Oil Paintings, American and European, by King Art
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Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American (134)

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Cock of the Rock: Robert Havell, Jr

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1900   item# 1159061 (stock# 2578)

Cock of the Rock: Robert Havell, Jr
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King Art
414-276-6779


"$4500" 

Robert Havell Jr the younger 1793-1878, Tarrytown, NY


Red Houses on the River: Oscar Bluemner

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1940   item# 1159035 (stock# 2571)

Red Houses on the River: Oscar Bluemner
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King Art
414-276-6779


"$ 50,000 " 

Oscar Florianes Bluemner (1867-1938), . The painting is 7 x 10 inches. The medium is watercolor and pencil. Provenance: The Estate of Oscar Bluemner's widow, sold to Virginia collector and then to a collector in New Jersey. Art & Antique Gallery, Inc., Worcester, MA. It may have been a preliminary painting for a larger painting titled: "Play of Barns-Red" exhibited at the Owen Gallery in 2001. (size 28 x 30 inches). I spoke with Mr. Owen about this painting to get details. The two titles are as follows: "Play of Barns-Red" (Owen Gallery) tempera on panel (Owens Exhibition 2001) next the study for the painting titled: "Red Houses on the River"


A Scene From Nature with Figure: John Frederick Kensett

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1900   item# 1144419 (stock# 2576)

A Scene From Nature with Figure: John Frederick Kensett
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King Art
414-276-6779


Price on Request 

John Frederick Kensett, 1816-1872, Conn, Long Island, NY. This equisite painting is a fine example of an early Kensett painting. It is oil on canvas, signed indistinctly lower right and signed verso, A Scene from Nature by Kensett, New York, 1844. It is 12 1/8" by 10" unframed. It comes after Kensett was influenced by the French Barbizon School of painting. Son of an English immigrant engraver, John Kensett lacked enthusiasm for that medium and became one of the most accomplished painters of the second generation of Hudson River School painters. His reputation is for Luminism, careful depiction of light, weather, and atmosphere as they affect color and texture of natural forms. He was particularly influenced by the painting of Asher Durand in that he focused on realism and detail rather than the highly dramatic views associated with Thomas Cole. Going to the western United States in the mid 1850s and the 1860s, he was the first of the Hudson River School painters to explore and paint the West. Kensett was born and raised in Cheshire, Connecticut, and learned his engraving from his father, Thomas Kensett with whom he worked in New Haven, Connecticut until 1829. He continued working until 1840 as an engraver of labels, banknotes and maps and was employed part of that time by the American Bank Note Company in New York City. There he met Thomas Rossiter, John Casilear, and other artists who urged him to pursue painting. In 1840, he and Rossiter, Asher Durand, and Casilear went to Europe where Kensett stayed for seven years and supported himself by doing engraving but became accomplished in landscape painting. Having sent canvases of Italian landscapes back to New York, he had a reputation for skillful painting that preceded him. When he returned to New York City in 1847, he was an "instant success" and very sought after by collectors. Two of his Italian landscapes had already been purchased by the American Art Union. By 1849, he was a full member of the National Academy of Design and was generally popular among his peers. His studio was a gathering place with travelers stopping by to see his canvases and to identify "precise locations in the Catskills or Newport or New England in the oil sketches and drawings that covered his walls." (Zellman 170). For the women, he was a popular bachelor, "romantic looking with high forehead and sensitive expression." (Samuels 262) He was also sought after by many organizations. Among his activities were serving on the committee to oversee the decoration of the United States Capitol in Washington DC, and becoming one of the founders of the Metropolitan Museum in New York. An inveterate traveler, Kensett spent summers on painting excursions away from New York City. One of these trips was a special painting excursion with fifteen other artists sponsored by the B & O Railroad from Baltimore, Maryland to Wheeling, West Virginia. Unlike many of the Hudson River painters, Kensett painted coastal views, a subject he began pursuing in the 1850s. It was a subject that lent itself to his skill in depicting heightened light, color and reflection. Beginning 1854, he traveled in the West, first going up the Mississippi River and then the Missouri River in 1857, to Colorado with Worthington Whittredge in 1866, and in 1870 back to Colorado with Whittredge and Sanford Gifford. He died two years later attempting to rescue the drowning wife of fellow artist Vincent Colyer.


Red-Shouldered Hawk: John James Audubon

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1837 VR   item# 1141575 (stock# 2574)

Red-Shouldered Hawk: John James Audubon
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King Art
414-276-6779


"Price on Request" 

John James Audubon, 1785-1851, Haiti, New York. Oil on Canvas, laid down on masonite, 39 1/4"h by 26 1/4"w. It has excellent provenance direct from the artist in 1840 and through direct descent to present owner. John James Audubon's entire career was devoted to preserving images of rapidly declining species of birds and wild animals in watercolor and oil. Audubon was born in Santa Domingo (now Haiti) to a French naval officer and his Creole mistress. He was raised in France during the French Revolution. In 1803, Audubon fled with his father to the United States because Napoleon was seeking soldiers for his army. Although he studied with Jacques-Louis David (France) and John Stein in Natchez, Mississippi, Audubon was largely self-taught as an artist and a scientist. Audubon soon became enthralled with every bird in North America, and he traveled extensively up and down the Ohio and Mississippi River basins and as far south as the Florida Keys to study birds and to produce watercolors in preparation for The Birds of America. From 1819-1839, the ornithologist Audubon catalogued as many species as he could and his notes and paintings are represented in the now-famous John James Audubon: The Watercolors for the Birds of America.The artist, naturalist, explorer, publisher was also an entrepreneur, writer and an active, vocal environmentalist. He realistically and enthusiastically painted wildlife (especially birds) in flying or grounded positions with detailed accuracy and preserved in paint many now-extinct birds for future generations to study and observe. After 1826, Audubon went to Great Britain to raise subscription money and find engravers and publishers for Birds of America, published eventually from 1828-1838 with the help of Scottish engraver William Home Lizars (the early part of the series) and English engraver-publisher Robert Havell, Jr. From 1831-1832, Audubon returned to Florida to paint more birds. From 1845-1848, the series Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America was published and made the reputation of this naturalist.


Impressionist November Landscape: Hal Robinson

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1930   item# 1137790 (stock# 2569)

Impressionist November Landscape: Hal Robinson
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King Art
414-276-6779


SOLD 

Hal Robinson (1875-1933), NY and Connecticut. This lovely impressionist painting is oil on canvas, 7" by 9" and signed Hal Robinson lower right. Condition is excellent. Provenance: Private Midwestern Collection, Leslie Hindman Auction, Private Midwest Collection, Artist's Estate. Robinson painted at Old Lyme and exhibited After a Spring Rain, After the October Storm, The Last Glow, Saw Mill River and The Ice-Bound Hudson between 1909 and 1911 at the National Academy of Design. At the Corcoran Gallery he showed After a Spring Rain in 1910. In the following year he exhibited A Gray Day in November and The Ice Pond after a Thaw at the Carnegie International. Basically a naturalistic landscape painter, Robinson shows a degree of assimilation to impressionism in his use of violet hues and in the expressive application of impasto pigment. He obviously worked from a fully loaded brush that results in a textural impasto that is a delight in itself, yet there is no systematic use of broken color, as Childe Hassam practiced. Hassam’s arrival at Old Lyme in 1903, along with that of Willard Metcalf, changed the orientation of the artists’ colony almost completely from tonalism to impressionism. Robinson was obviously responding to those innovations. When Robinson died in 1933, the Lyme Art Association was undergoing financial problems. Florence Griswold would live until 1937, guiding visitors through her colonial house. But largely the Griswold Mansion had become a nostalgic curiosity. On the other hand, Old Lyme remained the choice of many landscape painters, and into the early 1960s, Will Howe Foote (1874-1965), William Chadwick (1879-1962), Guy Wiggins (1883-1962), and Harry Hoffman (1874-1966) were still exhibiting there.


Indian Papoose in Cradle: Grace Carpenter Hudson

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1930   item# 1137787 (stock# 2568)

Indian Papoose in Cradle: Grace Carpenter Hudson
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King Art
414-276-6779


SOLD 

Grace Carpenter HudsonBorn in Potter Valley near Ukiah, CA on Feb. 21, 1865- 1937. This heartrending portrait of Indian Papoose in cradle crying his or her heart out is typical of this painter of Native American children and babies. It is oil on fine silk laid on board, 14" by 14" and signed G Hudson lower left circa 1895-1905. It is in overall good condition with minor frame rubbiing on bottom left. This heartrending portrait of Indian Papoose in cradle crying his or her heart out is typical of this painter of Native American children and babies. Provenance: Private Midwestern Collection, Leslie Hindman Auction, Private Midwestern Collection by direct descent, Purchased from Artist.Grace Carpenter showed artistic promise at an early age. After attending public schools in Ukiah and San Francisco, at age 14 she enrolled at the local School of Design. For five school terms she studied there with Virgil Williams, Raymond Yelland, Domenico Tojetti, and Oscar Kunath. After her marriage to Dr. John Hudson in 1890, she returned to Ukiah. Their home at 431 South Main (now a museum) was marked with a totem pole in front and was known as "The Sun House." The Pomo Indians who lived in the area accepted Grace as one of them and called her "Painter Lady." After her painting of Little Mendocino (a crying Pomo baby) caused a sensation at the Chicago World's Fair in 1893, she then specialized in painting the Pomos. Most of her subjects were of the children and babies of the tribe, the older Pomos being superstitious about having their images recorded. Her oils chronicled the Pomo culture and are of great historical value. In addition to the Pomos she spent several months painting the native children of Hawaii in 1901 and a commission took her to Oklahoma to paint the Pawnees in 1904. Mrs. Hudson died at her Ukiah home on March 23, 1937 having left a great legacy to our national art. The monument marking her grave in Ukiah Cemetery is of her own design, a basalt shaft capped with a mourning phoenix. Exh: Calif. State Fair, 1879-1902; SFAA, 1892-1902; Kennedy-Rabjohn Gallery (SF), 1902 (solo); Schussler Gallery (SF), 1907; Del Monte Art Gallery (Monterey), 1907-10; Alaska-Yukon Expo (Seattle), 1909; Gould Gallery (LA), 1907; Kanst Gallery (LA), 1910. In: Oakland Museum; Field Museum (Chicago); CHS; Royal Gallery (London); NMAA; Orange Co. (CA) Museum; LACMA; MM. Source: Edan Hughes, "Artists in California, 1786-1940" The Painter Lady; Artists of the American West (Samuels); American Art Annual 1909; Women Artists of the American West; Artists of the American West (Samuels); Artists of the American West (Doris Dawdy); Calif. Hist. Society Quarterly, March 1958; Dictionnaire des Peintres, Sculpteurs, Dessinateurs, et Graveurs (Bénézit, E); California State Library (Sacramento); SF Chronicle, 3-24-1937 (obituary). Her paintings sell for up to $77,000.


Landscape: Red Haired Woman & Child: Claude Buck

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1950   item# 1130306 (stock# 2561)

Landscape: Red Haired Woman & Child: Claude Buck
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King Art
414-276-6779


sold 

Claude Charles Buck, Santa Cruz, California, 1890-1974. This stunning jewel is Claude Buck at his usual dreamy best. It is oil on board of a beautiful red haired mother and child in a landscape with a crescent moon and flowers. It is 9 1/2" H" by 7 3/8" W in the original American frame with overall dimensions of 15 1/2" H by 13 3/8" W. It is oil on board. Privat MidWest collection, Private East Coast Collection.His painting go for up to $25,000 and he is listed in Davenport and Who was Who in American Art.


Expansive River Landscape: Levi Wells Prentice

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1930   item# 1122686 (stock# 2559)

Expansive River Landscape: Levi Wells Prentice
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King Art
414-276-6779


"$50,000." 

Levi wells Prentice, American,born 1851, Harrisburgh, New York-1935, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This large oil on canvas is a beautiful example of his semi primitive landscapes. It is 24"h by 36"w and is in the original frame. It is signed and in good condition, has been restored and lined. He lived and was active in New York and Connecticut A self-taught artist Levi Wells Prentice is best known for his realistic still-life compositions of fruit arranged within a landscape, or abundantly spilling from bushel baskets. Early in his career, he painted portraits and landscapes of the Adirondack Mountain region of Lewis County, New York, where Prentice was born in 1851. Prentice later turned to painting still-life subjects when he moved to Brooklyn, New York in 1883. He was a member of the Brooklyn Art Association and frequently exhibited his paintings there. In addition to his artistic talents, Prentice also designed his own frames and made his own brushes and palettes. Prentice's fruit still lifes are compositions are intended to create dramatic contrasts. The shift between dark background areas and the vibrant hues of the fruit are done to give the compositions an exciting, visual energy. The fruit is presented with clarity and precision. An emphasis is placed on the idea of man vs. nature. The wooden baskets with hand wrought nails represents a structured, man-made object, while the overly ripe fruit represents the fleeting qualities of nature. These paintings also demonstrate Prentice’s remarkable skills at rendering color, form, and texture. Noted art historian, William H. Gerdts observed: “there are several works by Prentice in which he achieves a quality of illusionism which is unsurpassed.” (1) In 1993, the skillful 'illusionism' of Levi Wells Prentice was celebrated in a retrospective exhibition at the Adirondack Museum in New York. His works continue to receive a high degree of appreciation by collectors today. His works are represented in many museums including the New York State Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Montclair Art Museum, Philbrook Museum of Art and Yale University Art Gallery. His paintings sell for up to $150,000.


California Landscape with Mountains: Edgar A Payne

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1940   item# 1117281 (stock# 2554)

California Landscape with Mountains: Edgar A Payne
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King Art
414-276-6779


Price on Request 

Edgar Alwin Payne, Born Washburn, Missouri 1883- 1947 Hollywood,CA. This little oil on board is 15.5" by 25.5"H with framed dimensions of 20.5" by 31" and is signed lower right. Edgar Payne left home at age 14 and found work painting houses, stage sets, and signs. His travels took him through the Ozarks and into Mexico. Except for a brief period at the Art Institute of Chicago, he remained a self-taught artist. On his first visit to California in 1909, he spent several months painting in Laguna Beach before visiting San Francisco. While in San Francisco he met artist Elsie Palmer whom he married in Chicago in 1912. In 1917 he returned to Glendale, California with a commission from Chicago's Congress Hotel for a mural of 11,000 square yards of muslin which was accomplished with the help of other local artists and installed shortly thereafter. In 1918, the Paynes established a home and studio in Laguna Beach where he organized and became the first president of the local art association. He continued painting and exhibiting in Los Angeles and Laguna until 1922 when he and Elsie began a two-year painting tour of Europe. During the next eight years their winter residence was mainly in and around New York City. They traveled from coast to coast in the U.S. until 1932 when they returned to Hollywood and the following year separated. Payne is internationally famous for his canvases depicting Indians riding through desert canyons and landscapes of the Sierra Nevada. He produced a color motion picture called "Sierra Journey" and Payne Lake in the High Sierra is named for him. Memberships:Salmagundi Club (NYC); California Art Club (pres. 1926); Laguna Beach Art Association; Chicago Society of Artists; AAPL; Carmel Art Association Exhibitions:Palette & Chisel Club, 1913; California State Fairs, 1917, 1918 (medals); Ten Painters of Los Angeles, 1919; Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1919 (solo); Art Institute of Chicago, 1920 (prize); Southwest Museum (LA), 1921 (prize); Paris Salon, 1923; National Academy of Design, 1929 (prize); Golden Gate International Exposition, 1939; California Art Club, 1947 (prize). Collections:National Academy of Design, New Mexico Art Association; Art Institute of Chicago; Orange Co. (CA) Museum; Irvine (CA) Museum; Chicago Museum; Indianapolis Museum; Bancroft Library (UC Berkeley); Pasadena Art Inst.; Pasadena Museum; Southwest Museum (LA); Springville (UT) Museum; Fleischer Museum (Scottsdale); Oakland Museum. His painting sell at auction for up to $553,000.


Impressionist Trees in Bucks County: Edward Redfield

Catalogue: Fine Art: Paintings: Oil: N. America: American: Pre 1950   item# 1117154 (stock# 2552)

Impressionist Trees in Bucks County: Edward Redfield
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King Art
414-276-6779


HOLD 

Edward Redfield, 1865-1965, Pennsylvania. This lovely piece is 9"h by 12"w in a period frame 15 1/4"h by 18 1/4"w and is signed lower right. Condition is good. Redfield is regarded as the premier painter of the New Hope School of American Impressionism, and, in his time, was considered one of the best landscape painters in the country. He was born in 1869 in Bridgeville, Delaware, and moved to Center Bridge, near New Hope, Pennsylvania in 1898. His presence in Bucks County was enough to lure many younger artists to the region, making it an epicenter for the American Impressionist movement.Redfield attended the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts from 1885 to 1889, where he studied with Thomas Anshutz and Thomas Hovendon, and became close friends with Robert Henri. In 1889, he traveled to Paris to study in the ateliers of William Bouguereau and Tony Robert-Fleury at the Academie Julian. He then traveled around Europe until 1893, painting in France, Italy, and England. He exhibited extensively throughout the country and abroad, and won an impressive array of awards, including a Bronze Medal, Paris Exposition (1900); Bronze Medal, Pan-American Exposition (1901); Temple Medal (1903), Jennie Sesnan Gold Medal (1904), Gold Medal of Honor (1907), Lippincott Prize (1912), and Stotesbury Prize (1920), all from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Silver Medal (1904), St. Louis Exposition; Fischer Prize and Gold Medal (1907) and First W.A. Clark Prize and Gold Medal (1908) from the Corcoran Art Gallery, Washington, D.C.; Honorable Mention (1908) and Third Class Medal (1909), Paris Salon; Palmer Gold Medal (1913), Chicago Art Institute; Hors Concous Prize (1915), Panama-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco; Carnegie Prize (1918), Altman Prize (1919), amd Saltus Medal (1927), National Academy of Design.Redfield is best known for his exuberant spring and winter landscape scenes of the Bucks County region. His paintings are included in the most prominent museums and public collections throughout the country, such as the Boston Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Art Institute, the Carnegie Institute, the Chicago Art Institute, the Corcoran Gallery, the Los Angeles Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. His paintings sell for up to $434,500.

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