Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1837 VR item #894121 (stock #07-61)
Silk Road Gallery
$890.00
A merchant’s money box, or zeni-bako, from Japan’s Edo Period carries an inscription that reads, “Purchased one lucky day in November in the 12th year of Bunsei,” which was 1829. The small copper coins in use at that time were called “zeni” and led to the development of simple, strong boxes for merchants to store coins during the business day. This box is made of thick keyaki wood and fitted with an iron lock and hasp...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1910 item #946568 (stock #04-01)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This Japanese ceramic hibachi from the late Meiji Period (1868-1912) has a country scene—a rustic dwelling snuggled amid old trees, hills and distant mountains. Ceramic hibachi were introduced in Meiji times as portable alternatives to the larger copper-lined wood hibachi and the heavier bronze receptacles. Whether ceramic or metal, hibachi held glowing charcoal embers used as a source of heat during cold Japanese winters...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #805132 (stock #18-46)
Silk Road Gallery
$890.00
Salvaged from a Japanese ryokan (inn), this late Meiji blue and white ceramic benki moves easily to a second life as a handsome plant holder or fountain. Western expatriates in the Far East, particularly in Japan, have a long history of adapting utilitarian items with appealing Asian design to inventive new uses, and this is one of the most unusual items to be adapted...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Earthenware : Pre 1900 item #139278 (stock #58-33)
Silk Road Gallery
$400.00
From the latter half of Japan's Edo Period (1614-1868), this jug has the imperfect, humble, elusive Japanese beauty called wabi-sabi. The bottle invites touch with its natural variations in texture and color. Its glaze is marked with the flaws caused by ashes from the burned wood of the kiln, and no attempt was made to smooth the ridges and dents that occurred as the clay was shaped...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1910 item #168849 (stock #08-45)
Silk Road Gallery
$650.00
Sliding reed doors such as these late Meiji Period fusuma were used in Japan during the hot summer months to replace shoji screens and solid doors. The reeds allowed cooling breezes to circulate yet afforded privacy. On these doors, the reeds are carefully arranged so the darker areas form a wave pattern. They are held in place by horizontal strips of bamboo on one side and kiri wood on the other. The frame and top portion of the doors are made of light-weight kiri wood...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1920 item #594452 (stock #09-10)
Silk Road Gallery
$2,200.00
This Japanese silk uchikake, or outer kimono, from the late Meiji Period has the effect of a dramatic painting, with gold clouds floating among sumptuous blooms spilling from a wheeled cart. Strong shades of blue, red and green are contrasted with delicate pastel flowering branches against a black silk faille background. Several Japanese textile techniques are used to achieve the spectacular effect...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1910 item #763043 (stock #18-20)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
The phoenix, emblem of peace, shimmers in shades of yellow, blue and purple on both sides of this Meiji era silk obi. A background pattern in cream and brown provides a counterpoint to the colorful birds and flowers. This is a "hitoe" obi, which means it is woven and unlined, meant to be worn during the hot Japanese summers. Hitoe obi were made in varying widths and lengths and in either single or double layers...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #842368 (stock #09-08)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
An early 20th century plate from Arita in Japan’s southern island of Kyushu has a vivid underglaze cobalt and white scene of a rugged coastline. Gnarled pine trees overhang a house nestled below a steep cliff. A boatman can be seen nearing the shore. At the base of the pine trees, a cobalt stamp with the characters “HI” (pronounced “he”) is integrated into the scene to identify the maker of this piece. The plate is in pristine condition. Dimensions: diameter 12 ¼” (31 cm)...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #361914 (stock #15-80)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
A boat on a silvery sea and a superbly detailed phoenix hovering over green mountains are repeated in shades of green and brown on a cream background in this silk Meiji-era Japanese obi. The maru obi, appropriate attire in Japan for formal occasions, usually is made of elaborately patterned silk brocade or tapestry. One of several types of fabric belts worn with kimono, the maru style is made of a single long, wide length of material folded over a stiff lining and sewn along one side...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1910 item #774625 (stock #38-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Cherry-red blossoms cover this woven silk summer obi from late Meiji era Japan. Silver leaves and centers on the flowers give depth to the tapestry-like weave. Hitoe (meaning single layer) obi were unlined, lighter and brighter than more formal obi styles. On this one, the fabric is folded back over about one-third of the length of the obi so the reverse side of the weave did not show when the obi was tied. Old obi make handsome bed throws, table runners and other decorative accent pieces...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1910 item #714985 (stock #53-13)
Silk Road Gallery
$380.00
An intricate pattern of blue, silver and gold gives this early 20th century Japanese silk obi the look of old French tapestry. Both the colors and design are somewhat unusual for Japanese kimono belts, or obi, which typically have larger patterns and bolder palettes. Although metallic silver and gold threads were used for this obi, the shine was muted by the type of weave so that they have only a subtle gleam in direct light. This is a fukuro obi, meaning that it has the tapestry design woven on...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1910 item #767712 (stock #15-82)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
A silk brocade maru obi from Japan's late Meiji Period is covered along both sides of its nearly 13-foot length with fans, each one decorated with flowers and leaves of symbolic significance. The green silk has the soft, lustrous surface that gives antique obi their unique appeal. Brocaded on the fans, adding touches of silver, rust, dark green and light green on the medium green background, are plum blossoms, pine needles, bamboo stalks and fall leaves, all associated with the seasons and long ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1910 item #914262 (stock #62-26)
Silk Road Gallery
$560.00
This Meiji era ranma, an interior transom, was an integral part of the architecture of an old Japanese frame house. Within those houses, moveable partitions of wide sliding doors (fusuma) were used to define rooms, allowing the flexible use of space. The ranma was suspended above the fusuma to fill a gap between the tops of the doors and the ceiling. Pierced carvings on these wood transoms facilitated circulation of air and light throughout the house as well as adding a decorative element. Carve...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #912459 (stock #07-53)
Silk Road Gallery
$390.00
Sake dispensed from this large ceramic cask served late 19th century patrons in Saga Prefecture on Japan’s south island of Kyushu. The turquoise logo of a path between two wooded hills shows the cask held Seiryu Sake. The other side of the cask proclaims the name of the sake shop, Murata Saketen, and its address. The Kanji, in vivid underglaze cobalt with the splash of turquoise, and the design, rice stalks in relief extending up two sides of the container, make this an unusual and especially...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1910 item #260501 (stock #09-19)
Silk Road Gallery
$390.00
The spirit of old Japan lives on in its wonderful antique utilitarian items such as this ceramic sake keg. From the late Meiji Period, it has an underglaze of vivid cobalt blue. The strong, stylized characters on the front give the trade name of the sake. This jug is identical to one pictured in "Japanese Antiques" by Patricia Salmon, Art International Publishers, Tokyo, page 51. As shown in that photograph, it originally had a wrapped bamboo handle that looped through the two lugs on the top. T...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1910 item #931787 (stock #54-08)
Silk Road Gallery
$425.00
A Japanese obi has the look of a pointillist painting in green, cranberry, peach and yellow. Brocade weaving of small brilliant dots creates the ceremonial court attire worn by officials during Japan’s Heian Period, with colorful robes and the distinctive high black hats of the era. Lustrous silk dots form the imperial setting on a taupe background. This is a fukuro style obi, meaning that the design fully covers one side of the long obi, and on the reverse side, the brocade pattern is used ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #807056 (stock #37-98)
Silk Road Gallery
$495.00
The striking underglaze blue and white design of this late 19th century Japanese fukizima charger combines both vivid and muted cobalt in misty blossoms and leaves that float within sharply defined stems. The fukizima technique, employing a stencil and sprayed pigment, created the white flowers that hover above a soft blue background. The igezara fluted trim is in perfect condition; there is a small firing flaw to the lower right of the design. The diameter is 15" (38 cm). SEE MORE ITEMS IN OUR...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1910 item #818776 (stock #32-52)
Silk Road Gallery
$195.00
Shibori, an incredibly intricate Japanese textile art, was used to create the mon (family crest) on one side and good fortune character on the other side of this late Meiji era fukusa. The designs were formed by tightly tying off with thread thousands of individual tiny sections on plain white silk. The tied off sections covered the surface everywhere except the outlines of the character and crest, so that when the fabric was dyed green and the binding threads removed, each tiny section was puck...