Greek Roman egyptian near east precolumbian maya antiqutities Coins

Egyptian faience ushabti for Hori Grandson of Ramses II,

Egyptian faience ushabti for Hori Grandson of Ramses II,


browse these categories for related items...
Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Ancient World: Egyptian: Faience: Pre AD 1000: Item # 1289779
J. Bagot Arqueología - Ancient Art
View Seller Profile
c/ Consell de Cent 278, Bajos 1
08007 Barcelona, SPAIN
0034 93 140 53 26

Guest Book
 $5,300.00 
TITLE: Ushabti for Hori CULTURE: Ancient Egypt PERIOD:New Kingdom, Dynasty XIX, Reign of Ramesses II, 1279 - 1213 a.C. MATERIAL: Faience DIMENSIONS: Height 14 cm. REF: 2014874 PRICE: 4,800 Euros. PROVENANCE: Private collection of Dr. L. Benguerel Godó, Barcelona, Acquired in London in the 1960s. PUBLICATIONS: EXHIBITIONS: CONDITION: Intact. DESCRIPTION: This ushabti figurine is depicted as a labourer, as he is holding two hoes to cultivate the fields of Osiris in the afterlife. He is wearing a short wig with a lock of hair falling on the right side. He also has a curled Osiris-style beard ending in a closed outward curl. Only his hands protrude from his mummyform shroud which covers all the body. These are crossed on his chest and are holding the agricultural implements already mentioned. The body is inscribed with a vertical column of hieroglyphs. This reads: “Glorified be the Osiris, Hori, justified”. Hori was the SeM-Priest of Ptah at th end of the reign of Ramesses II. Hori substituted Neferronpet in this post. He was the son of the prince Khaemweset and so grandson of Ramesses II. Hori had a brother called Ramesses who had served as the Sem-Priest of Ptah. He followed in the footsteps of his father to become a priest. He also had a sister called Isetnofret, who probably married his uncle Merneptah, thus becoming queen. If this was so, Hori was both nephew as well as brother-in-law to the pharaoh Merneptah. Auguste Mariette found ushabti figurines of Khaemweset (son of Ramesses II) in the Serapeum at Saqqara, made of limestone, faience and estatite that are today conserved in the Louvre Museum. These ushabtis and those of other royal personages from the reign of Ramesses II, along with high priests of Ptah in Memphis, have some to light in the middle of the 19th Century and the beginning of the 20th and are conserved in private collections and in museums such as the Antikenmuseum in Basel, the Musées royaux d'art et d'histoire in Brussels, and the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in Leiden.