A LILY OF JERUSALEM PRUTAH OF JOHN HYRCANUS IN SILVER AND GOLD PENDANT

A LILY OF JERUSALEM PRUTAH OF JOHN HYRCANUS IN SILVER AND GOLD PENDANT


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Ancient World: Holy Land: Coins: Pre AD 1000: Item # 1332142

Please refer to our stock # lilypen when inquiring.
Biblical Artifacts
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at The Inbal Hotel, Liberty Bell Park, 3 Jabotinsky Street
P. O. Box 14646, Jerusalem 9114601, Israel
tel. 972 2 583 7606

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 $900.00 
Jerusalem Mint; 132-130 BCE

Obverse: BAΣIΛLEΩΣ ANTIOXOY EYEPΓETOY "Of King Antiochus, benefactor". Inverted anchor, date below.

Reverse: Lily.

Coin in fine condition with natural Holy Land patina. Found in Jerusalem.

Weight: 4.1g; Diameter: 21 mm

Set in 18k gold and silver pendant handmade in Jerusalem.

Worldwide shipping, sterling silver chain, olive wood box and Certificate of Authenticity Included in Price.

Ships from Jerusalem, Israel.

Bibliography:

Hendin, 1131

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Often considered the first Jewish coin this piece of numismatic history represents the great ability John Hyrcanus possessed as a ruler and statesmen. Shortly after his rule began, Jerusalem was besieged by the Seleucid ruler Antiochus VII. Although he was unable to defeat Antiochus directly a peace accord was reached and tribute was paid to Antiochus thus saving countless lives. Despite being now essentially a vassal to the Seleucid king, Hyrcanus was able to mint his own coinage, the iconography of which should not be overlooked. While the obverse depicts a Seleucid anchor and a reference to Antiochus VII as benefactor it should be noted that no figurative images are found on his coins, something quite out of the ordinary for Seleucid coinage which normally depict an image of the king or a deity, but in keeping with Jewish custom. Additionally, the reverse depicts a lily which, according to Meshorer, “is based on the ornamentary use of this symbol in the Temple of Jerusalem.” The choice of this specific Jewish symbol is particularly ingenious as it would also be accepted by non-Jewish members of the population due to its Seleucid and Hellenistic precedents. Thus in this coin we see clearly a man who had great respect for his faith and his people while maintaining the the ability to understand the importance of diplomacy and pragmatism in his rule. It was this kind of leadership that led Josephus to comment about him “He was the only man to unite in his person three of the highest privileges: the supreme command of his nation, the high priesthood and the gift of prophesy.”