Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1910 item #1233407 (stock #12-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
From China’s Shaanxi Province, known for its many types of marvelous dumplings, this late Qing woven reed basket opens clamshell fashion to form two large serving bowls. Wide bent willow bands painted with flowers and secured to the basketry with metal studs encircle the top and bottom sections. A metal hasp in the front is used to keep the top and bottom closed, and a metal ring in the back is used to keep the two sections attached when they are used as bowls...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #910169 (stock #27-56)
Silk Road Gallery
$300.00
A silver belt from the Republic of Georgia is made of 30 separate rectangular segments covering leather. The embossed Victorian-look design is similar to sketches in “Ethnography of Georgia” by Nino Brailashvili, Khelovneba Publishing, Tbilisi, 1990, illustration 139. The book describes the work done by Georgian artisans in numerous silver and gold workshops that once were concentrated along one narrow street in Tbilisi. Silver content on this piece is 37 percent...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #943598 (stock #57-44)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This fantastic composite creature, a “tadiya yupa,” with features of a lion, goat, bird and serpent, once stood as a good omen in a Buddhist temple in Burma. Often referred to as brave lions, such friendly/fierce chimera figures are much loved in Burma, appearing in temple art and on personal items such as medicine and betel boxes. They are regarded both as protectors and as dispensers of good fortune. This one is particularly impressive because of its size and detailing...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #361914 (stock #15-80)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
A boat on a silvery sea and a superbly detailed phoenix hovering over green mountains are repeated in shades of green and brown on a cream background in this silk Meiji-era Japanese obi. The maru obi, appropriate attire in Japan for formal occasions, usually is made of elaborately patterned silk brocade or tapestry. One of several types of fabric belts worn with kimono, the maru style is made of a single long, wide length of material folded over a stiff lining and sewn along one side...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Stoneware : Pre 1837 VR item #784126 (stock #33-54)
Silk Road Gallery
$375.00
An 18th century Chinese oil pitcher has a thick glaze decorated with blue calligraphy done in the loose, free "wet brush" manner. Collected for its spontaneity of design, Swatow ware with this type of calligraphy was made in South China and exported from the port of Swatow to countries throughout Southeast Asia. The cursive characters were applied with a very wet brush, depositing heavier, darker color at the ends of the strokes...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #894706 (stock #63-51)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
These lacquered wood figures of Buddha and five monks are from Burma, where they are displayed to commemorate Dhama Sakya, or First Sermon Day, in honor of what is believed to have been the Buddha’s initial teaching following enlightenment. The important event is celebrated annually on the fourth day of the sixth month of the Buddhist calendar, which falls sometime in June or July...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #875350 (stock #62-53)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An early 20th century Chinese offering basket is affixed to a bamboo pedestal encircled with ink sketches of flowers representing the four seasons. The inside bottom of the tray is centered with a sauvastika, a Buddhist icon resembling a swastika but with the crampons turned to the left. Though the ancient Sanskrit symbol may have come to China as an auspicious Buddhist sign, it since has become a largely ornamental symbol of good fortune and can be seen in carpets, embroidery and carvings...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #782459 (stock #52-15)
Silk Road Gallery
$530.00
A silk collar from the late Qing Dynasty is made of six embroidered lappets shaped to resemble clouds. Cloud icons, evolved from archaic pictographs, have been used in Chinese art for thousands of years to symbolize abundance and the nourishment of life. This collar was worn on festival days by a young girl whose mother designed and embroidered it with six auspicious flowers and six auspicious insects to convey added good wishes for her daughter's future...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Architectural Elements : Pre 1900 item #259258 (stock #58-38)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
This 19th century Chinese carved wood architectural panel, once part of a large, richly decorated canopied marriage bed, has been fitted with a mirror. The gilded carvings of a bat and two fish on the lower part of the panel are examples of the use in China during the Qing Dynasty of symbols derived from homonyms to convey important wishes for the future...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #757166 (stock #08-03)
Silk Road Gallery
$375.00
A modest little folk Buddha with right hand in earth touching mudra sits on a red and black double lotus throne. Made of lacquered teak wood, the carving is from the Shan minority in Burma. The gilded Buddha has the downcast eyes, prominent brow, small chin and large finial generally seen on Shan figures...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #903490 (stock #57-38)
Silk Road Gallery
$975.00
A Mon Buddha from 18th century Burma has the distinctive facial features and very high finial that identify Mon images from the Ava period. The waisted throne is edged with geometric decorations typical of Mon images of the era. We purchased this figure about 20 years ago in Burma from a dealer whose collection included mostly 19th century Shan images...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Wood : Pre 1900 item #332092 (stock #56-19)
Silk Road Gallery
$295.00
Beautifully designed and constructed of curved wood staves with a wrapped bamboo handle, this lidded container was used to carry tools needed by lamp lighters on their rounds. Five bands of ornamental carving encircle the basket. The lid is centered with a round carving representing the four points of the compass, and the base is carved with a diaper pattern in key design...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #998093 (stock #12-89)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This medicine Buddha from early 20th century Burma holds the healing fruit of the myrobalan tree in the right hand with the palm extended upward over the right knee. The left hand rests in meditation, palm upward in the lap, without the begging bowl often included in medicine Buddha figures. Variations in medicine Buddha forms may be seen throughout Asia, particularly in Burma, where the elliptical myrobalan fruit sometimes is offered from the right hand of a standing rather than sitting Buddha....
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #876853 (stock #58-78)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century Chinese box made for storing small teacups, this piece is an example of an everyday utilitarian object with design and workmanship that stands the test of time. The box is constructed of shaped wood staves fitted together in barrel fashion and secured top and bottom with brass bands. The lid is in two parts, with the back half affixed and the front half removable so that the stacked cups were secure but easily taken out of the container. The box is lacquered in dark red and t...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #678034 (stock #63-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$595.00
Seated in lotus position, this early 20th century bronze Burmese Buddha has classic Ava features. The right hand is in bhumisparsa mudra (earth touching, centering), the robe is quite simple, the face triangular with small upturned mouth and the head is topped with an onion-shaped finial--all Ava attributes. Unlike the more ornate double lotus throne seen on many Ava figures, however, this Buddha of later vintage sits on a plain waisted throne. The relatively small size and simplicity of the thr...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1910 item #774625 (stock #38-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Cherry-red blossoms cover this woven silk summer obi from late Meiji era Japan. Silver leaves and centers on the flowers give depth to the tapestry-like weave. Hitoe (meaning single layer) obi were unlined, lighter and brighter than more formal obi styles. On this one, the fabric is folded back over about one-third of the length of the obi so the reverse side of the weave did not show when the obi was tied. Old obi make handsome bed throws, table runners and other decorative accent pieces. This ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1900 item #900790 (stock #37-38)
Silk Road Gallery
$595.00
This large jar from China’s late Qing Dynasty has a heavy cream-colored glaze as background for a design of peonies outlined in chocolate brown. Peony petals are touched with subtle blue/brown shading. The jar, though it is in the style of Chizhou (Tz’u-chou) pottery of the much earlier Northern Song period (960-1127AD), was produced in the mid to late 19th century, reflecting the common practice of Chinese artisans to copy techniques and styles of ancient dynasties in honor and admiration o...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Scholar Art : Pre 1837 VR item #902690 (stock #38-56)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
An early 18th century inkstone has a gourd-shaped ink pool cut into a deep black stone slab that, along with brushes, ink and paper, represented what was referred to in Chinese literature as “the four precious things of the library.” Among the four objects, inkstones were considered the most important, the soul of the scholar’s library, because they were said to represent “the infinite subtlety of nature.” Although they appear to be relatively humble objects, inkstones were praised, co...