EIGHT BRONZE COINS OF ANTIOCHUS VIII

EIGHT BRONZE COINS OF ANTIOCHUS VIII


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Ancient World: Greek: Pre AD 1000: Item # 1334473

Please refer to our stock # antiVIII when inquiring.
Biblical Artifacts
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Reign of Antiochus VIII (125-96 BCE)

Type 1:

Akko-Ptolemais Mint; c. 125-121 BCE

Obverse: Jugate busts of the Dioscuri facing right.

Reverse: Cornucopia. ANTIOXEΩN TΩN ΠTOΛEMAIΔI

Weight: 1.65-3.89 g; Diameter: 13.1-16.5mm

Conditions: Good to Very Fine

Houghton, 810

Type 2:

Antioch Mint; c. 125-121 BCE

Obverse: Radiate bust of Antiochus VIII facing right.

Reverse: Owl standing on amphora. BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ KΛEOΠATΡAΣ KAI BAΣIΛEOΣ ANTIOXOΥ

Weight: 5.41-5.96 g; Diameter: 17.5-19.4 mm

Conditions: Very Good to Fine

SNG Spaer 2441

Type 3:

Antioch Mint; c. 121-114 BCE

Obverse: Radiate bust of Antiochus VIII facing right.

Reverse: Eagle on thunderbolt left. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ

Weight: 6.59 g; Diameter: 19mm

Condition: Fine

SNG Spaer 2501

Worldwide Shipping and Certificate of Authenticity Included in Price.

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Antiochus VIII was the son of Demetrios II Nikator and Cleopatra Thea. He was preceded to the throne by his brother, Seleucus V, also the son of Cleopatra and Demetrius. He rose to power in 125 BCE after the assassination of Seleucus V by his own mother. He ruled jointly with Cleopatra Thea until 121 BCE when she attempted to poison him, thus resulting in her death. He ruled the empire alone until 116 BCE when Antiochus IX returned and attempted to gain control. This ended in a tumultuous truce where the Seleucid territory was split between the two rulers. This was, however, not a peaceful sharing of the kingdom with many battles breaking out between the two throughout the intervening years. In 96 BCE Antiochus VIII died of natural causes and his son Seleucus VI succeeded him as ruler of the northern empire.