Asian Antiques by Silk Road
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #891192 (stock #64-44)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
This late 19th century offering vessel from the Burmese city of Pagan is an exceptionally fine example of the hsun-ok containers used to carry food offerings to Buddhist monasteries and temples. It is made of wood covered with many coats of lacquer, black first and then top layers of rich deep red. As the red lacquer wears away in areas exposing the black, a handsome negoro effect is created...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #279346 (stock #08-14)
Silk Road Gallery
$675.00
Elements of folk art blended with features of a classical Burmese Buddha give great charm to this unusual 18th century lacquered and gilded wood figure. The face is finely carved and serene, with well defined brows, downcast eyes and expressive lips. The ears, angled nearly straight out with jaunty flying lobes, and the exaggerated, very high finial are areas where the carver departed tradition in expression, perhaps, of his own personal image of the Buddha...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #882005 (stock #63-13)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
This very large lacquer tray from the Shan minority people in northeast Burma has four different patterns of basketry weaving showing through the rich persimmon-colored lacquer. Called byat, such handmade trays, used for serving food, were time-consuming to produce. Following the weaving process, each of the many successive applications of lacquer required several days of drying, then burnishing before the next coat of lacquer was applied...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1837 VR item #396830 (stock #39-38)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,200.00
Shimmering gold and blue tiles represent scales on this 200-year-old naga (sea dragon) that stands 50 inches (127 cm) tall. Used in Thailand as temple roof finials or in pairs at entrances to guard against evil spirits and natural disasters, the powerful, mystical naga are among the most revered Buddhist symbols. With its soaring, curving form and large size this particular naga is especially sculptural...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #929783 (stock #63-14)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An especially handsome lacquer bowl, called a “kwet,” is from the Shan people, a southeast Asian tribal group living primarily in northeast Burma...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #266405 (stock #57-62)
Silk Road Gallery
$450.00
Elegantly executed designs in red, yellow and green on a black background decorate this 19th century Burmese lacquer box. Called a "bi-it," this beautifully crafted container held combs, oil, perfume and sandalwood powder. The unusual scene on the lid shows a man and woman walking among trees collecting fruit. Their multi-patterned traditional clothing is drawn in great detail...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Wood : Pre 1800 item #291897 (stock #02-34)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
Inscriptions cover the left and back sides of the throne under this 18th century seated Burmese Shan Buddha. Made of lacquered wood coated with gilt, the figure is graceful and well proportioned, with a finely carved face. Long, tilted eyes under high eyebrows that sweep upward toward the hairline are the most arresting features of the peaceful face, which is smoothly capped in dark lacquer and topped with an exceptionally tall finial...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1910 item #1222465 (stock #63-84)
Silk Road Gallery
$890.00
This teak sculpture, more than three feet tall, represents a supernatural character from ancient Burmese folklore, Zaw-gyi, who is said to possess a fantastic range of powers. Zaw-gyi is immortal, forever youthful, can fly and practices alchemy, to name just a few of his talents. He lives in solitude and strives for spiritual perfection...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #877672 (stock #63-04)
Silk Road Gallery
$800.00
This mid-19th century wood offering bowl is from Pagan, an area recognized for producing the finest lacquer items in Burma. Many layers of black lacquer cover the wood base and are topped with a lacquer mixed with cinnabar pigment. These outer red layers have worn away in many places, showing the black lacquer underneath and creating an attractive patina...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1700 item #699949 (stock #25-64)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,100.00
This Ava Period (1287-1752) limestone Buddha head was found in Burma in the mid-1990s. It obviously was cut from a stone backslab, indicating an early to mid Ava timeframe since the use of backslabs, prevalent during the earlier Pagan Period, declined during the late Ava years. The Buddha has a wide, squarish face, prominent eyebrows, well modeled lips and smooth cap, all Ava attributes...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1239618 (stock #63-26)
Silk Road Gallery
$500.00
This cinnabar-colored four-piece lacquer box from late 19th century Burma has intricate designs incised in fine black lines on its hatbox-style lid, high-sided container and two trays. The tortoise shell design is interspersed with small circles, and the lid top is centered with a gold-accented drawing of a character in native dress...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #888007 (stock #02-65)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A two-part silver box in the traditional Khmer motif of a singha, a mythical lion, is covered with swirling lines simulating fur, and has a fat pouf of a tail swung up over its broad back. Though it has the open jaw and flattened ears of a protector, its aura is more friendly than fierce. With a weight of 538 grams, this box is relatively large compared with other such boxes in the genre of handmade Khmer silver pieces found in the shapes of myriad birds and animals...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1800 item #936671 (stock #41-17)
Silk Road Gallery
$1,800.00
A dolomite plaque carved with the eight great scenes in the life of Buddha dates to the early 16th century during Burma’s Ava Period (1364 -1752 A.D). Plaques from as early as 700 A.D. depicting these eight events have been unearthed in Burma, and during the Pagan Period (1084-1287 A.D.) carved tablets representing the eight episodes became prevalent. This dolomite (limestone) piece has Pagan attributes such as the definition of the robe on the central Buddha but signals of its later Ava orig...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #898500 (stock #63-30)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
A late 19th century lacquer betel box from Burma is incised in an intricate pattern called “yok-thei,” with tiny dancers swirling through vegetal scrolling. The small design, primarily red and green, is punctuated with black and green circles that look like launching pads for the flying stylized dancers. (For a betel box with a similar yok-thei pattern, see color plate # 41 in “Burmese Crafts Past and Present,” by Sylvia Fraser-Lu, Oxford University Press, 1994.) This is one of the more...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Metalwork : Pre 1910 item #786538 (stock #10-40)
Silk Road Gallery
$790.00
This bronze Buddha, with attributes true to Burma's late Ava period of the 1600s, was cast a few hundred years later in the late 19th/early 20th century. It was common practice for Burmese artisans of later periods to copy styles that originated much earlier, sometimes mixing attributes from several periods and regions. In this beautifully cast handsome Buddha, the form follows the Ava look in all respects. The wide forehead, lowered eyes, well-defined nose and small, slightly upturned lips comb...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #788418 (stock #64-03)
Silk Road Gallery
SOLD
An elephant with raised trunk, symbol of hospitality, forms the handle of this carved teakwood Burmese rice scoop. The dark red lacquer, applied over black lacquer in the traditional manner of Burmese artisans, is worn so the black undercoat shows through in areas, giving this early 20th century piece an inviting patina. The elephant trunk, which forms the scoop handle, is especially worn and shows evidence of many years of use. A simple decorative pattern is carved along the top of the scoop, a...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Sculpture : Pre 1492 item #724257 (stock #62-48)
Silk Road Gallery
$600.00
This well preserved tablet dating to the 11th century is a terracotta image of Buddha seated in bhumisparsa, or earth-touching position, within an arched niche under a tree. The tree possibly represents the bodhi tree where Buddha attained enlightenment. Relics such as this have been recovered from under stupa throughout Burma. Small clay votive plaques were first introduced in neighboring India as mementos for pilgrims visiting Buddhist sites. They were adopted in Burma during the 7th century a...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Southeast Asian : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #896352 (stock #63-23)
Silk Road Gallery
$695.00
An offering stand, or “kalat,” used by the Intha people who live in the villages around Inle Lake in one of the Shan states in northeastern Burma, is from the late 19th century. A similar though more recent piece in the British Museum is pictured in “Visions from the Golden Land: Burma and the Art of Lacquer,” by Isaacs and Blurton, British Museum Press, p. 163. Kalat stands such as this were used by families in much the same manner as the tall, spired hsun-ok to carry offerings of food ...