Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1837 VR item #396830 (stock #39-38)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
Shimmering gold and blue tiles represent scales on this 200-year-old naga (sea dragon) that stands 50 inches (127 cm) tall. Used in Thailand as temple roof finials or in pairs at entrances to guard against evil spirits and natural disasters, the powerful, mystical naga are among the most revered Buddhist symbols. With its soaring, curving form and large size this particular naga is especially sculptural...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #191478 (stock #41-10)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This is a museum-quality 16th century bronze Ava Buddha with a dedication inscription on the back of the high stepped throne. The bronze has aged to a wonderful black patina, and remaining gold leaf on the finely modeled figure and throne adds richness. The face has sweeping brows and well executed eyes. The high usnisha is topped with a narrow lotus bud finial. The Buddha sits in interlocking lotus position with the bottoms of both feet prominently displayed...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1910 item #786538 (stock #10-40)
Silk Road Gallery
$790.00
This bronze Buddha, with attributes true to Burma's late Ava period of the 1600s, was cast a few hundred years later in the late 19th/early 20th century. It was common practice for Burmese artisans of later periods to copy styles that originated much earlier, sometimes mixing attributes from several periods and regions. In this beautifully cast handsome Buddha, the form follows the Ava look in all respects...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #788418 (stock #64-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An elephant with raised trunk, symbol of hospitality, forms the handle of this carved teakwood Burmese rice scoop. The dark red lacquer, applied over black lacquer in the traditional manner of Burmese artisans, is worn so the black undercoat shows through in areas, giving this early 20th century piece an inviting patina. The elephant trunk, which forms the scoop handle, is especially worn and shows evidence of many years of use...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #936671 (stock #41-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,800.00
A dolomite plaque carved with the eight great scenes in the life of Buddha dates to the early 16th century during Burma’s Ava Period (1364 -1752 A.D). Plaques from as early as 700 A.D. depicting these eight events have been unearthed in Burma, and during the Pagan Period (1084-1287 A.D.) carved tablets representing the eight episodes became prevalent...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #687835 (stock #64-37)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
Finely modeled scenes from the "Jataka," stories of important events in the life of the Buddha, cover the lid and three sides of this "sadaik," or manuscript chest, from a Burmese monastery...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1900 item #913678 (stock #57-21)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This large carved teak kinnari, mythical half man/half bird creature, surrounded by curving foliage was the equivalent of a hood ornament when it was perched on a two-wheeled bullock cart in 19th century Burma. With its chest thrust forward and head, wings and tail swept back, the kinnari gives the impression of speed. Kinnari and the female counterpart, kinnara, were favorite icons in the Burmese pantheon of fantastic mythical creatures...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #978464 (stock #31-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This bronze leogryph figure with human face is from early 20th century Burma and is a variation of the Buddhist temple guardian called manok-thi-ha or manushi, names derived from the Sanskrit words for man (manu) and lion (simha). Burmese manok-thi-ha often have double rear quarters (two bums—see our catalog item 63-37). This one is single-bummed and outfitted with heavy necklace, chest ornament and lots of swirls...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #284166 (stock #08-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Seated on a faded red lacquer throne, this little Buddha is a humble, quiet figure. With shallow carving that suggests rather than sharply defines the facial features, the smooth oval face takes on an enigmatic, ethereal look. The small body is compactly folded to fit precisely on the narrow throne, giving the impression that the figure is conserving space. Fingers on the right hand, in earth touching mudra, are exceptionally long...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1492 item #724257 (stock #62-48)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
This well preserved tablet dating to the 11th century is a terracotta image of Buddha seated in bhumisparsa, or earth-touching position, within an arched niche under a tree. The tree possibly represents the bodhi tree where Buddha attained enlightenment. Relics such as this have been recovered from under stupa throughout Burma. Small clay votive plaques were first introduced in neighboring India as mementos for pilgrims visiting Buddhist sites...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #279346 (stock #08-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$675.00
Elements of folk art blended with features of a classical Burmese Buddha give great charm to this unusual 18th century lacquered and gilded wood figure. The face is finely carved and serene, with well defined brows, downcast eyes and expressive lips. The ears, angled nearly straight out with jaunty flying lobes, and the exaggerated, very high finial are areas where the carver departed tradition in expression, perhaps, of his own personal image of the Buddha...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #894706 (stock #63-51)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
These lacquered wood figures of Buddha and five monks are from Burma, where they are displayed to commemorate Dhama Sakya, or First Sermon Day, in honor of what is believed to have been the Buddha’s initial teaching following enlightenment. The important event is celebrated annually on the fourth day of the sixth month of the Buddhist calendar, which falls sometime in June or July. In the tableau, the Buddha, after just achieving enlightenment, meets five ascetics at the town of Saranath, nea...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #799411 (stock #57-43)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,700.00
Traces of gold leaf remain on this Pagan dry lacquer Buddha head from the late 1700s. The head rests on a contemporary removable black metal stand. The dry lacquer technique, used by Burmese artisans from the mid-18th century until the beginning of the 20th century, produced finely modeled hollow images that were light in weight but very strong. The labor-intensive method involved a number of steps. First the image was shaped from clay, then wrapped in a lacquer-soaked cloth. A pliable mixture ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1837 VR item #1250809 (stock #06-84)
Silk Road Gallery
$320.00
pair
These teak hangers are from Solo on the Indonesian island of Java and date to the early 19th century. Painted carvings of Hanuman, the heroic white monkey from the Southeast Asian epic, “The Ramayana,” sit atop long curved tails that form textile hangers. Fabrics can be draped so the Hanuman figures face front or to the sides. The hangers have holes at the top end so they can be either suspended or affixed directly to a wall. (See a similar set of hangers with different carved figures by ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #898500 (stock #63-30)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century lacquer betel box from Burma is incised in an intricate pattern called “yok-thei,” with tiny dancers swirling through vegetal scrolling. The small design, primarily red and green, is punctuated with black and green circles that look like launching pads for the flying stylized dancers. (For a betel box with a similar yok-thei pattern, see color plate # 41 in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994.) This is one of the more...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #265851 (stock #10-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$300.00
One of the most exotic sculptural forms in Southeast Asia, the naga, a sea dragon with a high curving spire, is seen at temple entrances an on roofs. This 19th century carved teak wood naga was once a finial on a temple roof in Thailand. The mythical serpent is said to have protected the Buddha from lightning as he sat meditating under a bodhi tree and so is used to guard against evil spirits, particularly natural disasters. When in use at temples, the sculptures generally are covered in colorfu...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #780643 (stock #12-42)
Silk Road Gallery
$250.00
Tiny yellow dots incised freehand into a black lacquer background cover this small early 20th Burmese box. The design, produced with a time-consuming technique called "yun," is one of the more subtle traditional yun patterns developed by Burmese lacquer artisans. Yun involves the use of a stylus to engrave designs, one color at a time, on a lacquer surface. The yellow, red and green patterns on this box required three separate sessions of engraving with the stylus, rubbing the color into the inc...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #850952 (stock #64-08)
Silk Road Gallery
$330.00
This late 19th century bronze bell is cast in same design as the huge bells that are prominent features outside Buddhist temples and monasteries throughout Burma. It hangs from a metal crossbar that also supports a U-shaped handle flanked with “to-naya” (snake-like dragons) that match those on the bell hanger. Unlike the huge bells that weigh a ton or more and are struck on the outside with a large wooden mallet, this bell has a clapper that, despite its smaller size, produces a rich and son...