Antique Stones Japan
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1492 item #1331365 (stock #711)
Antique Stones Japan
Price on Request
Standing Amida Nyorai, the hands forming the raigo-in mudra welcoming the souls of the departed faithful to the Western Paradise, sculpted from Japanese cypress using yosegi-zukuri joined-block construction, the eyes of inset crystal, and the entirety finished in a black-lacquer and elaborately applied gilt, the lotus-form dais a later replacement. The missing mandorla notwithstanding, excellent condition, with virtually no wood loss.

Height, including lotus-form dais: 83 cm
Height of Amida figure only: 66 cm

An exquisitely sculpted, impressively scaled Amida Buddha with exceptional presence and in excellent condition. Nanbokucho/early-Muromachi Period ca. 1400, entirely refinished, apparently, ca. 1600.

Formerly property of the C. Philip Cardeiro Living Trust.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #1331219 (stock #710)
Antique Stones Japan
$1,000.00
Gorinto (five-tiered stupa) sculpted in one piece from a brick-hued granite. Muromachi Period ca. 1500. Very minor old loss.

Height: 40 cm
Width: 15.5 cm
Depth: 15.5 cm

The gorinto is a uniquely Japanese style of stupa comprising five geometric forms, which correspond (from bottom) to earth, water, fire, wind, and ethereal space. The Japanese Shingon sect of esoteric Buddhism views the gorinto as a symbol of Dai-Nichi Buddha, who, underlying all things, manifests himself in the five elements making up the physical world.

With a tapered bottom surface sculpted for easy insertion into the soil, this piece will require some form of vertical support if displayed indoors on a flat surface.

A notably handsome gorinto showing strong formal balance, significant age, and excellent condition.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #1331217 (stock #709)
Antique Stones Japan
SOLD.
Seated Jizo Bosatsu, the hands forming the gassho mudra of adoration, figurally sculpted from a brick-hued igneous stone. Mid-Edo Period ca. 1750. Very minor old loss. Variegated lichen accumulation.

Height: 25 cm
Width: 20 cm
Depth: 15 cm

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1492 item #1331066 (stock #708)
Antique Stones Japan
SOLD.
A standing guardian deva, most likely one of the four Heavenly Kings (Shitenno) who symbolically guard Buddhism in the four cardinal directions, sculpted in ichiboku-zukuri from a single piece of wood, probably kaya (Japanese nutmeg). Kamakura Period ca. 1300.

Height, including stand: 57 cm
Height of figure only: 51 cm
Stand: 22 cm square

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1330976 (stock #707)
Antique Stones Japan
$750.00
Standing Jizo Bosatsu, the hands holding a large hoju (sacred jewel), sculpted in relief from a gray-hued igneous stone. Late-Edo Period ca. 1825. Very minor old loss, with overall softening of the lines and contours.

Height: 23.5 cm
Width: 13 cm
Depth: 8 cm

A small-scale stone with outsize charm.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #1330622 (stock #706)
Antique Stones Japan
$3,400.00
Seated Jizo Bosatsu, the left hand holding a hoju (sacred jewel) and the right a shakujo (crozier), figurally sculpted from a large-grained sedimentary stone. Mid-Edo Period ca. 1725. Minor old loss, with softening of the lines and contours overall.

Height: 62 cm
Width: 47 cm
Depth: 30 cm

Sadogashima, an island in the Japan Sea off the coast of Niigata Prefecture, is famous for its production of a distinctive style of figurally sculpted stone Jizo. This monumentally scaled example shows unusually detailed sculpting. Highly collectible.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1330494 (stock #705)
Antique Stones Japan
$1,200.00
Stone hokora sculpted in two pieces from a brown-hued igneous stone. Mid-Edo Period ca. 1750. Minor old loss. Light lichen accumulation.

Overall height: 47 cm
Width of roof: 34 cm
Depth of roof: 28 cm

Originally employed as a symbolic dwelling for a given clan's ancestral deity, this hokora features an unusually high-pitched roof and a window in the shape of an upside-down heart, a traditional motif called inomemado (lit. boar's-eye window) used in Japan since at least the Heian Period (784—1185) primarily in Shinto- and Buddhist-related architectural applications.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #1330158 (stock #704)
Antique Stones Japan
SOLD.
Standing Fudo-Myo, the right hand wielding an upright ken (sword) and the left grasping a kensaku (rope), sculpted in relief against a flame-type mandorla from a fine-grained metamorphic stone. Taisho Era ca. 1920. Very minor old loss. Light lichen accumulation overall.

Height: 24 cm
Width: 15 cm
Depth: 9 cm

A charmingly fearsome little Fudo-Myo, stone depictions of which are uncommon.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #1330123 (stock #703)
Antique Stones Japan
$1,200.00
Three Jizo Bosatsu figures standing in a row, each with hands forming the gassho adoration mudra, sculpted in relief from a brown-hued igneous stone. Mid-Edo Period ca. 1700. Very minor old loss. Light lichen accumulation.

Height: 34 cm
Width: 34 cm
Depth: 15 cm

According to Buddhist belief, Jizo Bosatsu was entrusted by the historical Buddha with saving all sentient beings during the 5.76 billion years between the time of the historical Buddha's death and the arrival of Miroku, the Buddha of the future. The concept of six Jizo is rooted in the Buddhist idea that all sentient beings plod toward enlightenment through six realms of transmigratory existence, i.e., Hell, Hunger, Animality, Anger, Humanity, and Heaven. Responsible for safeguarding the passage of all beings through these six realms, Jizo is symbolically construed in six manifestations, one for each of the six realms.

The three most commonly encountered configurations of six-Jizo depictions are (1) six separate stones on each of which is sculpted a single Jizo figure, (2) a single stone on which are sculpted six Jizo figures, and (3) two separate stones on each of which are sculpted three Jizo figures, as in this example, which alone constitutes just one-half of a complete six-Jizo configuration.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #1330076 (stock #702)
Antique Stones Japan
$900.00
Seated female Buddhist deity, possibly Kichijoten a.k.a. Kisshoten, the right hand holding a hoju (sacred jewel) and the left hand forming the segan-in mudra symbolizing the fulfillment of the vow, sculpted figurally from a gray-hued igneous stone. Mid- to late-Edo Period ca. 1800. Very minor old loss.

Height: 29 cm
Width: 29 cm
Depth: 16.5 cm

Heavy-set and of gentle mien, a female Buddhist deity of uncertain identity.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #1329327 (stock #701)
Antique Stones Japan
$2,200.00
Six Jizo Bosatsu figures standing in a row, each with hands forming the gassho adoration mudra, sculpted in relief from tuff, an igneous stone composed primarily of volcanic ash. Early-Edo Period ca. 1650. Minor old loss and desirable softening of the lines and contours overall. Excellent lichen accumulation.

Height: 41 cm
Width: 41 cm
Depth: 17 cm

According to Buddhist belief, Jizo Bosatsu was entrusted by the historical Buddha with saving all sentient beings during the 5.76 billion years between the time of the Buddha's death and the arrival of Miroku, the Buddha of the future. The concept of six Jizo is rooted in the Buddhist idea that all sentient beings plod toward enlightenment through six realms of transmigratory existence, i.e., Hell, Hunger, Animality, Anger, Humanity, and Heaven. Responsible for safeguarding the passage of all beings through these six realms, Jizo is symbolically construed in six manifestations, one for each of the six realms.

The three most commonly encountered configurations of six-Jizo depictions are (1) six separate stones on each of which is sculpted a single Jizo figure, (2) two separate stones on each of which are sculpted three Jizo figures, and (3) a single stone on which are sculpted six Jizo figures, as in the example offered herein. This particular six-Jizo style, with the Jizo figures aligned neatly in a row underneath an overarching pediment, is most commonly encountered in the region centering on Yamanashi Prefecture, approximately 100 km due west of Tokyo.

A sizable six-Jizo stone redolent of time's passage.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #1329317 (stock #700)
Antique Stones Japan
$1,000.00
Seated Amida Buddha, the hands placed centrally on the lap in the Amida jo-in concentration mudra, sculpted in shallow relief from a light-brown igneous stone showing rust-brown patination above the line of soil insertion. Late-Muromachi/Momoyama Period ca. 1550. Very minor old loss.

Height: 33 cm
Width: 20.5 cm
Depth: 11 cm.

Sculpted with a tapered base for insertion directly into the ground, this stone requires a wall or other form of lateral support if displayed indoors. If placed outdoors, it can be inserted easily into the ground.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1837 VR item #1328942 (stock #699)
Antique Stones Japan
SOLD.
Stone Dosojin comprising two human figures standing side by side in a semi-embrace, sculpted in relief from tuff, an igneous stone composed largely of volcanic ash. Clearly dated on the side to the seventh year of the Tenpo Era (1836), late-Edo Period. Minor old loss. Excellent lichen accumulation.

Height: 43.5 cm
Width: 36 cm
Depth: 18 cm.

Dosojin is the Japanese Shinto manifestation of a Chinese Taoist deity believed to guard the border between this world and hell. Charged with obstructing the passage of evil spirits and gods of disease into human communities, Dosojin stones were traditionally placed on roadsides and mountain passes as well as at crossroads and village boundaries.

Early Dosojin examples typically feature either two Jizo Bosatsu figures--Dosojin's honjibutsu, or Buddhist counterpart, being Jizo Bosatsu--or, less often, two Amida Buddha figures standing or seated side by side. By the mid-Edo Period ca. 1725, Dosojin is most commonly depicted in the form of two figures, traditionally construed as a heterosexual couple, standing or seated side by side and typically displaying some form of physical affection. The piece on offer herein is a perfectly representative example of this more recent Dosojin style.

Talismanic as opposed to memorial in function, Dosojin stones have long been sought out by collectors in Japan and as a result are no longer readily available in the market. A highly collectible piece.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #1328554 (stock #698)
Antique Stones Japan
$3,800.00
Standing Shomen Kongo (lit., Blue-faced Vajrapani) sculpted in relief from a gray-hued igneous stone. Mid-Edo Period ca. 1700. Very minor old loss. Light lichen accumulation and remnants of dried moss.

Height: 48.5 cm
Width: 28.5 cm
Depth: 19 cm

In the Esoteric Buddhist tradition, Shomen Kongo is a fearsome deva believed to protect against disease. With six arms/hands holding various symbolic Esoteric attributes, three eyes of which one is vertical, a monkey-head crown piece, a skull necklace, and a fierce scowl upon his face, this is a classic depiction, with one remarkable exception: the round-headed pointy-eared critter poking out from beneath the garment at a point between and above the knees. While such a crotch-critter is neither accounted for in the literature nor typically observed on Shomen Kongo depictions, it is reasonable to assume that it was intended to function as a special amulet against venereal disease.

A thoroughly intriguing rarity with extraordinary presence. Highly collectible.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1492 item #1328455 (stock #697)
Antique Stones Japan
Price on Request
Fragment of a seated Buddha sculpted from kaya (Japanese nutmeg). Early-Kamakura Period ca. 1200.

Height: 47 cm
Width: 31 cm
Depth: 21.5 cm

Showing ichiboku-zukuri (single woodblock construction), elegant modeling, and a cherubic countenance of ingratiating diffidence, a sizable Kamakura-Period fragment with extraordinary presence. Highly collectible.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #1328300 (stock #696)
Antique Stones Japan
$2,200.00
Standing Seitaka Douji, one of Fudo-Myo's two child attendants, figurally sculpted from a gray-hued igneous stone. Clearly dated to the seventh year of the Kyoho Era (1722), mid-Edo Period. Loss of the attributes originally held in the hands; otherwise, very good condition, with only very minor old loss. Slight traces of polychrome.

Height: 47 cm
Width: 18 cm
Depth: 15 cm

A well-executed Seitaka Douji, stone examples of which are exceedingly uncommon, with an irrefutable mid-Edo Period manufacture date.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #1327573 (stock #695)
Antique Stones Japan
$900.00
Seated Jizo Bosatsu, the hands forming the gassho mudra of adoration, sculpted figurally with rough-hewn simplicity from a grayish igneous stone. Early- to mid-Edo Period ca. 1700, possibly earlier. Dark-soot patination, particularly of the head, lower portion of the front, and entirety of the back, testifying to centuries of devotional usage during which a bib-type garment was draped around the neck, thereby partially shielding the stone from the smoke of burning candles and incense.

Height: 13 cm
Width: 9.5 cm
Depth: 7 cm

An enchanting little Jizo stone.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #1327120 (stock #694)
Antique Stones Japan
Price on Request
Hokyointo stupa, sculpted in five parts from a brown-gray igneous stone. Clearly dated to the 10th year of the Kanei Era (1633), early-Edo Period. Very minor old loss, with an old line of repair running diagonally across the cylindrical uppermost part.

Height: 160 cm
Width of foundation: 40 cm
Depth: 40 cm.

The name of this distinctive style of Japanese stupa derives from the Hokyoin Darani sutra. The earliest hokyointo, dating to the Heian Period (792–1185), were made of wood or gilded bronze and functioned as repositories for copies of that eponymous sutra. From the Kamakura Period (1192–1333), hokyointo were made nearly exclusively of stone and employed as funerary markers, particularly of exalted personages. Accordingly, hokyointo are relatively uncommon and only rarely become available in the market.

This sizable, handsome example, all of a piece and in laudable condition even after the passage of nearly four centuries, is a recent deaccession from the Ashikaga Museum of Art in Ashikaga City, Tochigi Prefecture, Japan.