Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #988348
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This piece is a Greek black glazed ceramic that is Greek Attic, and it dates circa 5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.3 inches high by 4.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in superb condition. The superb condition of this piece is also readily evident, as there is some black glaze seen on the bottom of the stem base, and this glaze has not worn off from a lot of use. (See attached photo.) There is also the strong possibility that this piece was made solely as a votive offering, as there is no wear on the bottom of the stem base. This piece has some multi-colored iridescense patina over the black glaze, and there are attractive minute root marks seen in various sections of the vessel as well. This piece has no handles that were attached to the main body of the vessel, and as such, is a scarce Attic black glazed type. This piece was used for drinking wine and/or water, and is a type that was used for everyday use, and may have been made as a votive offering. This piece is a nice large example for the type, and also has an esoteric shape. Ex: Private Swiss collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1278991
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This large Greek ceramic is a Boeotian black-gloss kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 10 inches wide from handle to handle, and is generous in size for the type and gracefully proportioned. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, as it also has a rich deep loustrous black glaze seen over the entire piece, save the bottom of the vessel that has a reddish-tan reserve. The interior of the vessel also has an even deep black glaze, and this is an indication that this vessel was specifically made to hold a liquid, such as wine. This piece is catagorized as being a "Type D", and is the largest type for the period, and is amoung the largest Boeotian black-glazed kantharos cups. (For the type see: "Black Glaze Pottery from Rhitsona in Boeotia", by P.N. Ure, Oxford University Press, 1913, Pl. XIII.) This type of kantharos is also known as a "Sessile" type kantharos, which is characterized by it's lack of a raised stemmed base and a small torus disk foot. The form of this vessel is wheel made from a very fine reddish-tan colored clay, and the bowl and base was made as one single piece, with the large arching strap handles applied separately before firing. Small "spurs" project from the lower part of the handles, and they are likely "finger-grips". Flat bars connect the upper part of the handles to the main body of the vessel, and this creates a volute-like profile. The body of the cup has a thin flared upper rim, and a large torus ring foot with a flat base. The shape of this piece was made and used throughout ancient Greece, and the main areas of production for these black-glazed vessels was Attica and the region of Boeotia just northeast of the Gulf of Corinth. The reddish color of the fabric of this vessel also suggests that it may be of Attic manufacture, and/or is a product of an Athenian potter working in Boeotia using Attic source material. (This theory was also put forth by P.N. Ure in the work noted above, p.12, and he comments on the Boeotian black glazed vessels from the Fifth Century: "Such vessels as these and those of the Teisias Group suggest Boeotia occupied one of the very foremost positions in connection with the black glaze industry of this period. Wheather it was as producer or mearly as a purchaser is another question".) This type of vessel offered here is also seen on "Attic red-figure" ceramics that portray Dionysaic drinking scenes that often show satyrs dancing with a cup of this type. It may be that this type of cup was produced more for drinking ceremonies, rather than for funeral purposes which seems to be the case for smaller black-glazed vessels of this type. This attractive piece is intact, has no repair/restoration, and is in it's natural mint to superb "as found" condition. This piece has some nice minute root marking, and some heavy and spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel. An attractive large vessel for the type, and as such, is scarce on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1039437
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This flawless piece is an intact Greek olpe vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This esoteric piece has an attractive tan earthern glaze and is made from a light red clay. This piece has nice "as found" deposits, a flat bottom, and a single strap handle. The large open and round mouth was also designed to pour liquid very rapidly, which lends this vessel very well as a table vessel. Vessels of this type were widely produced in the ancient Greek world, and this vessel shape was also produced in bronze. In fact, our research reveals that bronze vessels of this type seem to be more common than the terracotta vessels of this type, and in addition, this type of terracotta vessel seen in this mint condition is scarce, as most examples have some degree of repair/restoration. This piece probably was used for everyday use and may also been a votive example, and the latter case is probably the case here, as this piece has no apparent wear from use. This piece probaly was used for water and/or wine. A nice example seldom seen in this condition. Ex: Bonhams Antiquities, London, April 2004, no. 343. Ex: Private Ill. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre 1492 item #1268018
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,265.00
This beautiful and vibrant piece is a Greek Apulian lidded mug that dates circa 310 B.C. This piece has been attributed to the Kantharos Group, and is approximately 8.25 inches high with the lid. This beautiful piece is also known as a kothon, and this type of vessel normally has a knobbed lid and extended neck, as seen with the piece offered here. This piece is mint quality, with no repair/restoration, and has very vibrant white, yellow, red, and black colors. This piece has a rounded knobbed handle seen at the top center of the lid, and there are two female heads seen on the top of the lid, along with a detailed acanthus pattern between. There is also a large female head seen on the main body of the vessel facing left, along with the top section of a white and red wing that is seen curling up at the front of her face. The female head is also seen wearing a detailed sakkos in her hair that is highlighted with dotted and cross patterns, and is also wearing an elaborate earring and dotted necklace. This figure likely represents a winged "Eros", and this portrait type is also known as a "lady of fashion", and is thought by many academics to also represent Demeter and/or Persephone. To the ancient Greeks the fertility of the ground was closely associated with the autumnal sowing. The return of life and burial is symbolized in the myth of Persephone's abduction and return, and gave rise to the ritual of the Eleusinian Mysteries, in which the worshippers believed that the restoration of the goddess to the upper world promised the faithful their own resurrection from death. This lidded vessel probably held a burial offering such as grain, or a product that could have been used by the deceased in the afterlife. This attractive vessel also has highly decorative floral patterns that are seen on each side of the lady's portrait, and a single "Herakles-knot" type designed handle. This piece is better than most examples of it's type, and another analogous example of this type of vessel of nearly the same size and condition was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2011, no. 138. ($3,000.00-$5000.00 estimates, $5,250.00 realized. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is among one of the best examples offered on the market, and is scarce in this mint condition. Ex: G. van Driesum collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Michael Waltz collection, Germany, circa 1970's-1980's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,365.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1018188
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This rare piece is made from a red/brown terracotta and has spotty light brown earthern deposits. This piece is a terracotta model of a theatrical mask and dates circa mid 4th century B.C. This superb example is approximately 5.3 inches high by 4.5 inches wide, and this is the normal size for a votive mask of this type. This piece is intact, and is 100% original. There are some spotty dark brown mineral deposits, and some minute stress cracks and pitting which is normally seen on a piece of this type as it is mold made. This superb piece has a very dramatic face which depicts a youth with a slightly open mouth with wide open eyes. This mask was likely votive, and this piece may also have been buried with an individual who was active in the theatrical arts. (For additional examples see "The Greek World, Art and Civilization in Magna Graecia and Sicily", edited by Giovanni Pugliese Carratelli, Rizzoli Pub., New York, 1996, pp.713-717.) The top forehead is not extended back, as real hair and/or a wreath was added to this piece for added effect. This type of design would also serve an individual well in life, as well as the afterlife, and this mask may have been intended to depict a character such as Hecuba and/or Taltibio, from the Greek tragedy "Le Troiane" by Euripides. This mask, as a votive burial object, may have been intended to represent Hecuba's expression of profound pain and/or Taltibio's contrasting sentiment, which in both cases allude to the moment when the small Trojan baby Astyanax was barbarously killed. The horror of this moment was magnified, as the small Astyanax was thrown down from the walls of Troy by Menelaus, while his mother Andromache is taken away as a slave as the flames rise over Troy. These votive masks were intended to represent characters in ancient Greek tragedies, as noted above, as well as comedies. In any case, very few examples come to the market and are rare. This piece is mounted on a museum quality custom stand and has great eye appeal. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #891841
Apolonia Ancient Art
$965.00
This extremely rare Greek Attic piece is a blackware glazed pyxis that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is intact, with no apparent repair/restoration, and has some heavy white calcite deposits that are seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also has decorative white concentric circles that are seen on the top lid. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter, and has some glaze loss, seen mostly on the top lid of the vessel. This top lid is actually a hidden cup that lifts out of the top of the vessel, and is approximately 2.4 inches high by 2.6 inches in diameter. This pyxis also has some analogous design features that are seen on Attic "West Slope" pyxides, such as high thin walls and an extended ring base. Greek Attic ceramics are often thin walled, as they were created with a high firing temperature, and this produced a durable light weight ceramic as the piece offered here. This type of vessel was often "votive", and served a variety of purposes. Some of these contained personal items that belonged to the deceased, some served as cinerary urns, and others contained cosmetics. The piece offered here may not have been exclusively "votive" in nature, as the lid/cup may have been used to measure a liquid or a solid such as grain. Whatever the case, this piece is an extremely rare Greek vessel and type that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Private Florida collection (1980's). Ex: Arte Primitivo, Fine Antiquities, Auction 2005. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1246377
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This mint quality piece is a large Greek "Messapian" column krater that dates circa 4th century B.C. This appealing and large scale piece is approximately 14.7 inches high, by 13 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, and is mint quality with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a dark brown glaze with cream colored highlights, and has an attractive wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. In addition, this piece has two lines seen on the body above the raised footed base, and has a dark brown line pattern seen on the upper flat rim. This piece is a much better example than what is normally seen, as the dark brown glaze seen on the majority of these large scale pieces is mostly worn away. The reason for this, is that the dark brown glaze is very thin, and was applied simply as a "wash type" glaze over the light tan clay before it was fired in the kiln. However, the attractive dark brown glaze, seen on the exceptional piece offered here, is mostly intact. This type of "Messapian" piece is also much rarer than the more common Greek "Apulian" and "Lucanian" column-krater types, and according to A.D. Trendall in "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, p. 18: "The shapes used for South Italian vases in the fifth century were largely derived from Attic models (see Glossary of Shapes); later, some local forms were introduced, amoung which the most characteristic are the nestoris or trozzella (in Lucanian, e.g., cat. nos. 4, 10, and 11, and Apulian, e.g., cat. no. 134), which seems to have been of native, probably Messapian origin, and the bail-amphora (in Campanian e.g., cat. no. 90, where it goes back to the black-figure prototypes of the sixth century). Many shapes are common to all fabrics (e.g., bell-and calyx-kraters, lekanides, hydriai, lebetes gamikoi, oinochoai, skyphoi); for others there were decided local preferences. Thus the loutrophoros and phiale (dish) are confined to Apulia; the volute-krater, column-krater, Panathenaic amphora, pelike, kantharos, and rhyton are rarely found outside of Apulia and Lucania; the neck amphora, bottle, and skyphoid pyxis are common only in the western fabrics." The piece offered here is also likely votive, and this also explains it's mint quality condition. The bottom is also closed, and this vessel may have held a votive offering such as grain for use in the afterlife. This piece has some heavy white calcite deposits and some minute root marking, as this attractive column-krater is in mint "as found" condition. This piece is also classified as being "Messapian", which refers to the geographical region of southern Italy near and around ancient Taranto on the Adriatic coast. Pottery classified as "Messapian" also refers to native and/or non-Greek pottery in southern Italy, along with the "Peucetian" and "Daunian" types, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" piece is rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional decorative object. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1040039
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a large Greek pitcher that dates to the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. This piece is approximately 10.75 inches high by 8.5 inches in diameter. This superb piece is a light gray terracotta and is near mint quality. This intact vessel also has no noticeable chips and/or abrasions which are usually associated with ceramics of this type. This attractive piece also has nice light to dark brown earthen deposits and minute root marking. There is a single strap handle and trefoil mouth which allowed water and/or wine to be poured in a controlled manner. This piece also sits on a ring base that stabilizes this vessel a great deal, and together with the trefoil spout, are design innovations that represent a huge leap in ancient Greek ceramic design/production. This piece is scarce in this size and near mint condition, and is a very attractive early Greek light gray ceramic. Another analogous example nearly the same size is seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, London, July 1991, no.245. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #997403
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This piece is a Greek lidded vessel that dates to the Late Bronze Age period, circa 12th-11th century B.C. This piece is approximately 8.5 inches high by 7.5 inches in diameter, and is intact in mint condition. This piece has attractive spotty white calcite deposits with some root marking, and a light brown earthen over glaze. This piece is a light red terracotta, and the lid fits perfectly into place. This piece also has Mycenaean artistic style, as seen with the two looped handles, peaked lid with knob grip, and the rounded shape of the main body. (For many Mycenaean vessels see "Mycenae and the Mycenaean Age" by George Mylonas, Princeton University Press, 1966.) This type of vessel also served as a burial urn, and held the cremated remains of the deceased. This type of vessel was then placed in a cist grave with lined stones, or within an enclosure of piled rocks, and the entire tomb was then covered with a mound of dirt. This type of burial was common throughout the ancient Greek world during the Bronze Age. The vessel offered here is intact, and is scarce in this condition. Ex: J. Malter collection, Los Angeles. CA. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1191314
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This exceptional piece is an X-large Greek Attic lekythos that dates circa 5th century B.C. This beautiful large piece is approximately 16.75 inches high by 4.7 inches in diameter. This exceptionally large example is intact, and has no repair/restoration. This is rare for a large scale lekythos to be intact, as they are normally broken at the neck. The neck seen on this beautiful piece extends gracefully upward, and has an attached handle with an open lipped opening. There is also a small round hole in the body seen centered below where the handle attaches to the main body of the vessel, and this was added so that liquid could more easily pour from the vessel. This piece also has original white ground material that is seen on the main body of the vessel, and in addition, there are minute black spotty mineral deposits seen on various sections of the vessel. The main body also gradually tapers down from the upper shoulder to the round base, and this gives this vessel a very elegant shape. This piece also has a flat bottom and this vessel stands very solid as well. Greek Attic white-ground lekythos of this type were used primarily for funeral rites, and often had fine-line figural design over the white-ground surface. These vessels were often placed in the tomb, and were often brought to the tomb as offerings by the family of the dead. The fact that the small round hole was added to the vessel is also a good indication that this piece was actually used in a funeral rite, and was then left as an offering. The vessel seen here is much larger than what is normally seen, is an Attic Greek ceramic with a high degree of eye appeal, and is extremely graceful on display. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1276183
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This nice piece is a Greek oinochoe that dates circa 330-310 B.C. This piece is approximately 10.7 inches high, and is in mint to superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has also been attributed to the Stoke-on-Trent Painter, which is a more scarce painter/type than the more common types attributed to the contemporary Kantharos Group. This piece prominently features a female head facing left that is seen wearing a dainty white dotted necklace and a detailed saccos that is seen layered within the hair of the young woman. There is a palmate pattern seen on the backside, and the elegant raised neck has white painted lines with a wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. There are also extensive floral patterns that frame the bust of the young woman on each side, and this attractive piece is also designed with a raised ring base, and these design features give this piece a great deal of eye appeal. The young woman is known as the "Lady of Fashion", and may represent Persephone and the Greek myth of her return from the underworld, which represented the change of the seasons with the renewal of life. This piece has some minute black dotted mineral deposits on various sections of the vessel, and some spotty white calcite deposits which are thicker in the trefoil designed lip opening of the vessel. Overall, this elegant piece is in it's natural "as found" condition, and is a choice vessel for the type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #594153
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This attractive piece is a Greek terracotta amphora that dates circa 1100-700 B.C., and is Sub-Mycenaean (Iron Age I & II). This light red terracotta is intact and has nice heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel. There are also spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outside surface and the inner surface has traces of root marking. This piece was probably used a table ware vessel and is approximately 4.6 inches high. A nice intact vessel with good eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1147979
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare to scarce piece is an Attic Greek beaker/mug that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 750-725 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.4 inches high, and is slightly larger than most recorded examples. This piece is also intact and has no repair/restoration, no overpaint, and no stress cracks that run within the vessel. The handle is completely intact, and this is rare for an early Attic Greek vessel of this type, as most examples have damage and/or repair to the handle or the area where the raised handle attaches to the body. This piece is also in its "as found" condition, with some very slight wear to one side, and there are spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the vessel which also mask some of the dark brown line design. This piece has dark brown cross hatched designs, with dots below, that run around the center of the vessel, and singular line design that runs up the length of the handle. This vessel is a light tan terracotta, and has a flat bottom with a slightly flared lip. This piece was also likely produced in Athens for the export market. This piece is very analogous in shape and size to the Heidi Vollmoeller Collection piece that was offered by Christie's Antiquities, South Kensington, London, Oct. 2003, lot no. 519. (See attachment.) There have been very few of these Attic Greek Geometric Period pieces on the market, and they are rare to scarce, especially in this intact condition. Ex: Private French collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1242856
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic black-glazed lekythos that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This piece is in mint condition, with no repair/restoration, and is approximately 3.25 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This piece is near gem quality, as the lustrous deep black glaze is nearly flawless, and the surface of this piece has an even deep black color with a thin multi-colored iridescent patina. This piece also has a beautiful esoteric design, with a gadrooned body with a pattern of incised grooves in the handle zone, and a small rouletted molding at the junction of the shoulder and the flared neck. This piece also has a small flat foot, and a black dotted circle underneath on the bottom. The overall design of this piece also has a geometric esthetic, as the height is equal to the diameter. The flared neck was also designed for greater control pouring the liquid that was held within, and this was likely a precious oil, and the short neck design also made pouring liquid from this vessel very precise as well. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2002, no. 243. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, approximately 3.5 inches high. See attached photo.) An additional analogous vessel was sold at Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2006, no. 134. ($2,500.00-$3,500.00 estimates, $3,750.00 realized.) This type of Greek Attic black-glaze ceramic is scarce in this exceptional condition, and is rarely seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1199056
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic oinochoe that dates circa early 5th century B.C. This charming little piece is approximately 5.5 inches high. This piece is an Attic blackware ceramic that has an incised designed theater mask in the form of a light red bearded man with a white diadem. This extremely rare example was also produced in the "Six's Technique", as seen with the red beard of the theatre mask with incised hair detail, and the face and diadem with white painted details. According to Joseph Noble in "The Techniques of Painted Attic Pottery", Watson-Guptill Pub., New York, 1965, p. 66: "SIX'S TECHNIQUE: Six's technique of East Greek origin, was usually employed on small vases such as lekythoi, phialai, skyphoi, and Nicosthenic amphorae. It made use of the added white, pink, and red. In this technique the picture was painted with a brush, applying the color to the surface of the vase which had been coated with the black glaze matter, and sometimes details or other figures were added by incision. The vase was then subjected to the usual Attic three-stage firing. This was an interesting technique; the pottery is attractive and has a spontaneous quality, but it is somewhat crude, lacking the refinement of the conventional black-figure or red-figure work." This Attic piece is extremely rare to rare with this type of "Six's technique" design, and in addition, incised theater masks of this type seen on Attic ceramics is not often seen on the market. This piece is also classified as "Type 5B", according to the "John D. Beazley Shape Chart", and is an extremely rare type which is only seen circa early 5th century B.C. This complete piece is repaired from several fragments, and has only over paint where the pieces have come together, and overall, is an extremely fine example with a nice deep black glaze. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This superb little piece is an Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is superb to mint quality, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This superb to mint piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1248144
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful Greek Campanian pelike ceramic is attributed to the Laghetto Painter, and dates circa 350-340 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 6.25 inches high by 5 inches in diameter, and is in mint condition with no restoration/repair. This piece has some spotty white calcite deposits, and is in it's pristine "as found" condition. In addition, this piece has a multi-colored iridescent patina, that is seen over sections that have a deep black glaze. This piece has a draped and seated young woman on a spotted rock that is holding up a mirror in her right hand. She is also seen wearing a detailed brilliant white dotted necklace, and her exposed right breast is not often seen relative to Campanian type ceramics. The brilliant white necklace draws the eye to the exposed right breast, and vice-versa, and this convention of art is a mark of an accomplished painter. The face of the woman also has a very sweet and young beautiful portrait. The other side of this piece shows a nude standing Satyr that is seen holding a white fillet in the right hand, and a thyrsus on the left shoulder. The thyrsus is a long staff, surmounted with a fir-cone, and was carried by Dionysus and satyrs during the celebration of religious rites. The thyrsus also ends in a sharp point of a spear, and the ancient Greeks thought that a puncture from this staff would induce madness. The face of the well-defined muscular and nude Satyr is also a young portrait, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Campanian ceramics attributed to the Laghetto Painter are scarce to rare, and in addition, this type of piece is rare, as two-handled pelikes of this type were seldom produced in Campania. According to A.D. Trendall in "Red Figure Vases of South Italy and Sicily", Thames and Hudson, New York, 1989, p. 157: "However, in the last third of the century there is a strong wave of Apulian influence on both Campanian and Paestan, probably due to the arrival of migrant artists, and the xylophone and naiskos, hitherto confined to Apulian, appear in the west for the first time, though the typically Apulian volute-krater is not found in Campania, nor are the column-krater, loutrophoros, nestoris and rhyton, and the pelike is extremely rare". The Laghetto Painter also was active in Capua, and was a follower of the Cassandra Painter, and both of these painters are considered two of the best Campanian painters that produced very realistic looking scenes with attractive faces. Another parallel Greek Campanian ceramic attributed to the Circle of the Cassandra Painter that shows a running deer, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases II", Sept. 2010, no. 150. (This piece is approximately 5.4 inches high by 8.7 inches wide from handle to handle, as this piece is a "skyphos". $7,500.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The type of piece offered here, "pelike", is seldom seen on the market, along with it's mint condition, and great eye appeal. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, Augsburg, circa 1990's. Note: This piece has additional documentation that is available to the purchaser. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: