A SILVER DRACHM OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT IN 18K GOLD RING

A SILVER DRACHM OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT IN 18K GOLD RING


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Ancient World: Greek: Pre AD 1000: Item # 1297147

Please refer to our stock # R.47 when inquiring.
Biblical Artifacts
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at The Inbal Hotel, Liberty Bell Park, 3 Jabotinsky Street
P. O. Box 14646, Jerusalem 9114601, Israel
tel. 972 2 583 7606

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 $2,450.00 
Abydus Mint; c. 328-3 BCE

Obverse: Bust of Alexander III as Herakles wearing lion skin facing right.

Reverse: Zeus on backless throne facing left holding eagle in his right hand and a scepter in his left. Pegasus forepart in left field. Monogram below strut of throne. ALEXANDROU behind throne.

Coin in extremely fine condition set in 18K gold ring.

Weight: 18.2g; US Ring Size: 9.5

Worldwide Shipping and Certificate of Authenticity Included in Price.

Export Approval from the Israel Antiquities Authority.

Bibliography:

Price, 1505 var

Müller, 610

SNG Cop, 891

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Certainly the most famous of all Greeks, Alexander had conquered much of the Western world before he reached the age of 30. After toppling the Persian Empire and establishing his rule in most lands from Greece to the border of India, he died a young man, long before his ambitions were fulfilled. Afterward, his massive kingdom was carved up by his successors, the diadochi, who thus created several new kingdoms.

The principal silver coins of Alexander show on their obverse the bust of Alexander III as Herakles (Hercules) wearing the scalp of the Nemean lion, and on their reverse the seated figure of Zeus holding an eagle and a scepter. It is debatable whether the obverse of these coins depict Herakles himself or Alexander III in the guise of Herakles. Given Alexander's clear understanding of the importance of propaganda as well as a plethora of other examples in which he attempted to depict himself as the demigod the latter is extremely likely. Many were struck in Alexander’s time, but they were continued by his successors and the designs were copied at independent Greek mints for more than 250 years after his death. They were also imitated by Celts, Arabians and other non-Greek peoples.