Griffin Gallery Antiquities

14K Gold Victorian Mourning, Cameo Ring

browse these categories for related items...
Directory: Estate Jewelry: Gold: Victorian: Pre 1900: Item # 1058493

Please refer to our stock # 1690 when inquiring.
Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
View Seller Profile
5501 North Federal Hwy., #4
Boca Raton, FL 33487
tel 561-994-0811

Guest Book

19th Century 14K Gold Victorian Mourning, Cameo Ring with Head of a Male. Carved on hard stone with gentleman in profile with curly hair and beard. England, ca. 1880. In excellent condition. Sir Wallis Budge alleged that the noun "Cameo" apparently comes from Kame'o, a word used in kabbalistic slang to signify a "magical square", i. e. a kind of talisman whereupon magical spells was carved. In Britain, this revival first occurred during King George III's reign, and his granddaughter, Queen Victoria, was a major proponent of the cameo trend, to the extent that they would become mass-produced by the second half of the 19th century. According to Collector's Weekly, Mourning jewelry has been around since at least the 16th century, but it is widely associated with the Victorian Era, when mass production made it affordable. The trend reached its high point after the death of Prince Albert in 1861, when Queen Victoria, as well as members of her court, wore black clothing and matching mourning jewelry for decades. Thanks to this royal example, black jewelry became quite fashionable. The best pieces were made out of jet, a fossilized coal found near Whitby, England.