Black Memorabilia Drug Store Pharmacy Medical Apothecary Stonegate Antiques Stonegate Antiques
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All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1940 item #1265850 (stock #BA909)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
These racially derogatory, circa early 1930's, BLACK FACE, cardboard advertising boxes are labeled "Nigger Head Tees". Once containing eight golf tees, the tees unfortunately, have long ago been used and lost. The boxes are extraordinarily rare, and this offering is the first I have ever had in my many years of specializing in Black Americana.

Measuring 2 inches high x 3/4 inches deep x 1.5 inches wide, these cardboard boxes remain in extraordinary condition given their age and potentially fragile paper construction medium! Other than surface wear and age discoloration as seen in photos, the boxes, amazingly, remain in phenomenal condition. Photos depict all sides of the boxes.

The boxes are marked "Distributed by "Philbot Brokfrage Co. Inc, 31-35 Drumm Street San Francisco". Additional labeling indicates that the boxes originally sold for 10 cents with Patent Pending.

An extremely RARE piece of Black Americana made more collectible given their racially derogatory title. They are offered at $125 each or $198 firm for the pair.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1910 item #794350 (stock #BA704)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is the 1902, 'Pore Lil Mose' Comic by legendary artist R.F. Outcault entitled, "HE TREATS HIS FRIENDS TO SODA WATER", featuring a multitude of scenes in a turn-of-the-century drug store or apothecary shop!

The Pore Lil' Mose series was created in 1900 by The New York Herald cartoonist, Richard F. Outcault, the creator of the more popularly known 'Yellow Kid' and 'Buster Brown' comic strips. Pore Lil' Mose was the first Black comic strip.

Measuring 14.75" x 11.75" framed, the comic remains in very fine condition with excellent, vivid color, and no rips or repairs. It is framed in an old black wooden frame with a heavy cardboard backing and would benefit from professional framing using archival, acid-free materials to enhance its life for many years to come.

Highly sought after among Black Americana collectors!

The history of the Pore lil' Mose comic strip:

In creating Pore Lil’ Mose, R.F. Outcault took an absurd concept of a 7 year old black kid living on his own in 1901 New York City with his monkey, bear, dog, and cat friends and was able to make people laugh and at times, take a critical look at themselves and the world they lived in.

The “Pore Lil’ Mose” series was far ahead of its time in social commentary and portrayal of blacks. Before he was a cartoonist, Outcault was a masterful illustrator working for Thomas Edison producing complex illustrations for Edison’s laboratories as well as illustrating for some of the largest newspapers and magazines of the late 1800’s. In the beginning, cartooning was just a way for Outcault to make additional income and have fun. Because of his experience as an illustrator, his early cartoons were drawn with more detail and skill than other cartoonist and are rich in artistic and historical detail.

What truly makes “Pore Lil’ Mose” stand out from other black cartoons of the period is Outcault’s portrayal of blacks. One should keep in mind that in 1900, the Civil War had only been over for 35 years, and the civil rights movement of the 1960’s was still over sixty years away. “Pore Lil’ Mose” was the first comic strip to have a black character as its main protagonist, and for over half a century, “Pore Lil’ Mose” was the only comic strip to have portrayed blacks as judges, teachers and other professionals. When one views the 70 plus “Pore Lil’ Mose” strips, one sees that Outcault created a character in Mose who was polite, kind, generous, accepting, intelligent and at times a deeply profound thinker who loved his family and friends. Pore Lil’ Mose can be viewed as a role model for every human being regardless or race or ethnicity.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1930 item #950232 (stock #BA768)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 10 1/2 inches high x 6 inches in diameter, this very visually appealing, very difficult to find, bright orange, 4 pound size, VINTAGE “MAMMY’S FAVORITE BRAND COFFEE” TIN is in near-excellent condition!

Some superficial scratches and rubs to the lithograph most notably on the back side of the tin above Mammy’s head. Structural integrity of the tin is quite sound with no holes, piercings, breaks, or dents, and only scarce, superficial rusting to base. See photos. (Please disregard any variation in surface color that may appear in some photos. Color is vivid and uniform throughout. Any color variation seen in photos is due to outdoor lighting conditions and light reflections, and not tin discoloration.)

This wonderful tin dates to the early 1920’s features a vivid graphic of "Mammy Serving Coffee". Processed and packaged by the C. D. Kenny Company of Baltimore, Maryland, this fabulous tin no longer retains its bail handle but does have its original cover!

In just wonderful condition with the front side displaying fabulously, this very difficult to find early coffee pail is an especially lovely and visually appealing piece of vintage Black Americana advertising!!!

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1950 item #428998 (stock #BA529)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring approximately 12 inches in height, these vintage plastic dolls were offered as Aunt Jemima Company premiums in 1949! Purchase price was 25 cents each plus 3 box tops from any Aunt Jemima product! They were sold as cutouts for the buyer to sew together and then stuff as desired.

This pair was machine stitched and lightly stuffed with cotton batting. Aunt Jemima holds a stack of her famous pancakes while Uncle Mose politely holds his top hat in his hands.

Both dolls retain their vivid, brilliant color and are free of rips, tears, holes. Some teeny dirt spots/stains here and there, and Aunt Jemima has a little, 1 inch long, heat-related indentation in her apron--maybe from being stored in an attic and having something press into her? Not a big deal- no tear to plastic - just an impression into the plastic that does blend into the "wrinkliness" of her form anyway.....

A very colorful pair that displays quite nicely as seen in photos! **Please note that any white marks seen in photos are flash reflections only and are not damage to the dolls.**

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Pre 1930 item #384238 (stock #BA718)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Circa 1920’s, this all original piece of Black Memorabilia advertising, Carter’s INKY RACER, comes complete with its very colorful and “graphically appealing” cardboard box along with the two original, rubber-stoppered, glass, ink-removing-solution bottles, and amazingly, the extremely rare, directions-for-use paper pamphlet!

Both the exterior and interior of the cardboard box features the well-known “running black boy logo” making this item an eye-appealing display piece!

Condition is near excellent with some age-related and expected subtle wear to corners of the box(see photos). The box remains quite structurally sound, and its condition suggests that this piece received little handling over the years. Closed, the box measures 3 1/4 x 2 3/4 x 1 1/4 inches. Bottle #1 retains 1/3 of its ink erasing solution while bottle #2's remaining contents have dried to a white powder. Quite unusual to find contents of this product intact after so many years! The paper instructional pamphlet is in mint condition absent the fold marks which allow the pamphlet to be made small enough to slip inside this diminutive box.

A must-have for the Black Memorabilia collector--particularly in this fabulous condition!!

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1920 item #162895 (stock #BA722)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
This VERY RARE, delightful, circa 1915, doll or toy-sized Advertising Display Trunk is a creative sales mechanism for New York-based, RESTORFF & BETTMANN- Manufacturer's of GLYCEROLE SHOE OIL!

This fabulous metal trunk display features the likeness of 4 Black Gentleman within its copper-toned, product advertisement appearing on the interior of the trunk lid! Product testimonials are written in English, French, German,& Spanish!

Measuring 13 inches long x 8 3/4 inches wide x 7 1/2 inches high, this wonderful early trunk is in remarkable, un-restored, all-original condition and retains its original, functional lock and key! Minor surface scratches are evident along edges where wear is generally expected in an item of this age. Such scratches are most evident on the rear panel. These imperfections do not detract from the striking visual appeal of the trunk! This trunk is actually in quite remarkable condition for its 90+ years of age!

A high quality item when originally produced, please note the trunk's wonderful exterior lithographed details which mimic the exterior of an actual trunk!

A fabulous and extremely RARE, early advertising piece that doubles as a unique and RARE BLACK AMERICANA COLLECTIBLE!

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1940 item #520391 (stock #BA587,8,9)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered for sale are 3 different 1930’s Belgian Metal Polish tins featuring a wonderful Smiling Black Man Logo! All are priced separately---the large at $175.00, and the two small tins at $145.00 each.

All three tins are in very fine condition with some very small spots of superficial rust and teeny superficial surface scratches here and there as would be expected of any item 70+ years of age. These were stored well over the years and their condition reflects this! The largest tin is in the most pristine. The two black, white and red tins are empty but the green and yellow tin still has a hardened lump of polish inside. The large tin measures 5 6/8 inches high, the small black tin measures 4 1/4 inches high, and the green tin measures 4 inches high.

These tins are not readily found on today’s market in this condition and would provide a handsome and visually striking display either as a group of 3 or as a single piece! A nice addition to the advanced Black Memorabilia collection!

As each tin is priced separately, please email us stating which tin you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1930 item #335932 (stock #BA158)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 5 5/8 inches long x 3/8 inches in diameter, this very RARE, unmarked piece of 1920’s Black Memorabilia Folk Art features an exquisitely carved miniature Blackamoor’s head at its apex!

The very unusual piece is constructed entirely of (unidentified)wood with the tiny Blackamoor’s head separated from the length of the dice pusher by a teeny narrow metal band. It is unknown whether the dice pusher is carved from one single piece of wood or if the dice pusher and head are two distinct pieces.

Other than reasonable and minor wear to the very tip of the dice pusher as seen in photos, this incredible piece is in superb, all original condition !!

The Blackamoor's head is carved with remarkable expertise and attention to detail, which the photos, unfortunately, do not adequately represent; due to the diminutive size of this piece, sharp close-up photos were very difficult to attain- my apologies!

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1900 item #421164 (stock #BA 514)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
This stately, titled, English Staffordshire figure of a seated Uncle Tom and Little Eva was produced circa 1855. Inspired by Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1853 publication of her controversial “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”, the figure depicts the gentle Uncle Tom bouncing his little mistress, Miss Eva, on his knee.

The figure is decorated in underglaze black, measures 9 inches high, and is in perfect condition with the exception of expected and appropriate superficial crackling to the glaze, and a shallow and very tight, early hairline to the back of the figure at its base. It is titled “Uncle Tom & Eva” on the front base.

An very exceptional piece of Black Memorabilia for the discriminating collector.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1900 item #364941 (stock #BA446)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
This fabulous later 19th century/early 20th century, wool, needlepoint sampler measures 19" wide by 17" long and contains many truly fascinating images that add to the mystery of the sampler’s origin: an American flag and a Royal crown, a Canadian maple leaf, numerous varieties of lovely flowers, two black children on a see-saw, a black girl with her hands on her hips, a center hall style colonial era home, a woman carrying a bag with her hand extended out to a little dog, "Jumbo" the elephant from the circus; a yellow Labrador Retriever, several cats, a rooster, horse, and winged bug, a doe and stag, a bird on a branch, 2 little children -- a girl and boy -- with their backs to us, the initial “S” repeated twice, what appears to be a Celtic design, and a cross with wreath.

One cannot help but wonder whether or not this sampler was completed by black female who was illustrating her life history which included involvement in the UNDERGROUND RAILROAD! The references to BOTH Canada (the maple leaf and the crown) and the US (the American Flag) along with the black images are rather curious, making this a very plausible theory! The sampler certainly depicts happy images of life within an affluent (Irish?) household. Hmmm…could this well-executed sampler have possibly been completed by an ex-slave?????

This magnificent sampler is in very good condition for its 100+ years of age. There is some running of the red wool yarns, most probably the result of a previous owner’s attempt to clean the piece. This likely can be removed professionally, although I do not feel it is a significant detraction and question the necessity of attempting to do so. The edges are a bit frayed, but there are no dirt stains, holes, tears, or repairs, and except for isolated areas, the needlepoint stitching remains in wonderful condition!

This colorful and mysterious sampler would be a thought-provoking addition to one’s Black Americana collection!

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1920 item #831540 (stock #BA730)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Please note: This item was photographed under glass, and thus some photos depict unavoidable light reflection which distorts both color and condition. Coloring of poster is rich and is uniform throughout with consistent color and tone. Please view all photos for true representation of fine condition.

Offered is a fabulous and very seldom found World War I recruitment poster that honors the service of the African-American male Army Calvary soldier.

Tastefully rendered, this 17" x 20" paper lithographed poster on cardboard depicts a World War I African-American Calvary soldier bidding farewell to his proud sweetheart/wife as his regiment marches forward off to war in the background.

This rarely found poster is entitled, "COLORED MAN IS NO SLACKER". It was published in 1918 by S.G. Renesch of Chicago (thus printed in lower left hand corner), and is one of only two WWI recruitment posters that were published for the purpose of encouraging the enlistment of male African-Americans. The theme of the two different posters was to offer participation in the first World War as an opportunity for African Americans to demonstrate their patriotism and serve their country. (The second recruitment poster was entitled "True Sons of Freedom" and invoked the memory of Abraham Lincoln and the staunch bravery of black troops to inspire African Americans to enlist.)

The poster remains in its original, black-painted, wooden frame with glass, with original nails holding the poster in place in the back.

The poster remains in very fine condition for its 90+ years of age, showing some subtle wrinkling of paper to the lower 1/5th of the poster, likely the result of subjection to dampness, although, please note, that NO water staining is present.

This poster is a credit to the service of the many African-American men who so faithfully served and died to protect the liberty of the United States of America.

A must-have addition to one's Black Memorabilia or Militaria collection!

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1930 item #335787 (stock #BA378)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 1 3/4 inches in diameter x ¼ inch high, this circa 1920’s, dexterity game depicting a smiling Blackamoor is quite colorful and is very visually appealing! The puzzle contains the tiniest of 5 white balls that, with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed in the Blackamoor’s upturned mouth to serve as his teeth!

Constructed of tin with a glass cover and a cardboard backing, the puzzle is in all original, very nice condition, with the Blackamoor graphic remaining free of scratches and abrasions with all paint intact! (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.) Very light soiling may be seen on the underside of the glass cover and could be cleaned if desired.

This German-made puzzle is marked with its country of origin: D.RG.M.116769. The cardboard puzzle back has suffered from wear with approximately 2/3 of the paper surface advertising peeled away. What remains indicates that this game was used to advertise a canned food product by the Anderson Food Company of Camden, New Jersey.

A delightful piece of early Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1900 item #950236 (stock #BA767)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Once part of the Middle Passage Museum inventory, these authentic and extraordinarily RARE adult’s slave shackles have been de-accessioned. These plantation-made, iron, 19th century shackles were once used on a Georgia plantation. They remain all-original and untouched with over 170 years of patina. Superficial rust is present with structural integrity unaffected. These RARE shackles measure a total of 29 inches in length with fourteen, worn, chain links. A horrible, tangible testament to the malevolence of slavery.

Also currently offered for sale and priced separately are two extraordinarily RARE sets of CHILD's slave shackles-- one set retaining the ORIGINAL KEY. This set of shackles is featured in the last photo. Please type the word "shackles" in the search box on our home page to find all 3 sets of shackles currently offered.

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1940 item #404216 (stock #BA510)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 9 inches high, this delightful example of Folk Art styling, is one of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women. It has been speculated that their creation was encouraged through FDR’s Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1936-1940.

This doll depicts the black stick or kindling gatherer. He holds a bunch of sticks tied together with string that has been flung over his right shoulder. In his left hand, he holds a wooden walking stick. This is an older gentleman who wears a straw hat, gray beard and hair and has embroidered facial features –most characteristic of these dolls. Also characteristic of this type of doll is a small square of asphalt shingle glued to the feet to serve as a stand. This gent has lost his shingle stand but the remnants are still visible glued to the bottom of his leather shoes. Clothing is machine-sewn cotton with careful detailing right down to the patch on his left knee and the red hanker chief poking out of his right pocket. His body is brown cotton stuffed with cotton batting.

A very special doll that takes a snapshot of history in capturing the life of the poor southern black of the Depression era.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Pre 1940 item #264032 (stock #BA385)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Increasingly more and more difficult to find, this pot metal pencil sharpener was made in pre-WWII Germany in the 1930's.

Measuring 1.5 inches long x 1 inch wide, this sharpener depicts a derogatory caricature of a Black Man. The glaring eyes are painted a stark white with teeny black pupils, while the red painted lips surround the pencil sharpener blade which takes the place of the man's teeth. Curly molded hair and eyebrows are painted black, while the face is painted brown- inside and out.

The pencil sharpener is stamped GERMANY on the back inside.

Condition is quite fine with approximately 80% (a conservative estimate) of the original paint remaining. There is no repaint! The paint is worn in expected areas, with the majority of paint wear seen on the sides of the face and bottom of the chin where one would grasp the sharpener. Facial feature paint is strong. Brown paint on the inside/back of sharpener is 100%!

Germany apparently made a good steel blade as the sharpener still works!

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1950 item #1253947 (stock #BA903)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD---Priced as a Pair
Measuring approximately 7 inches long by 1.75 inches high, these untouched, unused, all-original, porcelain-enameled, 1940-50s, metal signs are extraordinarily RARE pieces of Black American history-- artifacts of the "Jim Crow" era when segregation of the African American race was unfortunately, most commonplace.

These signs were found in March of 1971, inside the abandoned and decaying basement of the former Philadelphia Enameling Works factory at the corner of 13th and Vine Streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The gentleman from whom these signs were purchased, bought these segregation signs along with hundreds of others signs of all types found in the basement of this former factory (see last photo) and has very kindly written a letter of provenance which has been photographed here and which will be included with these signs upon their sale.

These historic signs are enameled on both sides, and on the front sides are written, "COLORED" and "WHITE". The signs feature dark navy blue lettering on a white background.

The signs are in all-original condition with some very minor discoloration and very unobtrusive edge discoloration pinpoints and some enameling loss here and there as seen in photos.

Extremely RARE, UNUSED, one-of-a-kind, museum-worthy pieces of Black American history that are quite likely the only ones of their kind extant today! Condition is amazing!

Also currently offered for separate sale at $995.00 and originating from this same collection is a pair of signs labeled "COLORED MEN" AND "COLORED WOMEN". (See last photo) Please take a moment to view these signs by simply by typing the word "segregation" into the SEARCH box on our homepage.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1940 item #404268 (stock #BA512)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 9 inches high, this delightful example of Folk Art styling, is one of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women. It has been speculated that their creation was encouraged through FDR’s Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1936-1940.

This doll depicts the black washerwoman. She holds an authentic-looking wood and tin washboard in her left arm. This gentlewoman wears a red kerchief on her head covering all hair and has embroidered facial features –most characteristic of these dolls. Also characteristic of this type of doll is a small square of asphalt shingle glued to the feet to serve as a stand. This doll still retains her original shingle stand but it has come loose from the left shoe. Clothing, with the exception of her navy-colored knit-fabric sweater, is machine-sewn cotton with careful detailing right down to the red hankie poking out of her apron pocket. Her body, which is well-stuffed to be anatomically correct, is black cotton fabric stuffed with cotton batting.

A very special doll that takes a snapshot of history in capturing the life of the poor southern black of the Depression era.

All Items : Archives : Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1900 item #832644 (stock #BA735)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is an extraordinarily RARE, pre-Civil War, Negro slave document from Decatur County, Georgia, dated May 1837.

This document is an exceptionally rare piece of historical ephemera in that it is the actual, formal and legal lawsuit filed by slave owner, Esther Miller, along with 25 other named male citizens of Decatur County, Georgia, against one Cader Powell for the "offense of beating, whipping, and assaulting a slave without sufficient provocation."

The document goes on to state that Cader Powell assaulted "a certain male slave named Issac (property of Esther Miller) with sticks, fists, cow pokins, and other dangerous weapons and then did unlawfully whip beat him, so that the healthy body of service of said slave was greatly injured without sufficient provocation being first given by said slave to the great annoyance of the said Esther Miller, the lawful owner of said slave..."

While one would like to think that this formal lawsuit was filed as a result of the tremendous outrage against humanity felt by the 26 parties bringing the suit, one has to consider that this lawsuit was more likely filed due to financial considerations--that the cruelly assaulted slave, Issac's, monetary value as owned, usable property was greatly diminished as a result of his beating. It is quite reasonable to infer that the slave, Isaac, suffered permanent physical injury as a result of his beating and that his monetary worth was thus, permanently devalued.

Regardless of the motivation behind the filing of the lawsuit, to find such extant documentation describing the conditions of southern slavery as well as the objection of slave-owners to the cruel and inhumane treatment of a slave is rare indeed.

The document remains in excellent, all-original condition. It measures 7.75 inches wide x 9.75 inches long.