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Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone (25)

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Antique Czech Rings c 1920 - Mint from Old Stock

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1930   item# 1009810

Antique Czech Rings c 1920  - Mint from Old Stock
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GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you!  

The "Czecho" signature on these antique rings lets us date them precisely to the first years of the Czech Republic (established in 1918). The region was previously known as Bohemia, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until World War I ended, and Bohemian glass has been prized from medieval times. Jewelry-making was a natural outgrowth of that skill.

Here the faux-gems and prettily detailed metalwork live up to the area's reputation, and we're delighted to have an assortment of rings so old that show no wear at all. Their provenance is a Pennsylvania estate.

With regard to sizing, we usually state sizes as a range, because results from different types of measuring equipment can vary up to half a size -- as our fingers also do with the time of day and temperature.

Thus, the four rings that measure 5.25 on our sizing stick should work for sizes 5 through 5.5. Two of these are set with pretend sapphires and the other two with pretend rubies.

Another sapphire one, slightly lighter in color, measures about 4.25, which should fit sizes 4 to 4.5.

All five of those are shown on my ring finger.

Shown as pinky rings in the same picture are three with lighter blue stones. Of these, which measure about a size 3 (fitting 2.75 to 3.25), one is more like aquamarine than sapphire. In the picture, they all look somewhat aqua, but two are really bluer.

The separate image shows five more pinky rings that are quite tiny. I managed to get them on, because my hands are absurdly small, but these were likely meant for little girls. One of the four set with faux amethysts measures 1.5 on my sizing stick and the rest (plus a fifth set with dark emerald green) are about a size 1.

Obviously, the rings look great stacked, so you may want several. If you're interested in a group, please e-mail and we'll work out special pricing. Also, please e-mail to see more photos or confirm availability of the ring(s) you prefer.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping (with an equivalent discount for international delivery) and gift-wrap is always free on request. Thanks for looking!



Spectacular Domed Antique Ring in Suffragette Colors

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1930   item# 999150

Spectacular Domed Antique Ring in Suffragette Colors
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GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you! 

As you know if you collect Suffragette jewelry, affordable rings are very, very rare. In the past, we've had only one and it sold the same day it was posted. Compared to brooches, necklaces and bracelets, few rings were ever made and most were custom creations featuring gold and genuine gems.

This unusual example -- done in gilt brass with pretend jade, pearls, amethysts and peridots -- is also remarkable for its size: a massive 1.5 inch tall and an inch wide. Nobody could miss seeing it, when the owner wore it on a march or to a meeting!

Because the jewels weren't used on a daily basis, but typically appeared only on special occasions, they tend to survive in great condition. Apart from slight wear to the metalwork and pearl finish, which requires magnification to notice, the only flaw I see here is that the shank isn't original. At some point, probably long ago, this adjustable band was added -- which is, of course, a convenience for us today. The metal isn't a match, but that doesn't detract, since it's completely obscured by the large face of the ring. Provenance is a California estate and dating would be circa 1900-1920.

This quirky color combination held deep meaning among 19th century and early 20th century feminists, for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. It seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

Tucked away and forgotten for decades, Suffragette jewelry began rapidly gaining value when the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" debuted in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings) before all women achieved in the vote in the US in 1920 and the UK in 1928. We try our best to maintain a good selection of pieces, but demand keeps growing. At present, we have several necklaces, brooches and earring sets in stock -- plus TWO costume rings, which is really a marvel. If you've been searching for a ring, have a look at both to see which suits you better.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping (with an equivalent discount on international delivery) and gift-wrap is always free on request. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!



Remarkable Domed Antique Ring in Suffragette Colors

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1930   item# 938646

Remarkable Domed Antique Ring in Suffragette Colors
 click for details

GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you! 

As you know if you collect Suffragette jewelry, rings are the holy grail. Of the few made, most are very fine and priced accordingly. An example with faux gems is a rare find, especially one this impressive in size.

Its condition is wonderful, too, but that isn't so unusual. Because Suffragette jewels of all types were worn typically for meetings and marches, not on an everyday basis, they've often survived looking nearly new, assuming careful storage.

This ring is just about flawless. Only under extremely high magnification can any surface wear be noted on its stones, even the glass pearls, or on high points of the gilded surface -- a ruffly round of heart-shaped scrollwork crowned by a richly colored dome of pretend emeralds, pearls and amethyst.

Slightly more than inch in diameter, this is a jewel that can't be overlooked, and its shank is adjustable to fit any finger. The Art Nouveau styling would lead me to call it Victorian -- and it may be -- but the sensational condition suggests a more conservative circa 1920 dating. As you know, American women attained the vote in 1920, but it took until 1928 for all women in England to be included. Probable origin is Czech (or Bohemian, if made before WWI dissolved the old Austro-Hungarian Empire). The ring reached us from a Midwestern estate.

The unusual color combination held deep meaning among 19th century and early 20th century feminists, for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

Tucked away and forgotten for decades, Suffragette jewelry began rapidly gaining value when the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings). We try our best to maintain a good selection, but demand keeps growing. At present, we have several necklaces, brooches and earring sets in stock, but we've never had the opportunity to offer a costume ring before. If it strikes your fancy, you'd better not delay.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping and gift wrap is always free when desired. Thanks for looking!



Antique Art Nouveau Suffragette Dangle Earrings

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1920   item# 935281

Antique Art Nouveau Suffragette Dangle Earrings
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GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you! 

Dating from the very early 20th century, these spectacular antique earrings make their feminist statement in a pretty, flirty way -- with a profusion of Art Nouveau details, loads of jewels and a graceful form that sets the drops dancing as you move.

Both the surmounts and the drops are highly dimensional, Adorning them are two huge cabochons of art glass (or possibly Galalith) jade, four sparkling amethyst pastes and four faux pearls. They measure about 2.25 inches long and .75 inch wide

As you know, the unusual combination of green, purple and white typically signifies that a jewel was first owned by a member of the Suffragette movement. For them, green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any. To the Suffragettes' efforts through many decades in the U.K. and U.S., we modern women owe our right to vote. That right was finally extended to all American women in 1920 and to all in Great Britain in 1928. Thus, although most of the jewelry is Victorian, Edwardian or transitional, some was crafted in the Art Deco era. Forgotten for many years, these jewels have been rapidly gaining value since the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings). Wearing Suffragette jewels is a great way to show your pride and appreciation and, now that the genre has been rediscovered, they're getting much harder to find.

These earrings, which reached us from a estate in the Carolinas, probably originated in Europe, quite possibly France. They're quite substantial piece and in lovely condition. A little age-appropriate surface wear can be noted on the reverse, but the front shows only the patina of time and all stones appear original. Based on the ornate screw-type fasteners, most likely dating is circa 1910 - 1920, although they could be a little earlier or later.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!



Fascinating German Art Deco Brooch and Earrings Set

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1930   item# 720774

Fascinating German Art Deco Brooch and Earrings Set
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GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you! $160. 

Here's a truly exciting antique demi-parure from "Cabaret"-era Germany. There's something marvelously wicked about roses in the colors of midnight moonlight, each holding a brilliant rhinestone dewdrop -- and there's something quite magical about the fact that they weigh no more than a breeze. They're of aluminum enameled in matte black, and the ornately stamped petal edges glitter with mock-marcasites.

This spectacular, highly dimensional set is a triumph of doing much with little, and you'll remember that extremely hard times befell Germany after World War I, due to the savage terms of the Versailles Treaty (which unfortunately contributed to Hitler's rise). Obviously, not much jewelry was made there in the Deco era -- or even in later Retro times, when materials were devoted to another war effort. Their rarity makes these pieces all the more special -- and there's extra poignance in the fact that they seem to have been worn very little, if at all, suggesting that the original owner didn't survive the next war (or at least had to leave them behind in the chaos). That they're marked "Made in Germany" means they can't possibly be post-WWII, when the country was divided into East and West, nor did Germany export to English-speaking markets after war broke out, so common sense and the Deco styling tie the set firmly to the 1920s or early 1930s.

Somehow it reached an estate in the Upper Midwest and from there came to us. The brooch is about 2 inches round and the earrings are about 1.25 inches round. Condition, as you see, is pristine. I love how perfectly these jewels evoke a brief but momentous period of European history and hope you will, too!

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!



1920s Art Deco Jeweled Suffragette Earrings

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1930   item# 706912

1920s Art Deco Jeweled Suffragette Earrings
 click for details

GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you! $135. 

When green, violet and white appear together on historic jewelry, this unusual color combination typically signifies that the piece was first owned by a member of the Suffragette movement -- for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was well understood by everyone in the days when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

To the Suffragettes' efforts through many decades in the U.K. and U.S., we modern women owe our right to vote. That right was finally extended to all American women in 1920 and to all in Great Britain in 1928. Thus, although most of the jewelry is Victorian, Edwardian or transitional, some dates from the Art Deco era.

These spectacular earrings were among the last examples, dating from the 1920s. By American 75-year standards, they're already antique, not just vintage. Richly embellished with faux pearls, amethysts and beautifully marbled jade(probably Czech), the earrings are highly dimensional and of excellent quality, with a nice heft. Each measures about 1 inch by 1 1/4 inches. The gilt metal features lattice-like detail and cutwork and its color is prettily patinated by age, not brassy. Based on dating, they were most likely made in England (although they could be American, produced in celebration of the Suffragettes' recent triumph here). Condition of the earrings is lovely and the original screw backs are present. Interestingly, we had this same design once before, but with lavender jades as the central stones and accents of emerald and pearl. It's beautiful, either way.

Suffragette jewelry has been rapidly gaining value since the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what those gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings). Wearing Suffragette jewels is a great way to show your pride and appreciation and, now that the genre has been rediscovered, they're getting much harder to find. These reached us from an East Coast estate.

Thanks for looking!



Spectacular Antique Gilt Bronze Suffragette Bracelet

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1920   item# 699147

Spectacular Antique Gilt Bronze Suffragette Bracelet
 click for details

GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you! 

When green, violet and white appear together on historic jewelry, this unusual color combination typically signifies that the piece was first owned by a member of the Suffragette movement -- for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were conveyed by the flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

To the Suffragettes' efforts through many decades in the U.K. and U.S., we modern women owe our right to vote. That right was finally extended to all American women in 1920 and to all in Great Britain in 1928. Thus, although most of the jewelry is Victorian, Edwardian or transitional, some dates from the Art Deco era.

In the case of this bracelet, we have to rule out Edwardian times, because it's so substantial: weighing about 50 grams. Edwardian jewels tended to be delicate and airy, as you know, and they often featured white metals. Thus, it must be Victorian or post-World War I. The design is certainly Art Nouveau, being loaded with curves and scrollwork, and the four domed plaques are joined by fold-over links that are typically 19th century (narrower than the classic bookchain, but basically the same idea). It's impossible to tell for certain whether it dates from the 1890s or a couple of decades later, during the first Victorian Revival period. Either way, it's antique by American 75-year standards. I see nothing that can be called damage -- only age-appropriate surface wear visible under high magnification and, on the reverse, some residue of old glue yellowed with time. Any good jeweler could remove that in a twinkling, if it bothers you, and could also safely polish up the metalwork if you want a brighter look.

From a Florida estate, this beauty measures about 7 inches long, 1.5 inches wide and more than .25 an inch thick. In addition to the 4 big cabochons of faux jade (very beautifully marbled), there are 8 faceted amethyst pastes and 8 faux pearls. The jades are most likely Bohemian (or Czech, if fashioned after WWI), but the amethysts and pearls could be French and I'm inclined to think the setting is French, since working with gilt bronze has been a specialty there for centuries.

Suffragette jewelry has steadily risen in price since the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings). Wearing Suffragette jewels is a great way to show your pride and appreciation and, now that the genre has been rediscovered, they have serious investment value, too.

There's no charge for insured U.S. Priority shipping and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail erinharris@comcast.net to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!



Spectacular Antique Suffragette Bracelet

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1920   item# 696685

Spectacular Antique Suffragette Bracelet
 click for details

GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you!

(Free U.S. Priority Shipping
& Gift-Wrap if Desired) 

When green, violet and white appear together on historic jewelry, this unusual color combination typically signifies that the piece was first owned by a member of the Suffragette movement -- for whom green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any.

To the Suffragettes' efforts through many decades in the U.K. and U.S., we modern women owe our right to vote. That right was finally extended to all American women in 1920 and to all in Great Britain in 1928. Thus, although most of the jewelry is Victorian, Edwardian or transitional, some dates from the Art Deco era.

In the case of this bracelet, we have to rule out Edwardian times, because it's so substantial: weighing more than 55 grams. Edwardian jewels tended to be delicate and airy, as you know, and they often featured white metals. Thus, it must be Victorian or post-World War I. The design is certainly Art Nouveau, being loaded with curves and scrollwork, and the four domed plaques are joined by engraved bookchain links that are typically 19th century. The only thing that argues for a later dating is its amazing condition. The gilding remains bright, the gorgeous stones are in great shape and the only signs of wear evident without high magnification are on the links, which seem to be of softer gilt brass rather than gilt bronze. Heavy wear is unusual on Suffragette jewelry, though, since most people wore it only occasionally and tucked it away after the vote was gained. Of course the bracelet is now an antique, by American 75-year standards, whether made in the 1890s or a couple of decades later.

From an estate in the Pacific Northwest, it measures about 7.5 inches long, 1.25 inches wide and more than half an inch tall. The layered construction and very large green stones make it highly dimensional. In addition to the 8 big crescents of faux jade (very beautifully marbled), there are 8 faceted amethyst pastes and 4 faux pearls. All appear original. The jades are most likely Bohemian (or Czech, if fashioned after WWI), but the amethysts and pearls could be French and I'm inclined to think the setting is French, since working with gilt bronze has been a specialty there for centuries.

Suffragette jewelry has steadily risen in price since the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings). Wearing Suffragette jewels is a great way to show your pride and appreciation and, now that the genre has been rediscovered, they have serious investment value, too.

There's no charge for insured U.S. Priority shipping and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!



Antique Art Nouveau Suffragette Lavaliere Necklace

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1920   item# 696564

Antique Art Nouveau Suffragette Lavaliere Necklace
 click for details

GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you! 

This antique Suffragette necklace is a charmer, styled with an elaborate, oversized surmount and a surprising drop, unexpectedly short, that whimsically suggests a watch fob.

The necklace is jeweled with pretend-jade of beautifully marbled early plastic (probably Galalith, invented in the 1890s) plus amethyst pastes and faux pearls, but the gilt metalwork is the real star here. It's highly dimensional with flower petals, some also suggesting shells. The airy openwork and gracefully articulated construction argue for an Edwardian dating, although it could have been crafted a little earlier or later. The surmount and drop measure about 2 3/8 inches, to which the chain and filigree clasp add about 15 inches. Even the chain is extraordinarily well detailed with bright-cut patterns and beaded edges. This is a very supple chain that's a joy to touch.

My best guess on origin is France, based on the sophisticated wit of the design, the quieter sparkle of the stones compared to those made in Bohemia and the heft of the metal. I expect there's bronze under this gilding, not brass, and the French have always known their way around gilt bronze. Condition, as you see, is superb, showing only slight surface wear on high points under extreme magnification, and provenance is a West Coast estate.

As you know if you collect Suffragette jewelry, the unusual combination of green, purple and white had deep meaning for early feminists. For them, green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. All this seems cryptic now, but was clearly understood by everyone in an era when messages were also communicated by which flowers you sent, how you held your fan and which corner of a calling card you folded down, if any. The wealthiest suffragettes mixed amethysts and pearls or diamonds with green stones such as emeralds or peridots, but pretend gems were naturally favored by the majority.

Wearing Suffragette jewels is a great way to show our appreciation of those who won us the vote. That right was finally extended to all American women in 1920 and to all in Great Britain in 1928. Although forgotten for many years, these jewels have been steadily gaining value since the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings) and, now that the genre has been rediscovered, they're getting much harder to find. This is a jewel that offers significant investment potential, as well as exceptional beauty.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!



Gorgeous Antique Suffragette Brooch circa 1920

Catalogue: Archives: Estate Jewelry: Costume: Rhinestone: Pre 1920   item# 691577

Gorgeous Antique Suffragette Brooch circa 1920
 click for details

GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
505.205.1404


Sold; thank you!

(Free U.S. Priority Shipping
& Gift-Wrap if Desired) 

That this exquisite Suffragette brooch comes from a Rhode Island estate adds particular interest, since that state was a major jewelry production center in the early 20th century. Many of the most talented designers and artisans worked for companies located there, and no doubt also created jewels on the side. This brooch isn't marked, but obviously is by a master with access to excellent materials. The substantial weight of it will surprise you, as will the quality of the art glass and metalwork. Details incorporate Art Nouveau scrollwork plus Arts and Crafts influences seen in the cabochon cut and collet settings of the amethyst, emerald and baroque pearl. The richly textured reverse is beautiful, too.

The brooch is in such fabulous shape that you'd almost mistake it for new. However, great age is indicated by the findings. While an early safety clasp is present, the pinstem moves with that wonderful side-to-side wobble that says you've got a true antique. Around 1920 would be right for this hardware. Also arguing for that approximate dating is the size of the brooch. At three inches long, it's larger than earlier bar pins, evolving toward Art Deco boldness.

I expect the original owner acquired it very shortly before the vote was gained for all American women in 1920, or perhaps in celebration of the event, and then stored it away very carefully. There's really no other way to explain its virtually pristine condition. It takes serious searching with a loupe to find any signs of surface wear to the gilding or glass.

As you know if you collect jewelry of this type, the unusual color combination had deep meaning for early feminists. Green represented hope, purple signified dignity and white stood for purity. The language we associate with "regard" jewelry applied, too: The "G" of green, "W" of white and "V" of violet comprised an abbreviation for Give Women (the) Vote. Forgotten for decades, Suffragette jewelry has been rapidly gaining value since the movie "Iron Jawed Angels" appeared in 2004, revealing what the gals went through (including hunger strikes and beatings). Wearing Suffragette jewels is a great way to show your pride and appreciation and, now that the genre has been rediscovered, they're getting much harder to find. We try our best to keep a good selection, but demand keeps growing. If this strikes your fancy, you'd better not delay.

As always, we offer free insured U.S. shipping (or an equivalent discount for international customers). Gift-wrap is also free on request. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!


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