GlitzQueen Antique and Vintage Jewelry
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Silver : Pre Victorian : Pre 1800 item #1319453
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$295
Reduced from $345.
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When we had a brooch of this type a few years ago, I was bowled over by its massive size. Amazingly, here's one about TWICE as big and in even better shape. It measures well over 2 3/4 inches in diameter, with a dome rising more than 1 1/4 inches.

This fascinating form was developed in the Netherlands, where 18th century residents of Zeeland wore it as part of their regional costume. It retains the old T-hinge and open C clasp indicative of great age, as well as the extremely substantial pinstem we associate with Georgian times. The only departure from original condition is that the pinstem, which would have been extra-long, was at some point shortened (a good idea, since they're dangerous now that we don't wear corsets and other layers of heavy underclothing).

The metal is almost certainly 835 silver (the old Dutch sterling standard), although we haven't spotted a mark. Given the fragility of the material, it's truly remarkable that even the repousse beads show almost no dimpling.

This is a truly spectacular conversation-piece item of a sort seldom seen outside Europe and it isn't as heavy to wear as you'd think, because there's so much openwork. It reached us from the estate of a New Yorker who lived past 90. The brooch would have been antique, of course, long before she purchased or inherited it.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping and beautiful gift wrap is also free on request. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Silver : Pre Victorian : Pre 1837 VR item #1007883
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$195
reduced from $255.
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Extremely well-crafted diminutive lockets were a feature of Regency (Late Georgian) fashion, as were enamelwork, neo-classical patterns and plumes. All these design currents combine here, where a finely enameled Greek Key border surrounds an engraved peacock feather and eye motif at center. (The peacock was not only fashionable on headgear then, but also a symbol of eternal life.)

A very early dating is further indicated by the plain window of beveled crystal on the reverse, through which we glimpse black fabric or very tightly woven hair held by a gilt retaining band of rope-twist design. I see no way to open this without popping up the glass (which seems to have incurred a teensy chip from exactly that process). Later lockets, as we know, have separate metal compartments that open to view enclosures. From later examples, we'd also expect hallmarks on any piece that required so much intricate craftsmanship, whereas there's no stamp of any sort on this silver. It looks like sterling, but may be a somewhat lesser European grade. An interesting mystery is the presence of a small incised line on the front that isn't part of the design, but looks intentional. Perhaps it was meant as a mark of grief, detracting from perfection. Occasionally I get vibes off a piece of jewelry and this one is loaded with heart-felt emotion. I feel it was first worn as a memorial jewel either by the person who made it or someone else of the same family.

Measuring a dainty 1 inch by 1/2 inch, this rare beauty is in splendid condition, relative to age, and its provenance is a Florida estate. It was probably meant to be on a ribbon slide tied at choker length and would look lovely on a black silk ribbon or cord. It comes with this dainty vintage chain, silver in color but unmarked.

There's no charge for insured U.S. shipping and gift-wrap is always free when desired. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Silver : Pre Victorian : Pre 1837 VR item #997626
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$185

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Truly a remarkable piece of history, this pre-Victorian brooch features the crowned eagle associated with Poland and its royals for more than a thousand years. The bird's stylized form is most like the versions favored by medieval monarchs Przemyslaus II and Wladyslaw Lokietek for their coins and coats of arms.

Certain details of its fabrication let us date the jewel very precisely to the period when a wave of patriotic nationalism swept through Europe -- redrawing imperial maps in some cases, although the 1830 uprising in Poland failed.

To compare this with our dated William IV coronation pin from England, type 1830 in the search box; you'll find the fastening hardware is identical -- same old T-hinge, ovoid C clasp and thick, elongated pinstem.

Most likely made for and prized by someone who participated in the uprising, the brooch measures 1 5/8" high and 1 1/4" wide and bears now-indiscernible silver marks on the clasp. It will be a splendid conversation piece for anyone of Polish heritage, and can be worn equally well by a man or a woman.

There's no charge for U.S.shipping, with an equivalent discount for on international delivery, and gift-wrap is always free on request. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Silver : Pre Victorian : Pre 1837 VR item #691596
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
$175

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So your ancestors weren't on the royal guest list in 1830? Well, it's still not too late to "inherit" this extraordinary antique enameled silver pin.

Given the high quality of the jewel, it was most likely produced in a very small quantity for the new monarch's guests at some special event marking his succession. I've seen none like it before and don't expect to see another.

As 1830 was the year when King George IV died and his brother William IV succeeded him, it's certainly a commemorative jewel. Adding to its rarity is the fact that the actual coronation didn't take place until almost a year later in September of 1931, which is the date seen on the usual souvenirs available to the public: medals, tankards, plates, jugs and such

This brooch has further historic interest as a gorgeous example of the enameler's art -- which faded with advances in gem-cutting. Ornately enameled settings were essential to important jewelry, until more brilliantly faceted stones could command attention on their own. Here see a wide array of enamel colors -- royal blue, golden yellow, orange and green -- which required a great deal of expertise to combine. All remain vivid and losses are slight. The brooch was obviously prized and well cared for. We obtained it from an estate in England, naturally enough.

Measuring almost 1 1/4" (3.17 cm) round, it has the open C clasp, T hinge and sturdy elongated pinstem one expects in a piece of such antiquity. It would be splendid lapel accent and conversation piece for any collector, whether man or woman.

There's no charge for insured U.S. Priority shipping (with an equivalent discount for on international delivery). Beautiful gift wrap is also free on request. Please e-mail to confirm availability, order or request more photos. Thanks for looking!
All Items : Estate Jewelry : Silver : Pre Victorian : Pre 1837 VR item #154040
GlitzQueen History and Art to Wear
On Hold
Since the time of Edward I, who reigned from 1272 to 1307, English monarchs have observed Maundy (or Maunday) Thursday - the day before Good Friday - by distributing specially struck fine silver coins (Maundy Money) and other gifts to the "Deserving Poor" in a major cathedral service. The term "Maundy" derives, like "mandatory," from the Latin "mandatum" - meaning command. It refers to the commandment, "Love one another," expressed by Jesus at the Last Supper when he washed disciples' feet. According to my research, James II (1685-1688) was the last monarch who actually did that, too.

Our array of these coins - drilled long ago for wear as charms or pendants - includes four Georgian examples, three from the reign of George III and one from that of George IV. All are threepence: two from 1762 (sold), one from 1763 (sold) and one from 1823. The monarch's portrait appears on the front of each and, on reverse, the denomination is represented in the style still current, with the number shown beneath a crown.

The number of Maundy Money sets produced each year varied with the monarch's age. For instance, George IV was 60 at Easter in 1823, so he honored 60 worthy recipients - each receiving 4 coins, 1 of every denomination from one penny to four. Thus, besides ours, there are only 59 more 1823 Maundy threepence coins anywhere in existence.

These Georgian coins are estate items discovered during a house clearance in northern England - also the source of our 8 James II and 12 Victorian Maundy Money coins.