Ethnic Collectible Jewelry + Artifacts
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1970 item #974800 (stock #0900e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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These are gorgeous vintage large Juliana earrings that I bought from a woman who said they belonged to her grandmother, and are circa 1967-'68, which is when the line was manufactured. The colors are vibrant and sparkling purple, fuchsia, lime green, lavender, and black. They are in great vintage condition with no damage. They measure 2” long x ¾” at the widest point. These are superb party-goers! Vintage Juliana Jewelry was manufactured by DeLizza & Elster Company, also known as D&E jewelry. They were in business from 1947-1990. Their Juliana line only existed in 1967 and 1968.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1970 item #1076304 (stock #00111000MW)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
$500.00
This extraordinary bracelet is one of the most gorgeous pieces to ever come out of the Taller Los Castillo. It was designed by Antonio Castillo’s daughter, Emilia (or Mimi) who still makes jewelry to this day. She is also known for her beautiful ceramics – some with precious metals infused. The Aztec symbol on this bracelet is repeated on each of the 6 links to form a striking and bold overall design. This exquisite work of art weighs a hefty 136.0 grams, so it’s not for the faint of heart to wear. It is marked, “.925, Mexico, TA-01, Mimi Castillo”, and then “Los Castillo, Taxco” in a circle. It measures 9-1/2” around and each link is 1-3/8”X1-1/2”, making it a piece that could be worn by a man or a woman. In either case, it is certainly a luxurious statement piece of remarkable import.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1950 item #1020500 (stock #001140e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This clamper bracelet is an exceptional example of the classic, fine workmanship of one of the old silver masters of Mexico Antonio Reina. Reina worked for Margot de Taxco producing her intricate and challenging designs. This bracelet has the same painstaking character as any of Margot's work. It is an elegant treasure from the 1940's and unmatched in silver items you see today. It measures 2- 3/8" width at the front and is 2-5/16" diameter unopened, and weighs 62 grams. The inside diameter is 7" and can be opened to wear on a somewhat larger wrist. It is marked, "Sterling, Taxco, 37, Hecho En Mexico, 925, and AAR" for Antonio Reina. The hinge is tight and it is in excellent vintage condition. This is a magnificent piece of old Taxco silver artistry.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1960 item #1046040 (stock #001176e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This vintage Mexican solid copper bracelet is truly a unique work of art. It is adorned with beautifully executed silver and brass Aztec symbols. The motif on this bracelet is of an Aztec Day symbol: Cuauhtli or Eagle. Cuauhtli is a day of fighting for freedom and equality. It is a good day for action, a bad day for reflection. A good day for invoking the gods, a bad day for ignoring them. This bracelet of mixed metals is typical of those made by Maya and her workshop, Casa Maya, in the 1960’s and ’70s. Her work is recognizable by their modernist, sometimes surreal designs, stylized pre-Columbian themes, and use of mixed metals and sometimes polychrome. This bracelet is completely hand wrought by cutting the copper and shaping it by hammering to size. The hammer marks are purposely left to add texture. The silver and brass pieces are cut by hand and soldered on to the copper. It measures 6-3/4” around the outside with an opening of about one inch. It is 2” wide at the widest point. It weighs 80.8 grams. The bracelet can be fit to accommodate a different size as long as you are careful not to bend to a dramatically different size. The artist who crafted this was very skilled because the piece is impeccably executed. It is marked, “Mexico”. It is in beautiful vintage condition with only normal wear. It also has a pair of matching earrings listed separately.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1950 item #1050287 (stock #001176e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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Powerful and stately, this extraordinary bracelet is like no other I have seen. The work on it was obviously done by a brilliant artist because it is impeccable in its design, quality, and consistency. The hallmark looks like it may have been done by Salvador del la Serna, but some of it is missing probably from wear. It is, “Silver, Mexico, L”. The script looks exactly the same as his mark and the craftsmanship is the best. His shop was in Mexico City and he produced primarily hollowware and supplied some goods to Taxco. This artist is noted in Billie Hougart's book, The Little Book of Mexican Silver Trade and Hallmarks. It appears to be circa 1940’s. The intricate design is built up in several layers to the beautiful red faceted stones. The red stones have a few little scratches and I am unsure of their origin. Each of the four links is massive and adorned with heavily incised leaves and flowers and substantial connecting links. It tests higher than 925 silver and I suspect it may be 980. It weighs 68.5 grams, is 7-3/8” wearable length, and is 2-3/8” at the widest point. The bracelet is in excellent vintage condition. This piece is truly a collectors’ item and will be an unrivaled addition to any collection.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1950 item #996189 (stock #010500e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
$400.00
This vintage Mexican solid copper bracelet is truly a unique work of art. It is adorned with beautifully executed silver and brass Aztec symbols. The motif on this bracelet is of an Aztec Day symbol: Cuauhtli or Eagle. Cuauhtli is a day of fighting for freedom and equality. It is a good day for action, a bad day for reflection. A good day for invoking the gods, a bad day for ignoring them. This bracelet of mixed metals is typical of those made by Maya and her workshop, Casa Maya, in the 1960’s and ’70s. Her work is recognizable by their modernist, sometimes surreal designs, stylized pre-Columbian themes, and use of mixed metals and sometimes polychrome. This bracelet is completely hand wrought by cutting the copper and shaping it by hammering to size. The hammer marks are purposely left to add texture. The silver and brass pieces are cut by hand and soldered on to the copper. It measures 6-3/4” around the outside with an opening of about one inch. It is 2” wide at the widest point. It weighs 80.8 grams. The bracelet can be fit to accommodate a different size as long as you are careful not to bend to a dramatically different size. The artist who crafted this was very skilled because the piece is impeccably executed. It is marked, “Mexico”. It is in beautiful vintage condition with only normal wear.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1960 item #1132834 (stock #1000105RL)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
$400.00
Certainly a modernist piece, this bracelet has a strong sculptural appeal. It is bold, vibrant, and makes a statement. Immaculately designed, it has a step-and-repeat raised design of what look like symbols covering the surface. The designer remains a mystery because the only mark is, “925”, on the inside. A deeply incised crosshatch is engraved as a background which is heavily patinaed and surrounds the raised silver symbols. The inside also has a heavy patina. This bracelet reminds me of the work of M Schon, Art Smith, or Fred Davis. It measures 5-3/4” around with a 1-1/8” gap. This bracelet is in excellent vintage condition with a few scratches on the surface as expected from an old piece. I place it circa late 1950’s-1960.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1960 item #1122898 (stock #0001186e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This is without a doubt the most beautiful Jerusalem cross I have seen in a long time. It is 935 silver, so it’s better than sterling. The face is completely covered with tiny silver balls, rope, chain designs topped by a beautiful green faceted stone. It is hard to tell if it is glass or a real stone, but nevertheless, it is an unbelievable green. It is marked, “Jerusalem, Sterling, 935”. This cross is quite old - probably from the 1950’s. It measures 2-1/3X2-5/8” and is a hefty 36 grams. It is drop-dead-gorgeous!
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1940 item #1053603 (stock #001189e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
$350.00
This antique Peruvian Sterling silver link bracelet is a treasure of the artistry of an old Peruvian silversmith. Each link is covered with incised pattern and texture and depicts various figures of Inca legends, including an Inca warrior, Viracocha, and an Eagle. There is a pre-Incan legend that speaks of Viracocha who is depicted in many forms. Viracocha, as the feathered serpent god, is one of the great mysteries of ancient American cultures. He was called Kukulkan by the Mayas, Quetzalcoatl by the Aztecs, Viracocha by the Incas, Gucumatz in Central America, Votan in Palenque and Zamna in Izamal. It is probably circa 1930's-'40's. The design and the way the links are curved and connected to each other is quite remarkable. The hallmarks are, "925, Peru, AS”. It weighs a massive 71.1 grams. Each of the 5 links is approximately 1-7/8” long x 1-3/8” wide, making the total wearable length approximately 7”. The tongue and box closure fasten with a positive “snap. This unusual and spectacular bracelet is in excellent condition and does not appear to have any damage. This is an amazing piece of Peruvian silver artistry and a true collector’s item.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1930 item #1021810 (stock #001142e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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Here is a sublimely original and rare find. This bracelet from the 1920’s-1930’s is an important piece because of its primitive yet sophisticated design and scale. Large and showy, this bracelet is unlike any I’ve seen from the old Mexican silver masters and was created entirely by hand. This is an absolutely marvelous piece and one of the most captivating from the halcyon years of the Mexican silver renaissance. It is a series of eight alternating links of large Aztec stone or smaller silver faces. The rudimentary feel of the carved faces adds to the appeal. I believe the stone may be adventurine rather than jade. The piece weighs 70.2 grams, is 7” wearable length, and is 1-1/8” wide. The clasp is a simple tongue and box which fastens securely. It is simply marked, “sterling, Mexico”, which is typical of the earliest silver work done in Mexico during this period. This bracelet is the result of the renaissance that emanated from Taxco and flourished from the 1920's-1960's in several cities throughout Mexico. Beginning in the 1920's, the silver artisans of Mexico rose to a new definition of perfection in design and craftsmanship as the result of the strong influence and patronage of William Spratling, a talented architect and designer who engendered a city of tallers and jewelers in Taxco during that time. Mexico City also had a rich history of early tallers. The bracelet shows some wear around the settings and some are not perfectly true. It has the usual scratches and patina of a piece that is some 80 years old. It is quite beautiful and a stunning addition for anyone who appreciates historical Mexican silver artistry.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1930 item #998614 (stock #010800e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This ponderous bracelet is simply spectacular and is crafted from the highest 980 grade silver, which is greater silver content than 925 sterling. This elegant piece is in superb condition and has 7 impressively large amethyst stones – cabochons and expertly-carved insets. The markings are typical of the very early Mexican silver artists during the first half of the twentieth century and are simply, “TAXCO 980”. William Spratling, Antonio Pineda, Artemio Navarrete, Damaso Gallegos, and Rafael Dominguez all used 980 silver. Since there is no maker’s mark, we cannot be sure if this is the work of one of the well-known masters of Taxco. There were other silver maestros who used 980 silver, but these silversmiths used it more often than not. For your reference, Billie Hougart explains the history of Mexican hallmarks in the book, The Little Book of Mexican Silver Trade and Hallmarks, (2006 edition). The fact that this mark is deeply impressed in a large square along with the premium silver content indicates that it was an early work of a highly skilled Mexican silver master. It is circa 1920-1930’s. Beginning in the 1920's, the silver artisans of Mexico rose to a new definition of perfection in design and craftsmanship as the result of the strong influence and patronage of William Spratling, a talented architect and designer who engendered a city of tallers and jewelers in Taxco during that time. This brooch is the result of the renaissance that emanated from Taxco and flourished from the 1920's-1960's in several cities in Mexico. This opulent design features superbly bezel-set amethyst gemstones surrounded by delicate silver flourishes and small silver domes. The stones in this incomparable bracelet are fine examples of deep purple amethyst that varies from solid purple to morsels of lavender. The quality and coloration of amethyst are some of the finest examples I have seen in the old works of Taxco, which gives it further charm and conviction of a rare and extraordinary example of the craftsmanship of old Mexican masters of the first half of the 20th century. It weighs a hefts 69.8 grams, is 7-1/2” wearable length and is 1-1/4” wide. It measures 8” length overall. Each of the seven panels are expertly crafted and hinged with perfectly articulating pin hinges. The back is smooth and unblemished. This matchless bracelet is still in perfect vintage condition except for a tiny chip on one of the carved stones. I had to look for it with a loop and missed it on my first few examinations. It is definitely indiscernible and I only mention it to be completely honest and forthcoming in my description. This distinctive and colossal bracelet is simply awesome and one you will want if you appreciate first-class wearable art.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1960 item #1177377 (stock #01185621gjs)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
$350.00
This old piece is lavishly carved with a stylized dragon on both sides of the pendant. It is set off with a gorgeous brilliant turquoise cabochon, bezel set and heavily carved on the silver back. The piece is quite old, probably from the 1950's or '60's and shows that it has been worn because of the smoothness of the edges on the back of the pendant. It is quite a unique piece and I added a fancy chain because it just seemed to fit the character of the piece.The chain is 24" long and is marked, "sterling" and I believe it is from Italy, The pendant measures a little over 2" diameter with another 1-1/4" for the bail. It is a lovely piece.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1940 item #963214 (stock #06700e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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VINTAGE MASSIVE FIERY RED MEXICAN DECO BRACELET-1948 This massive fiery red vintage Art Deco Mexican bracelet is big and bold with 6 brilliant red inlays atop each link. Certainly the intensity of the red color, the immense size, and the absolute perfect execution of the design make this one of the most voluptuous examples of old silver artistry I have ever seen. There is no passing this prize without covetous looks. The design and craftsmanship on this handsome piece is superb – a true work of art. There are 3 rectilinear red convex “stones”, and 3 smaller, carved Aztec masks perched on top of 8 domes, while the larger links are decorated with tiny, curved, scrolling wire and silver balls along the top and bottom. The center of each of the larger stones is also inset with horizontal silver wires. The hallmark on the back is a pre-Eagle, which dates this piece to 1930's or early 40's. It is marked, “Sterling, Hecho en Mexico DF” and in the center, “925”. (Part of this was double-stamped and is now worn, so it’s hard to make out, but I believe these are the correct markings.) It measures slightly over 7-1/4” wearable length, is 1-1/2” wide, and weighs an impressive 72.7 grams. This bracelet is the result of the renaissance that emanated from Taxco and flourished from the 1920's-1960's in several cities throughout Mexico. Beginning in the 1920's, the silver artisans of Mexico rose to a new definition of perfection in design and craftsmanship as the result of the strong influence and patronage of William Spratling, a talented architect and designer who engendered a city of tallers and jewelers in Taxco during that time. Mexico City also had a rich history of early tallers. The clasp works perfectly with a positive “snap”. There are a few very tiny marks on the small silver balls and on one dome, but I can see no material damages. The bracelet is in beautiful near perfect, excellent vintage condition. This is a fabulous piece of Mexican artistry and an unrivaled find for any collector.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1970 item #1063391 (stock #001194mw)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This old tribal chain is terminated by an unusual pendant, a Lingam or Shivadhara, and has story behind it. These necklaces were designed as containers to hold a sacred lingam stone representing the god Shiva. Lingayats are a Hindu group who believe that Shiva is the only diety, rather than the the 3 gods revered by other Hindus. They also believed that the sacred presence of Shiva was not simply confined to the temple, but that it could be held in these necklaces for personal connection to the god. The necklaces were often worn over the should to one side, or hanging from the neck as a standard necklace. The indigenous people of India have handcrafted beautiful silver jewelry for centuries. They still use hand wrought methods as their predecessors did hundreds of years prior. This necklace is sterling. The chain measures 24" long, and the overall length including the ornament is 25-1/2". The ornament is approximately 2 X 2 X 2". It weighs 57.9 grams. With its unusual heritage, this is quite a conversation piece, is circa early 1900's, and is in good vintage condition.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1950 item #954220 (stock #0100e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This Art Deco Sterling silver repousse bracelet is an extraordinary example of the fine workmanship from the hands of Mexican silver maestro, Alfredo Villasana. It depicts two large spirals on each side of the clamper, that meet in the center. The design is sculptural and graphic and shows the incredible talent and skill of Villasana. The spirals are deeply repoussed accented with dark patina. The spirals overlap the rest of the design which looks like overlapping feathers. It is a remarkable piece of art that demonstrates the highest level of Mexican silver artistry. The bracelet measures 3-1/4" across the front, tapering to 1-3/8" at the hinge. The interior circumference is 7" in a closed position. It is marked with Alfredo Villasana’s initials, "AV, TAXCO, HECHO EN MEXICO, 925 Sterling”. The lack of the Eagle assay mark dates this piece pre-1948. It weighs 63.6 grams. Villasana worked for William Spratling and Hector Aguilar before working on his own, and became well-known as one of the great Taxco silversmiths and best recognized for his repousse work and especially clamper bracelets. The process of repousse is produced by tracing a design on a piece of silver sheet and laying it on a hot bowl of tar. The artist then tamps the reverse design into the tar by using a variety of hammers, dampers, chasing tools, and other hand tools. It is a very laborious and tedious process and takes many hours and days to complete a piece. Beginning in the 1930's, the silver artisans of Mexico rose to a new definition of perfection in design and craftsmanship as the result of the strong influence and patronage of William Spratling, a talented architect and designer who engendered a city of tallers and jewelers in Taxco during that time. Alfredo Villasana was a prominent part of that renaissance that emanated from Taxco and flourished from the 1930's-1960's in several cities in Mexico. This bracelet is in excellent condition with minor scratches and a couple of very small dings consistent with a piece of this vintage.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1960 item #954796 (stock #03300e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This exquisite sterling silver bracelet is a spectacular work of art made by tribal artisan from Rajasthan, India. It is finely detailed with flowerettes, scrolls, chevrons, and silver rope, and, of course, huge turquoise stones accented with coral. All stones are bezel-set and the turquoise bezels have tiny chevrons around them. The amount of craftsmanship and attention to detail in this piece is phenomenal. I have never seen one this highly decorated. It is very large and quite heavy weighing 129 grams. It measures approximately 7" inside tip-to-tip, and the opening is about 3/4" wide. It is 3" wide at the widest point across the top vertically, tapering down to 1" at each end. It is really a masterpiece of fine silver design and craftsmanship. It could be worn by a man or a woman. This is an incredible piece and a real treasure.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1960 item #1005763 (stock #011400e)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This ponderous bracelet is simply spectacular and is crafted from the highest 980 grade silver, which is close to being pure silver. This elegant piece is in superb condition and has an impressively large green onyx or glass stone – an expertly-carved cabochon as the centerpiece. On either side are two massive hinged silver pieces that form the rest of the cuff. These panels are completely covered with a variety of silver domes and silver rope flourishes. The hinges themselves are masterful creations of tiny tightly wound silver wire, and the clasp is a tongue-in-box closure that snaps definitively. It weighs a hefty 64.4 grams, is 7-1/2” inside length. The center panel measures 2” wide X 2-3/8” tall, and the two side panels measure 1-3/4” tall X 2-34” long and taper to ¾” tall at the clasp. This stunning hinged cuff was designed and crafted in Iguala, Mexico by an artist who signed his work, “MOC”. It is marked, “Iguala, Gro, MOC” and has an Eagle 3 Mexican Assay mark. In addition, it is marked “Plata 925 Mexico”. Iguala is a small town very close to Taxco and many of the early silversmiths came from there. This artist is mentioned in Billie Hougart’s. “The Little Book of Mexican Silver Trade and Hallmarks”, (2006 edition). It is circa 1950’s. Another thorough reference of the history of great Mexican silver masters is Penny Morrill and Carole Berk’s book,” Mexican Silver”. Beginning in the 1920's, the silver artisans of Mexico rose to a new definition of perfection in design and craftsmanship as the result of the strong influence and patronage of William Spratling, a talented architect and designer who engendered a city of tallers and jewelers in Taxco during that time. This brooch is the result of the renaissance that emanated from Taxco and flourished from the 1920's-1960's in several cities in Mexico. Each of the three panels is expertly crafted and hinged with perfectly articulating wound wire hinges. The back is smooth and unblemished. This matchless bracelet is still in perfect vintage condition and is one you will want if you appreciate first-class wearable art.
All Items : Archives : Estate Jewelry : Pre 1940 item #1011137 (stock #001124E)
Taxco Treasures Jewelry + Artifacts
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This vintage Mexican sterling silver bracelet is a Concho style created by a highly skilled silversmith from Mexico City. The design is like one done by ProSA The hallmark on the back is a pre-Eagle, which dates this piece to the 1930's or early 40's. The rare design and impeccable craftsmanship makes this a highly desirable and collectible piece. The links are Concho shapes that have been repoussed to give dimension and incised with delicate detail on each “ray” around each red stone. At the base of this shape is silver rope surrounding the domes. The Concho shapes are mounted on other cut out shapes that are embellished with flowerettes at each corner. The links are joined by wide, flat silver jump rings, and the clasp is a simple hook like the jump rings. The red stone may be coral or something else. I’m not sure. Extraordinary is the word that comes to mind to express the multiple facets of design, craftsmanship, and artistic aesthetic this bracelet engenders. The five links measures 7-3/4 inches in length and 1-1/8 inch wide at the widest point, and it weighs 31.3 grams. The hallmark reads “0.925, Hecho en Mexico” around the outside, and “VGV” in the center. Part of the outside circle markings are worn, but most likely read, “DF” because this artist was in Mexico City. This hallmark is noted in "The Little Book of Mexican Silver Trade and Hallmarks" by Billy Hougart. It is an exceptional piece of craftsmanship and detail. I can see no damage whatsoever to this fabulous bracelet, and have never seen another one like it. This bracelet is a tremendous find for any collector.