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X-Rare and Extremely Fine Greek Silver Drachm of Phillip III

X-Rare and Extremely Fine Greek Silver Drachm of Phillip III


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Ancient World: Greek: Pre AD 1000: Item # 1323767
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This extremely fine coin is a silver drachm that was minted shortly after the death of Alexander the Great circa 323 B.C. This coin was likely minted circa 323-310 B.C. in Colophon, or possibly Abydus, and the identifying mint mark is the Macedonian royal star burst symbol that is seen on the reverse, at the front of the seated Zeus. This coin is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF-), and is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 4.3 gms (Attic Weight Standard), and has a very light gray patina. The obverse features a bust of Herakles facing right, and is seen wearing a lion's skin headdress. The portrait seen here is also a very close likeness of Alexander the Great, and was likely intended to portray both Herakles and Alexander. The reverse features a seated Zeus, who is seen holding a standing eagle which was a messenger of the gods. The Macedonian star burst symbol is seen at the front of the seated Zeus, and the name (Philip) in Greek lettering is seen behind. The flan of this attractive piece is very large, and one can see the edge line of the die that runs around the outer edge of the obverse. The flan of this piece is larger than what one normally sees relative to this issue, and this coin also has perfect centering, along with extremely high relief on the obverse. The large flan size alone makes this coin a superb example, and is not often seen on the market. In addition, the seated Zeus does not have crossed legs and has an analogous design as the specimens attributed to Abydus show, and the Macedonian royal star is often seen on examples attributed to Colophon, according to Martin Price. References: This extremely rare coin has an example listed in Price, no. P113, and is listed as "minted circa 323-280 B.C.", and as "Uncertain of Western Asia Minor". It may also be that this rare issue may have been minted in Pergamon, shortly after the death of Alexander the Great, as this was the center of the so-called "Royalist" faction that supported the royal family after the death of Alexander. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: