Asian Antiques by Silk Road

Duan Inkstone Early Qing

Duan Inkstone Early Qing


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Chinese: Scholar Art: Pre 1837 VR: Item # 902690

Please refer to our stock # 38-56 when inquiring.
Silk Road Gallery
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(203) 208-0771

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 $600.00 
An early 18th century inkstone has a gourd-shaped ink pool cut into a deep black stone slab that, along with brushes, ink and paper, represented what was referred to in Chinese literature as “the four precious things of the library.” Among the four objects, inkstones were considered the most important, the soul of the scholar’s library, because they were said to represent “the infinite subtlety of nature.” Although they appear to be relatively humble objects, inkstones were praised, collected and classified by Chinese scholars into many categories—origin, type and color of stone, firmness and slickness of the stone, curvature of the carving, clarity of the sound, and weightiness of the body—and by a vast array of colorful names such as fire brand, mynah eye and fish brain jelly. This is a duan (tuan) stone collected in Canton Province (now Guangdong) and is quite weighty and crisply carved in a meandering design. The flat area used for grinding ink sticks has a depression worn into its surface from many years of use. There is minor chipping along the lower edge of the stone; otherwise the piece is in very good condition. Dimensions: length 8 ¼” (21 cm), width 7 ½” (19 cm), depth 1 ½” (4 cm). (SEE MORE ITEMS IN OUR COLLECTION AT WWW.SILKROAD1.COM