Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1910 item #168849 (stock #08-45)
Silk Road Gallery
$650.00
Sliding reed doors such as these late Meiji Period fusuma were used in Japan during the hot summer months to replace shoji screens and solid doors. The reeds allowed cooling breezes to circulate yet afforded privacy. On these doors, the reeds are carefully arranged so the darker areas form a wave pattern. They are held in place by horizontal strips of bamboo on one side and kiri wood on the other. The frame and top portion of the doors are made of light-weight kiri wood...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1910 item #914262 (stock #62-26)
Silk Road Gallery
$560.00
This Meiji era ranma, an interior transom, was an integral part of the architecture of an old Japanese frame house. Within those houses, moveable partitions of wide sliding doors (fusuma) were used to define rooms, allowing the flexible use of space. The ranma was suspended above the fusuma to fill a gap between the tops of the doors and the ceiling. Pierced carvings on these wood transoms facilitated circulation of air and light throughout the house as well as adding a decorative element...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1837 VR item #894121 (stock #07-61)
Silk Road Gallery
$890.00
A merchant’s money box, or zeni-bako, from Japan’s Edo Period carries an inscription that reads, “Purchased one lucky day in November in the 12th year of Bunsei,” which was 1829. The small copper coins in use at that time were called “zeni” and led to the development of simple, strong boxes for merchants to store coins during the business day. This box is made of thick keyaki wood and fitted with an iron lock and hasp...