CLARKE and CLARKE Art + Artifacts
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19th C Moroccan Koummya

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Directory: Popular Collectibles: Militaria: Edged Weapons: Pre 1900: item # 1168899

Please refer to our stock # MI-2-PAA when inquiring.

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$795.00

19th C Moroccan Koummya
$695.00

The Koummya is a variant of the Jambiyya which Christopher Spring calls,"an essential element of the formal attire of every adult man in Arabia and Maghrib countries of North Africa". The Koummya encountered in today's collector market can vary in both age and quality, as well as differing due to being crafted for use for sale to the tourist market. Judging from both the unique ebony hilt as well as the clear wear resulting from age and use, our example was likely made in the second half of the 19th C for traditional wear and use. The ebony wood hilt, inlaid with metal and brass is both unique and attractive. The traditional peacock tail pommel is brass over laid with incise patterned silver on the facing side. The double ring suspension, brass scabbard is well constructed, incised with traditional patterns and lined with wood. The facing side of the scabbard is adorned with silver at the throat and double mid bands all of which are incised with the traditional patterns employed in the brass areas. The brass and silver are muted with the wear of age and use The well crafted, double edged steel blade is typically utilitarian, dark with age and only a few tiny pin hole rust pits. There is a bend at the bottom curve of the scabbard which can probably, with care, be straightened if desired. Unique and well crafted it is unquestionably an antique dagger made for wear and use. Overall 15.5" in scabbard, dagger 15", blade 9" Reference: George Cameron Stone: A Glossary of the Construction, Decoration and use of Arms and Armor, pgs 310-314. Christopher Spring: African Arms and Armor, pgs 24-26.


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