Pater Gratia Oriental Art

Chinese Export Porcelain Beaker, Kangxi, hatching lines

Chinese Export Porcelain Beaker, Kangxi, hatching lines


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Chinese: Porcelain: Pre 1700: Item # 1146502

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Deep beaker. Provenance: China. Dating: Kangxi period (1662-1722), c.1700. Mark: Artemisia leaf mark, underglaze blue. Deep beaker, splayed foot, knopped domed base, a flat knob between the foot and the elongated upright body with a slightly spreading mouthrim. Decorated in underglaze blue with, so-called, criss-cross hatching lines technique. The criss-cross hatching lines are not a Chinese way of painting on porcelain and may have been influenced by the Dutch. This technique was short-lived for it mostly occurs on blue-and-white export wares around 1700. It occurs on teacups and saucers, beakers and small jars with covers, garnitures and other items. The style was short lived. disappearing in the early 18th century. (source: C.J.A. Jörg / M. Flecker, Porcelain from the Vung Tau Wreck, The Hallstrom Excavation, United Kingdom 2001) On the foot a scroll of single leaves. On the body bands of petal panels decorated with stylised wisteria in hatching lines. Round the waist and the outer and inner rim a band of zig-zag lines. According to C.J.A. Jörg in his book, Porcelain from the Vung Tau Wreck, The Hallstrom Excavation. Sun Tree Publishing, UK 2010, ISBN 10: 981-04-5208-X , p.66, this beaker originally must have had a cover. The frits and chips to the rim may be caused by the many times this cover had been put to the top of the beaker during its lifetime. As it use to have a lid this beaker may have been used to contain hot drinks that needed to be kept warm. This beaker is fairly capacious and so hot chocolate comes to mind, a beverage which people drank in larger portions than coffee or tea. Cocoa was first brought to Europe by the Spaniards from Mexico in the 1st half of the 16th century. From Spain the cocoa beans were traded to Italy and The Netherlands, First used as a medicine, later at the end of the 17th century it was consumed as a pleasure drink, although it never became as popular tea and coffee. Unfortunately, there seem to be no paintings or prints showing such a beaker in use, nor do V.O.C., (Dutch United East India Company or Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie), documents give more detailed information. For a similar deep beaker see: Porcelain from the Vung Tau Wreck, The Hallstrom Excavation. ( C.J.A. Jörg / M. Flecker, Sun Tree Publishing Ltd, 2001), p.68 Fig. 56. The Vung Tau Cargo. Chinese export porcelain, sale catalogue Christie's Amsterdam, 7/8 April, Amsterdam 1992, p. 22-23 lot numbers 64-72. Dimensions: Height: 127 mm (5.00 inch), Diameter of mouthrim: 60 mm (2.36 inch) Diameter of footring: 39 mm (1.54 inch), Condition: A "J" shaped hairline and some glaze frits and chips to the rim. The cover is lacking. References: C.J.A. Jörg, Chinese Ceramics in the Collection of the Rijksmuseum, The Ming and Qing Dynasties, Amsterdam 1997, p.116, object 117. C.J.A. Jörg / M. Flecker, Porcelain from the Vung Tau Wreck, The Hallstrom Excavation, United Kingdom 2001, pp. 69-69, fig 55 tm 58. B. Jansen, Chinese Ceramiek Catalogus Haags Gemeentemuseum, Lochem 1976, p.112, object 242.