Fine Japanese art and tea implements
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1411084 (stock #TRC1928)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$3,500
The artist who produced this piece, Wataru Motomura, prides himself in living a traditional life in the eastern hills of Kyoto—long known for its rich clay and idyllic pastoral lands. Though the form of this vessel appears innovative and playful, the techniques and materials used to produce it have been around for many hundreds of years. Taking inspiration from the varied pottery traditions of his native Hyogo, Motomura is also known to use clay and methods from the Shigaraki region and many o...
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 2000 item #1410409 (stock #TRC1927)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$750
The colors seen in this ceramic piece are not often encountered in the world of Japanese tea-ware pottery—a field dominated mainly by styles such as Raku, Hagi, and other traditions with relatively conservative and predictable color schemes. The aquamarine blue is rather striking, reminiscent of coral encountered in the pristine waters of tropical and remote destinations. What really makes this extraordinary however, is that this piece relies mainly on kiln conditions and a natural ash glaze t...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1920 item #1407613 (stock #TRC1926)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
Price on Request
This exceptional tea bowl was crafted by one of the great masters of Japanese pottery and given the poetic name “Nami” (wave) by a famous tea master of the Ura-senke school of tea. The Chinese character is not the standard writing for wave but rather one with more nuance, suggesting longevity—as in the image of a long enduring cresting wave. The white hakeme brush strokes and the overall shape of the tea vessel fit perfectly with its poetic name, making this ceremonial tea bowl perfect for...
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1409995 (stock #TRC1924)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
Sold, Thank You!
This exceptionally well-formed tea bowl displays highlights of flaxen and scarlet visible through a classic black glaze. Raku tea bowls such as this are made by hand, without the use of a potter's wheel. In the process of shaping the bowls, potters handle the tea bowls in much the same manner that users will hold them as they drink from them. In this manner, a connection is formed between the creator of the tea bowl and the participants in the tea ceremony. For this and other reasons, Raku bowls...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1800 item #1410002 (stock #TRC19235)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$4,500
Oribe is a visual style named after the late-16th-century tea master Furuta Oribe (1544-1615). Typically, black or green glazes are applied to the bodies of these works and light-colored windows are created using feldspar. These high-contrast areas then acts as a canvas upon which abstract, minimalistic, and often naturalistic themes are painted.

This piece is quite unique for its brown color which may have been produced using a copperfitic glaze under very specific conditions. Typ...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1900 item #1409988 (stock #TRC1923)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$2,500
Like many pottery traditions in Japan, Karatsu takes its name from the city where it originated. As early as the 15th century, Korean potters heavily influenced the development of this form—helping to endow it with the earthy, simple, and natural qualities it is so appreciated for. With crackled glazing and beautiful gold repairs of several types and from several generations, this antique tea bowl is quite attractive, a pleasure to use, and absolutely one of a kind.

In fine antiq...
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Pre 2000 item #1409985 (stock #TRC1922)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$1,200
Exquisitely painted cherry blossoms (sakura) and willow branches (yanagi) on a background of jet-black traditional lacquer.

The craftsman, Wakashima Takao (b. 1935) was born in the north of Japan in the picturesque town of Wajima. The lacquer technique particular to this region (Wajima-nuri) is rather unique in its use of an undercoating incorporating special compounds that make it exceptionally durable over time. Wakashima perfected this demanding technique and, over the course of...
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1410753 (stock #TRC1918)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$1,750
A great example of a modern Shino tea bowl based on pieces being produced nearly 500 years ago in the kilns of Mino. This piece shows excellent texture to the glaze with a very active and diverse ceramic landscape. The darker ferrous spots contrast nicely and with the white feldspar giving (in my opinion) a much nicer look than other Shino pieces produced today that commonly use a more reddish iron compound. Resting comfortably in the hand, this tea bowl definitely has a good measure of characte...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1330043 (stock #TRC1917)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$6,500
Based on a classical tale adapted into a popular Kabuki performance in late Edo, the story of the Fuji Musume or “Wisteria Maiden” is an often employed motif in Japanese art. In the story, the Wisteria Maiden is depicted in a painting holding a wisteria branch, until one day she becomes smitten with a young man passing by and steps out of the painting in an effort to capture his attention. Unfortunately, her attempts are futile. Her love goes unrequited, and she sorrowfully steps back into ...
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1407734 (stock #TRC19165)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
Sold, Thank You!
According to Kei Wakao, the artist who crafted this extraordinary work, it took him years of trial-and-error to perfect the unique rice-porcelain glaze covering this finely shaped tea vessel. Not only was it a challenge to achieve the demure milky translucence of the glaze—similar to the appearance of a grain of rice when held to the light—but also to get the right flowing consistency and pooling effect around the base.

Born in 1974 as the eldest son to a well-established kiln i...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1970 item #1407387 (stock #TRC1916)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$1,500
A wonderful translucent blue celadon Tobi vase done in the classic style of Longquan Chinese pottery. This piece was made by one of the few great female Japanese potters of the previous century—Suwa Sozan II, daughter of Meiji Imperial Court Artist Sozan I.

Suwa Sozan I (1852—1922) was born in an area of what is known today as Ishikawa prefecture. After a short stint in the military he took up pottery design and painting under Touda Tokuji in 1873. From this point forward, he d...
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 1990 item #1407727 (stock #TRC1915)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$850
This remarkable tea bowl is from the kilns of Yoshida Shuen (1940-1987)—an apprentice of Miwa Kyusetsu (1910-2012) who was awarded the status of Living National Treasure in 1983. It features a warm crackled glazing with a few small portions of the foot of the tea bowl exposed, displaying the somewhat reddish coarse clay that this piece is fashioned from.

Hagi-yaki has a tradition stretching back over 400 years and is a high-fired stoneware type of pottery. Hagi-ware is prized for...
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1950 item #1367780 (stock #TRC1914)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$950
The natural ash Hagi glaze gives this piece a mellow yet robust feel. The foot of the bowl is unglazed in places showing traces of ferrous-rich clay in the form of an orangish hue. The sides of the bowl show pale ash, ivory, and faint hints of lavender. Overall a classic and attractive example of an expertly crafted Hagi tea bowl.

The creator of this work, Korai-zaemon Saka XI was born in Yamaguchi prefecture in 1912. In 1958, just 10 years after marrying the daughter of Korai-zaemo...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1920 item #1370946 (stock #TRC19135)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
Price on Request
During the Meiji period there were only five potters ever to be awarded the prestigious designation of Imperial Court Artist: Ito Tozan, Seifu Yohei III, Miyagawa Kozan, Itaya Hazan, and the artist whose work is featured here, Suwa Sozan. Several years prior to receiving this designation, Sozan spent a period of time in Korea where he undertook the formidable task of excavating and restoring ancient Korean kilns in an attempt to replicate traditional techniques used in centuries past. The vase f...
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Contemporary item #1368421 (stock #TRC1913)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$1,100
Decidedly modern, Japanese, and minimalist; the textures, colors, and form of this fascinating tea bowl all suggest inspiration from natural objects. The grey, smooth, polished interior of the tea bowl contrasts nicely with the textured ferrous dark ochre ash glaze on the exterior. Somewhere between an ido and wan-nari shape, it rests surprisingly well in the hand and allows the user to contemplate the mysteries of nature through their tactile and visual senses.

Widely exhibited bot...
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Bowls : Pre 1990 item #1403660 (stock #TRC19113)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
Sold, thank You!
The creator of this exceptional tea bowl is Koto Kenshi, a native of the town of Hagi in Yamaguchi prefecture who has been producing many fine works since opening his studio in 1970. This piece features a milky ashen glaze with a portion of the foot of the tea bowl exposed, displaying the reddish coarse clay beneath.

Hagi-yaki has a tradition stretching back over 400 years and is a high-fired stoneware type of pottery. Hagi-ware is prized for its subdued colors and classical feature...
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1920 item #1403651 (stock #TRC19112)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
$1,250
This extraordinary cha-ire (powdered tea container) displays an excellent glaze that appears to have only grown more intricate and rich with time. Contrasting against a reddish brown background are flows and pools of darker glaze along with lighter textured speckles. On the base is a stamp indicating that this piece is a type of Shidoru-yaki and the overall appearance shows quite some age.

Shidoro-yaki is a type of Mino-ware that has a long history stretching back as far as the Muro...
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Contemporary item #1403658 (stock #TRC19111)
Kyoto Ceramics and Fine Art
Sold, thank You!
An excellent example of Japanese minimalist aesthetic that transcends its humble origins, this mizusashi, or fresh water pot used in tea ceremony, displays a classic Hagi glaze contrasting nicely with a lacquered wood cover. It separates itself from most pieces of this type by the addition of a pouring spout, which is quite unusual for this type of tea-ware implement.

Hagi-yaki has a tradition stretching back over 400 years and is a high-fired stoneware type of pottery. Hagi is priz...