Treasures Of Our Past
All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Pre 1492 item #766605 (stock #T197)
Treasures Of Our Past
This wonderful pitcher is an absolute condition rarity which is in pristine "as the day it was made" condition. It measures 7 1/8 inches tall and 6 inches at the widest point of the handle. The slip is a bright white to a light gray with jet black paint that is 100% glazed. As the genuine Chaco pitchers always have there is a dimple on the bottom. This is the second finest Chaco pitcher I have ever had - you can compare it to the best Chaco I have had, which is listed here on this site, and that one sold for $18,500.00.

This is a great pitcher at an even greater price.

All Items : Archives : Pre 1492 item #752541 (stock #t-318)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD $13,300 May, 2014

This wonderful and rare effigy was excavated on the Tommy Cox ranch in New Mexico in the summer of 1998. It measures 7.25 inches long, 7.5 inches tall and 4.75" wide at the breast. The piece was made to be a canteen as evidenced by the two loops; one loop is at the tail and the other at the back of the neck. The top of the spout shows significant wear from what was most likely the stopper which held the water in. The eyes are each protruding and emphasized by a black mask-like design. It should be specifically noted that this piece has absolutely no restoration of any kind which means that all four of the legs are original and unbroken.

The sides exhibit a classic Reserve lightening design with the back a plain white. Of specific note is the symbol on the breast which is that of an upside down, headless, human. The significance of this symbol is not fully understood.

Effigy figures are some of the most highly sought of all the Anasazi pottery and perfect mint examples are exceedingly rare.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #749833 (stock #T105)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD

Socorro Olla C. 1050 - 1175AD, 13.5" x 14". There was chipping at the top rim of the neck that went down maybe, as much in some places, ½ inch and I had repaired by Hyatt Restorations. A hairline crack in the side (close photo). There is a crack in the bottom but nothing came apart; tiny piece in the bottom which looks like a little wedge that I had filled. There is a light but unobtrusive fire cloud mentioned for the sake of accuracy. Otherwise in wonderful whole condition and a very well done design. This is an exceptional value as similar pieces sell in excess of $15,000.00. The olla has killer line work which is why I bought it.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Pre 1492 item #748433 (stock #T-03002)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD

This incredible bowl C. 1100AD measures 6.4" in diameter is without question one of the greatest, if not the greatest, Mesa Verde ceramic bowl extant.

In order to fully understand the magnitude of this bowl one has to understand that the Mesa Verde culture virtually never included images of animals on their ceramics. If they did it was generally one image, sometimes indistinct, and was not the predominate feature of the piece. Two quote one dealer who has been in the business for over 30 years and has seen tens of thousands of pieces "Mesa Verde never put animals on their pottery. This bowl had to have been made for a very special reason - things had to have been bad with the hunts and they probably created this to enrich the hunts. I have never seen anything like it."

The bowl has a horn toad image in the bottom and around the inside images of 27, yes, 27 deer. If that was not enough there are additional 13 deer images on the exterior for a total of 40 deer!

When we purchased this bowl there was a crack that had been filled with Elmer’s glue. We have had a professional conservator remove the glue and the crack has been naturally closed and properly glued. The crack was further cleaned with hydrogen peroxide to help deemphasize the darker carbon core in the crack. A light trace of wood ash was also worked into the crack to soften its appearance. This can be removed with acetone in under five minutes if the new owner wishes.

With respect to condition, the bowl is intact without the addition of plaster or paint. The bowl was once in the collection of Ed Harris who is recognized as the greatest collector of prehistoric Native American ceramics.

This piece is destined for a collector or the institution that recognizes the true special nature of the bowl, it's rarity and innate beauty. A restoration report will be provided to the purchaser along with the other normal paperwork.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #748417 (stock #M-08001)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD

Kinishba is the rarest of all the White Mountain redwares. It came from only two sites, the Kinishba ruin which is now on the White Mountain Apache Reservation and the Pinedale ruin. ie. There are no more. This bowl is a famous bowl known to have been in the major collections since the 30’s; Ex. Cross, Dr. Thomas, Skousen, Schenck, Lyon. It measures 10.5” x 5”, mint condition. The bowl does not have any cracks, addition of paint or restoration of any kind. This bowl is pictured in the 1974 Arizona Highways magazine, Vol. 50, No. 2, p. 31 which is iconic in the collecting of Southwest Pottery (see attached scans). It is also pictured in Bill Schenck’s book Re-Creating The Word, Plate 74. I have been told it is pictured in a couple of other books but I have not seen them. Kinishaba is really the anchor of the White Mt redwares and this bowl is a solid ’10.’

A copy of the Arizona Highways magazine and Bill Schenck's book are included with the bowl.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #689111 (stock #T-957)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD!

Offered here is a Four Mile Bowl, Mint and Pristine, 8.5” x 3.65”. This bowl was dug by Bob Skousen of Mesa Arizona in either 1982 or 1983 at the Double Circle Ranch which he owned at the time. Bob sold it to Lee Cohen, former owner of Pueblo 1 Gallery in Scottsdale Arizona, in 1988 or 89. In 1989 Lee sold it to the fellow I recently purchased it from.

What makes this bowl so special is the original pristine condition and the beautiful and complex textile design in the bottom. Needless to say this bowl is both a style and condition rarity. It is truly a wonderful and rare item.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #688752 (stock #m-232)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD!

This incredible Mimbres geometric bowl measure 10.4" wide and 4" deep and is as pristine condition as the day it was made.

The interior exhibits two completely separate complex geometric forms. The first in the center has four elements arranged in an opposing patterns of bars each feathered to a center point. This design is very reminiscent of a woven basket. The second element is on the wall of the bowl - it is a negative pattern white line that extends through three different mazes and three different solid elements. The white line is continuous in such a fashion that it becomes a single element returning upon itself. In doing so it becomes a single element itself.

Without question this is one of the finest Mimbres geometric bowls extant - if that is not enough it is in perfect original condition.

Discovered in the early '80's by the owner of a five acre parcel of land in southeast Arizona ..... what a day it must have been for him when he found this bowl! No runs, cracks, chips or errors!!

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #688742 (stock #S-107)
Treasures Of Our Past
$4,800.00

This exceptionally large Hohokam, C. 400 - 1100AD, slate pallet measures 9 inches in length and exhibits a wonderful lizard form with extended appendages and a well defined face.

The majority of Hohokam pallets known are rectangular in form which sometimes have small handles in the forms of a rattlesnake or other lifeforms. A small number of pallets are in the shape of a lizard or horn toad; virtually all of them though are not very demonstrative having the legs being formed against the body or central pallet. Records indicate that there are three very special lizard pallets in private hands where the legs are stretched out as this example is.

The condition is excellent with the tail rejoined from a clean break as well as the front right leg - there is no breakage in the central body area.

This example is one of the three best examples known in private hands with the other two being in major collections with little chance of ever being on the market within the next decade. This is a rare opportunity to acquire a world-class example at a very reasonable price. Additional details are available, just call.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #688675 (stock #T432)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD IN 24 HOURS.

There are prehistoric ceramics and then there is this canteen. One of the great joys in handling, over the years, many great mint pieces of pottery is the realization that every once in a while an example comes along which defies all reason and sets a new standard of excellence ....in condition, design and execution. So it is with this wonderful canteen.

The surface of the canteen has been polished to such an extent that the white achieves almost a pearl finish; the black is jet black and the overall feel is that of an enameled stove.

The pictures show a beautiful rectilinear pattern with some highly unusual curved elements integrated into the design. Even more astounding is the presence of two human hand forms, one with four fingers and the other with five fingers. This is the only example of such that I have seen or that I can locate in a book. Inquiries with experts in the field confirm the rare nature of the presence of the hand images. All in all - a piece truly without equal.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #659444 (stock #X3)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD
Offered here is a truly wonderful classic Mimbres bowl with a perfectly executed powerful image of a deer. This Deer bowl is late Mimbres C. 1100AD (indicated by the three top bands on the inside) and the bowl measures 10" x 4.8", broken and glued with "Santa Fe Style" restoration (which means the bulk of the cracks on the inside have minor filling). The slip is very white and the paint is darker than the photos tend to show. There are three small pieces 100% in the white field behind the deer's rump which are patched (can see in photo #56); one tiny piece also in the white field in front of the mouth and a piece almost solely in the horizontal lines within the body of the deer which had been the kill. It was patched so the eye would not just go to the center hole. This was purchased by a major Arizona collector in the group about seven years ago for an allocated price of $19,000. At the Santa Fe Antique Indian Art Show, August 2006 this bowl was offered by another dealer for sale at $22,000.00. I recently purchased, as part of a larger collection, this bowl from the owner who bought it seven years ago so I can offer it at a much better price.

The restoration, which can be reversed without harm, is minor and was done to enhance the aesthetic values since it is such a wonderful and powerful image. At $22,000 it was priced at full retail; here at $15,000.00 it is a very fair, almost wholesale price.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Pre 1492 item #631164 (stock #H-786)
Treasures Of Our Past

Homolovi pottery comes from only two sites near Winslow Arizona and is one of the important types that bridged the gap from Anasazi to Hopi pottery. The area was popular for cotton farming, as evidenced by the weaving looms, spindle whorls and massive amounts of cottonseed that have been found at the ruins. The nearby Little Colorado River provided water for the inhabitants, the cotton and their other crops. The site was along the prehistoric Palatkwapi Trail, which ran from Montezuma Castle to the Hopi mesas. Trading of cotton, pottery and parrots was common between the many prehistoric sites in northern Arizona. At the peak, it is estimated, 5,000 people lived at Homolovi. Homolovi II, the largest of the four pueblos, it had three plazas and stone walls rising two to three stories, and housed several thousand people. In the 1400s, the area was abandoned, just as were many other Southwest ruins.

This wonderful bowl is in perfect condition measuring 8 5/8 inches by 3 inches while exhibiting a classic Homolovi design in black on a deep orange-red clay body. Pieces from the Homolovi tradition are very scarce and down-right rare when in perfect mint condition.

The Homolovi tradition marks a beginning evolution to the protohistoric Hopi pieces and are the genesis of the Hopi pottery of today.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #627547 (stock #M-122)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD

This beautiful Mimbres bowl (c. 1100AD) measures about 10.8" wide, is broken and glued from only four pieces and has no restoration or addition of paint. The superb images are very strong and the bowl has a special presence in that it fired in an environment which had oxygen causing it to take on a warm, almost glowing, red color. Without question a wonderful example of the high levels the Mimbres artists attained.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #627544 (stock #M-121)
Treasures Of Our Past

Little needs to be said about this bowl C. 1100AD which measures 11.25" wide, is broken and glued with very minor restoration amounting to less than 3%, mostly in the blank center field. The artwork is superb and the condition exceptional as most Mimbres pieces, except the very high end, tend to have more restoration and repainting.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #627162 (stock #C234)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD

This is without question the finest Snowflake pitcher, and one of the finest of any of the prehistoric southwestern cultures, I have ever encountered. The pitcher measures 5.3" wide and 5.0 inches tall, is perfectly made and exhibits artwork that is beyond belief. As many know the designs were placed on the ceramic pieces with a brush made from the very fine hairs found in the leaves of yucca plants. They did not use stencils or layout lines to prepare for their work. The designs were placed on by freehand and in understanding that it is virtually impossible to believe this very complex and perfectly laid out design could have been accomplished - but obviously it was. The photos speak for themselves - reward yourself and spend a little time examining the attached photos and wonder for yourself how four perfectly placed spiral elements were drawn; each swirl is interconnected with the one to either side. The stepped diagonal designs are not only done with perfectly straight line elements but they are perfectly spaced; note the breaks in the circumference lines and how those breaks naturally flow into the rest of the design. And yes it is intact unbroken condition!! The pitcher was recently purchased from the collection of Dr. Fredrick Lau of Phoenix, AZ.

The new owner of this pitcher will be especially fortunate to have this pitcher which should bring years of enjoyment.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #625964 (stock #C-321)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD

Offered here is a very scarce and beautiful Chaco (C. 1050 - 1150AD) double lug olla measures just under 12" wide and 10" tall. The type is generally found in the northwestern portions of New Mexico and extending into the eastern portions of Arizona near what is now Sanders and St. Johns Arizona. This is obviously a cave pot exhibiting mineral deposits at the bottom and inside. The olla is intact with no structural restoration whatsoever and shows some very minor erosion at the very bottom which is clear in one picture. The design is classic Chaco and actually somewhat complex for Chaco exhibiting the traditional cross-hatched bands and an interesting locked together pattern of the bands which is normally seen on the much later Tularosa pieces. Also at the top are the fancy multiple swirl patterns which are a traditional Chaco element. The bottom is dimpled which is a definite sign of the classic Chaco period and is virtually always seen on Chaco ollas, pitchers, seed jars and some bowls. It measures just under 12" wide and 10" tall. One side, which I’m sure was somewhat exposed toward the outside of the cave had the design somewhat faded (about the size of a grapefruit . . . that portion of the design was slightly enhanced to bring the intensity of the black paint up to the same level of the rest of the pot. This is a highly desirable piece eagerly sought out by collectors and museums alike which want to show the ever popular Chaco type.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Americas : American Indian : Pre 1492 item #589626 (stock #WC-004)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD

This is a wonderful and virtually perfect Wingate C. 1050AD bowl which measures a large 11.25 inches wide and 5.5 inches deep. It has a deep black and highly refined and executed design for Wingate ceramics, a deep almost blood red slip, the surface of which is highly polished. The exterior has some minor spalding due to some moisture which did not effect any of the interior. There is a insignificant tiny 3/8 by 1/16 inch chip on the rim which has been repaired.

This is a condition rarity when it comes to the classic Wingate tradition.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Americas : American Indian : Pre 1492 item #588534 (stock #WC-003)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD

This wonderful bowl is a very scarce type found in the areas surrounding Flagstaff Arizona. The name is taken from a small canyon to the east of Flagstaff which is now a National Monument, Walnut Canyon. The bowl measures 9 inches across and a very deep 6 inches; it is 100% original with no restoration or addition of paints. There is an extremely fine hairline crack which can be seen in the side photo at about 1 o’clock; it is totally insignificant but mentioned for the sake of accuracy.

The slip is a thin white and the vegetal paint is dark and consistent throughout the bowl. Nice examples of Walnut Canyon bowls have become very difficult to find as is true for all of the high-end Anasazi pottery.

All Items : Archives : Regional Art : Pre 1492 item #577189 (stock #C-8082)
Treasures Of Our Past
SOLD!

Any ceramic from the Four Mile culture which is not a bowl is quite scarce and desirable. This diminutive olla measures 4.2 inches by 3.3 inches and is glued from several pieces. There is no restoration or addition of paint. The exterior exhibits opposing positive/negative stepped design separated by what appears to be a centipede design. Like the Showlow olla also listed on the site, this has many small squares each with a dot in the center. The white band on the neck exhibits ticking.

One would look for a very long time to find another olla like this one.