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RARE Authentic 19thC Georgia SMALL CHILD SLAVE Shackles

RARE Authentic 19thC Georgia SMALL CHILD SLAVE Shackles


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Directory: Popular Collectibles: Memorabilia: Black Americana: Pre 1900: Item # 1215067

Please refer to our stock # BA866 when inquiring.
 $1,595.00 
Once part of the Middle Passage Museum benefactor's inventory, these authentic and extraordinarily RARE, ultra-small, child slave shackles have been de-accessioned from the personal collection of the museum's anonymous Georgia benefactor who is cited below.

These iron, plantation-made, 19th century shackles were once used on a Georgia plantation in Americus, Georgia, just outside of Plains. They remain all-original and untouched with twenty two small chain links, measuring a total of 26.5 inches in length. The interior diameter of the cuffs at their narrowest point measure just over 2 1/8 inches across--the tiniest child shackle set I have ever offered. An utterly horrible, tangible testament to the malevolence of slavery.

The anonymous museum benefactor from Georgia kept this particular set aside from those items he had planned to donate to the Middle Passage Museum due to the very tiny diameter size of the cuffs---the smallest slave cuffs he had ever found in his many years of collecting which began in the early 1950's before the collectible field of Black Americana was popular or even socially or politically acceptable.

Also currently offered for sale and priced separately are a set of 19th century, hand-made, Georgia, Jone's County plantation, adult slave shackles with KEY, a fabulous, 19th century set of Louisiana Slave Ship shackles, and an ultra-rare, 19th century, slave rattle shackle out of the Charleston, South Carolina area -- all very atypical finds! Please type the word "shackles" in the search box on our home page to find these sets of shackles.

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."