Asian Antiques by Silk Road

Yixing Teapot With Pewter Spout

Yixing Teapot With Pewter Spout


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Directory: Antiques: Regional Art: Asian: Chinese: Folk Art: Pre 1700: Item # 976088

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This early Qing Yixing teapot bears several seals on the lid and bottom surface indicating its origin in the small town of Dingshan, in Yixing County, southern Jiangsu Province, China. The pewter spout is fashioned into the head of an elephant with trunk raised. Chinese regard for the elephant as a symbol of wisdom and strength evolved from Buddhist iconography, where it represents strength of mind toward practice of the Buddhist way of life. Pewter also forms the double handles attached with rings to four pottery loops on the teapot’s shoulder. Teapots were made from the clay of Yixing County as early as the Song Dynasty (960-1279) but it was in the 16th century during the early years of the long Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) that the vessels developed a reputation among Chinese scholars and artists, who praised, made, inscribed and collected them. The pottery ranges in color from the red of this teapot to almost black to nearly white, depending on the concentration of iron in the clay. Yixing pottery is slightly absorbent and, it is said, the teapots, after they are used over time, will make tea with only the addition of boiling water because the pot itself holds rich tea flavor. This teapot has ample evidence of long use, with a thick tea-colored coating over the inside surface, and multiple signs of use on the exterior patina. It has a crack to the left of the spout where part of a pewter tendril is missing (see photo enlargement #8); otherwise it is in good condition. Dimensions: height 7” (17.9 cm), width 6” (15.3 cm), depth including spout 8” (20.4 cm). SEE MORE ITEMS IN OUR COLLECTION AT WWW.SILKROAD1.COM