Japanese textiles dolls ceramics kanzashi by Asian Art by Kyoko
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1900 item #423038
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Japanese antique hina dolls, large musician ningyo from the 1800s. The hayashi musician dolls were added to the emperor and empress dolls (Dairi-bina), sometime in the mid to late 18th century. They were first made in Edo (today’s Tokyo) while the Zuishin, Court Guards (also known as ministrator dolls) were being created in Kyoto.

There are two types of costumes for the musician dolls, Kamishimo or Suou (su-ou)...

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #798804
Asian Art By Kyoko
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This is “kataginu” (shoulder cloth), only the upper vest of kamishimo without a trouser. Kami-shimo simply means top and bottom in Japanese. It was a high ranking samurai’s formal attire when they attended official meetings at the Edo castle. It was worn over kosode (kimono with small sleeves) with trousers. The shoulders are arch shaped and this was the style that developed in the late Edo period (1603-1868). Longer trousers (approx...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Earthenware : Pre 1900 item #940786
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Heavily glazed Japanese katakuchi bowl in the shape of a “Sazae” turban shell. Written on the lid is “made by Matsuyama” and “kashiki” (dish for serving sweetmeats). On the reverse side, there is a signature, "Kei Ho-o En" with a seal. We are not quite sure if this is an original box. Meiji, late 1800s. Great bowl for the kaiseki cuisine? A hairline crack (enlarged photo #7) is a surface crack (does not go through to the other side). Approx...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1900 item #55855
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Japanese female mask in the style of a Noh mask. This face may have been considered beautyiful many years back, but now it carries a heavy-duty insult to any ladies if they were to be called Otafuku-chan or Okame-san in Japanese. Otafuku-kaze is the mumps and there are popular snack beans called Otafuku-mame, shaped exactly like this face.

Otafuku simply means “much happiness”. Also known as Okame or Uzume, this face has been the symbol of good wishes for health and happiness...

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #940525
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Antique uchishiki, Japanese alter cloth, embroidered on silk satin with Chinese theme, “The Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove”. Probably from late 18th to mid 19th century. 26 3/8" x 25" (67cm x 63 1/2cm).

Condition: This is a beautiful antique textile even with some obvious damage and wear, still solid with a thick cotton backing. The wear is seen particularly on both ends of the design. This quality of needle work is seldom seen.

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1900 item #987738
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Takeda dolls are modeled after the popular characters from the theater play during the Edo period. They are known for their exaggerated posture and facial expressions of the puppet dolls and kabuki actors on stage. The dolls in this style, with the distinguished Kabuki actor’s makeup called ‘kumadori’ (first created by Danjyuro Ichikawa I, 1660-1704) were made in late Edo to early Meiji period...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #41739
Asian Art By Kyoko
$420.00
This Chinese vase comes from Canton from the end of the 19th century or perhaps the first few years of the 20th century. The shape is termed onion neck for obvious reasons and derives from Delft forms made in Holland in the 17th century. The bright overglaze enamel colors are typical of export wares of the era and the subject matter of boys with balloons containing characters meaning "prosperity" and "good luck".
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #557450
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Fukusa, Japanese Gift Cover, Pine, Bamboo and Plums on Fans: This type of fukusa is a covering placed over a gift at the time of a gift-giving ceremony such as "Yui-noh" which is held prior to a wedding. This is an elegant old satin silk Fukusa in excellent condition. It is not as shiny as it looks in photos. The lining is an old, red (light red color, not orange as it appears in some photos) crepe silk with padding on the rims...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #821648
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Beautiful art work of Tosa Mitsutoki* embroidered with a theme from the Noh play "Takasago" on an antique fukusa, a Japanese gift cover. The signature, seal and other characters are embroidered. To find a signature on a fukusa from this period (late Edo) is very rare; in fact, I have never seen one. The characters (at the bottom left side) read "e-dokoro azukari" which is the title for the head of the Imperial Painting Bureau...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #740340
Asian Art By Kyoko
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A woven square taken from the front of a Chinese Emperor's robe with a front facing dragon in couched gold and a constellation symbol. Yellow (or apricot yellow) robes could only be worn by the Emperor or Empress. The color has faded and changed to this current tan color. Each Emperor's robe had twelve symbols of Imperial Authority embroidered on it in specific places. We can see "The Constellation" which represents the handles of Ursa Major, the Big Dipper, just above the dragon's head...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Wood : Pre 1900 item #950421
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Noh Mask (noh-men), Hanakobu Akujyo (Akujou), bumpy nosed fierce old man. Besides the distinctive nose, he has a deep V-shaped crease between his eyebrows and the veins on his temples to his forehead, piercing bulging eyes, teeth painted in gold, with a tan colored horsehair beard and mustache. Not an ordinary face of an old man, he appears to possess something supernatural. This men(mask) is very lightweight. Written on the reverse side is "Hana kobu Aku jyo" in gold...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Earthenware : Pre 1900 item #1092131
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Cranes and pine trees are considered sacred in Japanese culture. They symbolize longevity and the everlasting devotion of a couple. The color of pine tree is evergreen and when the needles finally fall to the ground, each falls as a pair.

This is a peaceful but powerful scene, symbolizing the prosperity over a happy, united family. Each of the cranes was executed beautifully by the artist. The artist, who obviously spent whatever he could offer, signed on both vases.

The glaze on the...

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Ivory : Pre 1900 item #41744
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Old Chinese ivory figure of Guanyin, the Goddess of Mercy, in a refined and elegant pose. The body is made out of one piece elephant ivory and finish in a term "cold painted ivory" meaning that the color is applied without any firing to fix and harden it. This method of coloring ivory dates back to the Ming times and was particularly popular in the 18th century. This is probably 19th century piece. Her wonderfully tranquil face and the excellent painting make this a desirable piece.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #559006
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Antique Fukusa, a Japanese gift cover with a pair of cranes and pine Tree. This type of silk fukusa was used as a gift cover at the time of a gift-giving ceremony held prior to a wedding. This was one of the rare occasions that the recipients were expected to keep the fukusa as a gift since any return associated with a wedding was considered a bad omen.

The crane and pine trees are both regarded as the symbol of harmonious marriage and longevity in Japan. The design on this fukusa ...

All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #798809
Asian Art By Kyoko
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This is “kataginu” (shoulder cloth), only the upper vest of kamishimo without a trouser. Kami-shimo simply means top and bottom in Japanese. It was a high ranking samurai’s formal attire when they attended official meetings at the Edo castle. It was worn over kosode (kimono with small sleeves) with trousers. The shoulders are arch shaped and this was the style that developed in the late Edo period (1603-1868). Longer trousers (approx. 1.5 times longer) were chosen for special occa...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #132486
Asian Art By Kyoko
Price on Request
This is “kataginu” (shoulder cloth), only the upper part of kamishimo without a trouser. Kami-shimo simply means top and bottom in Japanese. It was a high ranking samurai’s formal attire when they attended official meetings at the Edo castle. It was worn over kosode (kimono with small sleeves) with trousers. The shoulders are arch shaped and this was the style that developed in the late Edo period (1603-1868). Longer trousers (approx. 1.5 times longer) were chosen for special occa...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1900 item #414515
Asian Art By Kyoko
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A Japanese Samurai doll (ningyo) with the look of a Daimyo: feudal lord in the Edo period (1603-1868). The Kamishimo with long hakama trousers were only worn for special occasions in the Edo castle. The samurai's blue top kimono is made out of a wash paper (a liner to his original kimono). There is a beautiful patina on his face which is covered with a gofun mixture from the time. In the old time, doll makers used to let oyster shells sit outside for years before they could ground th...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1900 item #144069
Asian Art By Kyoko
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Make-up plays a vital roll in a Kabuki play because it is dark in the Kabuki Theater (especially in 17th century Edo period without light bulbs). It was sometimes exaggerated, along with their costumes, to let the audience know right away who they were and also their emotional stages. You might have seen the elaborate (very beautiful), flashy Kabuki costumes. They certainly were not daily wears.

Here, the interesting design on a male figure face is actually Kabuki make-up called “Kumad...