, and a slight smile. "Greek Archaic" portraiture is also a very desirable feature highly valued by collectors of ancient Greek coins, and the portrait seen here is a fine example. There is also an unobtrusive test mark behind the bust, and is very difficult to see, and does not detract from the detailed and high relief portrait of Perseus. Kyzikos was located on the southwest shore of the Propontis in ancient Mysia next to the river Aisepos. The city's prosperity was due principally to its two fine harbors, which made it a convenient stopping point for merchant ships trading between the Aegean and Black Seas, and the coin seen here likely was made to facilitate port and shipping fees. Kyzikos principle export was the tunny fish, which is often seen on the obverse of it's coinage. The prevalence of winged beings seen on Kyzikene coinage is a reflection of an archaic mythical convention of art, that assigned wings to most divine or sacred entities as a symbol of their nature, and in the case of the gods, of their power to move across great distances. On the coin offered here, we see Perseus, who was the son of Zeus and the mortal Danae, who was the daughter of the king of Argos; and as Perseus had divine status, he was widely worshiped and admired among the ancient Greeks. On the exceptional coin offered here, he is depicted as a divine entity wearing a winged helmet, which is the so-called "Helm of Hades", which rendered its owner invisible to other supernatural entities and mortals. This winged helmet was given to him by Athena, in order to help him evade the gorgons Sthenno and Euryale after he had slain and decapitated their sister Medusa. The coin offered here is scarce to rare on the market, and is a rare depiction of Perseus. Von Fritze no. 65. SNG von Aulock no. 1186. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1346703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This scarce piece is a Greek bronze amulet that is seen in the form of the Greek goddess Baubo, and dates circa 5th-3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high by .65 inches wide, and is a complete example with no restoration/repair. This piece has a nice dark green patina with some light brown deposits, and is a solid cast example that likely served as a wearable amulet that hung from a necklace. This piece has a suspension hoop seen at the top of the head of the goddess, who is seen nude with her hands on her knees, and is revealing her over-sized vulva. The goddess Baubo was a fun-loving, bawdy, jesting, sexually liberated - yet very wise - goddess who played a crucial role in preserving the fertility of the land in ancient Greece. According to ancient Greek myth, Baubo stopped to rest in the city of Eleusis and had a conversation with the depressed Demeter, who was in deep mourning over the loss of her daughter Persephone who was abducted by Hades, the god of the underworld. Demeter abandoned her duties to bring fertility back to the land, until Baubo began chatting with Demeter using risqué remarks that brought a smile back to Demeter's face. Then, Baubo suddenly lifted her skirt revealing her vulva to Demeter who responded with a hearty belly laugh. Demeter's spirits were uplifted, and she was then able to persuade Zeus to release Persephone, which restored the fertility of the land. The piece offered here may have been worn by a woman, and/or a person who was also connected with the Eleusinian Mysteries. The followers of Baubo believed that enmity could be turned into friendship, and that all people are an integral part of the great cycles of nature. This piece is a scarce to rare example, and is a solid example that can easily be worn today. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1310114
Apolonia Ancient Art
Sold
These pieces are a matching pair of Greek Apulian "Red-Figure" oinochoe, and date circa 340-330 B.C. These pieces are approximately 9 inches high, and are attributed to the "Darius-Underworld" workshop. These attractive pieces are also attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter, who is thought to have worked in the "Darius-Underworld" workshop that produced several of the best painters for the period. These various painters also had their own distinctive attributes that are seen in their compositions. These superb to mint quality pieces have no apparent repair/restoration and are intact, and in addition, have very vibrant black, white, yellow, and dark orange colors. The front side of both of these attractive vessels have a bust of a beautiful young woman facing left, who is seen wearing a hair sakkos, large painted white earrings, and a white dotted necklace. The faces of the young woman portrayed on these two superb vessels are very sweet and youthful images, and are better examples than most images that are usually seen on Greek Apulian vessels of this type. These pieces also display a white comb above the forehead which is a hallmark attributed to the "Stoke-on-Trent" painter. The young woman seen on these pieces is known as the "Lady of Fashion", and likely represents Demeter or Persephone, who was tied to the Greek myth of the change of seasons and the appearance of renewed life every spring. These pieces also have extensive acanthus floral patterns seen behind and on each side of the vessel, and have a raised footed ring base. These pieces both have some spotty black mineral deposits, and some attractive minute root marking. These pieces are also analogous to another matching pair seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1985, no. 274. ($1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #891841
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This extremely rare Greek Attic piece is a blackware glazed pyxis that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and has some heavy white calcite deposits that are seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also has decorative white concentric circles that are seen on the top lid. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter, and has some glaze loss, seen mostly on the top lid of the vessel. This top lid is actually a hidden cup that lifts out of the top of the vessel, and is approximately 2.4 inches high by 2.6 inches in diameter. This pyxis also has some analogous design features that are seen on Attic "West Slope" pyxides, such as high thin walls and an extended ring base. Greek Attic ceramics are often thin walled, as they were created with a high firing temperature, and this produced a durable light weight ceramic as the piece offered here. This type of vessel was often "votive", and were placed in tombs, and served a variety of purposes. Some of these contained personal items that belonged to the deceased, some served as cinerary urns, and others contained cosmetics. The piece offered here may not have been exclusively "votive" in nature, as the lid/cup may have been used to measure a liquid or a solid such as grain. Whatever the case, this piece is an extremely rare Greek vessel that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Private Florida collection (1980's). Ex: Arte Primitivo, Fine Antiquities Auction 2005. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1103081
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This appealing piece is an Egyptian polychrome wooden face mask that dates Third Intermediate Period, circa 1075-715 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.75 inches high, and is a near complete facial section of a wooden sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece has red outlined lips, and red and blue details which are painted over a golden yellow ground that covers the carved wooden surface. There are two dowel holes which were used to attach this esoteric facial section to the main body of the sarcophagus mask/lid. This piece also has some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and the condition of the carved wooden fabric is exceptional. This piece was carved in a very esoteric manner, as seen with the detailed lips and raised eyes. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and fits on a custom black plexiglas and marble stand. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1979, no. 273. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, "The Charles Pankow Collection of Egyptian Art", Dec. 2004, no. 148. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1102815
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This attractive piece is a Byzantine bronze cross that has a nice silver inlaid design. This piece dates circa 4th-7th century A.D., and is approximately 1.9 inches high by 1.9 inches high by 1/16th inch thick. This piece has an attractive silver inlaid design which has a detailed "circle-and-line" type design. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some light green and red surface deposits. There are also five small holes seen in this piece which were likely used to sew this piece into a garment. This piece is in superb condition, and could easily be worn as a pendant today. This piece also comes with a custom black plexiglas display stand, and can easily be removed, as it simply hangs on the stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1265926
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This scarce to rare coin is a Greek gold Quarter Stater attributed to Philip II, circa 323-315 B.C. This coin is approximately 12mm wide, weighs 1.91 gms, and is in superb condition which is (EF+/EF). This attractive coin shows a well defined Herakles head facing right, seen in high relief within a dotted border. The Herakles head is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress which has well defined detail, and is also well centered on the flan. The reverse shows a "au-dessus de l'arc" symbol above, a stringed bow, Greek lettering in the name of "Philip", a Herakles club, and a trident symbol which are all grouped on the reverse. The lettering and the symbols are also slightly double truck in sections, and the flan is slightly cupped. There are some minute minor excavation marks and root marking seen mainly on the reverse, and this coin is in much better condition than most examples of this coin, as the majority of specimens are in very fine (VF) condition and have a shallow relief die on the obverse. This piece also has a nice patina, with some spotty mint luster. This coin matches die set D-84/R-59, no. 129, which is seen in "Le Monnayage D'Argent Et D'Or De Philippe II" by Georges Le Rider, Paris, 1977. La Rider also classifies this coin as being in his "Group III", minted in the Pella Mint, and having a reverse type that shows the "au-dessus de l'arc" and trident symbols together in combination. There are fewer examples of this coin type seen in "Group III", as compared to the numerous examples and die combinations seen in "Group II". This coin is still a scarce coin type even for "Group II", and is rarer for "Group III". The reason for this is that the prior group was minted during the lifetime of Alexander the Great, who continued to mint this type after the death of his father, Philip II, circa 336 B.C. The coin offered here began to be minted for a short time after the death of Alexander the Great, circa 323 B.C., and this is why this type is a scarce to rare issue. The minting techniques of this attractive coin also changed, with the flans of "Group II" being more concave, and are generally seen with a circular line that runs around the perimeter of the flan and frames the symbols and lettering seen on the reverse. The coin offered here does not have the circular line on the reverse as noted above, and has no dotted border seen on the reverse as well. This fractional denomination is also much more rarer than the larger gold staters from the same period, as this fractional coin type was only minted when a large amount of metal was available, which allowed for the minting of additional denominations such as this quarter stater. An exceptional coin that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: