Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1351962
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This powerful Greco-Roman marble bust is a portrait of a young god that dates to the late Hellenistic period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.9 inches high, and was once part of a statuette. This piece portrays a young god wearing a Greek Hellenistic "Attic" type helmet, and has a slightly upturned head, along with the head slightly tilted to the left that is also seen bending away form the angled neck. In addition, the eyes are slightly upturned which is a god-like attribute relative to Greek Hellenistic art. The eyes also being deeply inset also draws the viewer to the fleshy lips that are also added features of early Hellenistic Greek period art that was established by Lysippos, who produced striking portraits of Alexander the Great. (For the artistic style related to the portraiture of Alexander the Great that is attributed to Lysippos, see the attached photo from the "Search of Alexander" exhibit catalog, 1980, no. 25. This photo is of a marble bust of Alexander the Great now seen in the Pella Museum, Greece, and was executed in the 2nd century B.C. as a portrait that represented Alexander as a romantic divinity in the late Hellenistic period.) The attractive marble bust offered here also follows this earlier artistic sculptural style, and is very analogous in artistic style to the Pella example noted above. The piece offered here also likely represents the Greek and Roman war gods Ares and Mars, but the likeness seen here of this young warrior god also represents many known portraits of Alexander the Great, and in effect, this piece could have represented and doubled both as a god and Alexander. (For the portrait type see: A. Stewart, "Faces of Power, Alexander's Image and Hellenistic Politics".) This superb piece has some minor losses to the nose and to the lower chin, otherwise it is a complete example. This piece also has some spotty root marking, and a beautiful light brown patina over a bright white Parian type marble. This piece is an attractive example, and is an excellent representation of late Hellenistic period Greek art which also has exceptional artistic style. This exceptional piece is also mounted on a steel pin along with a custom Plexiglas display base. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1352271
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This extremely rare ceramic is a Moche culture piece that dates to the Moche Period IV, circa 400-600 A.D. This erotic piece is approximately 8 inches high, by 7.8 inches wide, and is in intact mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. This piece also has superb surfaces with some attractive spotty dark black deposits, and some dark brown burnishing. This piece is a Moche "stirrup type" vessel, and has a dark red spout, along with two attached figures that is a seated woman wearing a dark orange/brown hooded cloak, and necklace; and a seated spirit figurine that is also seen wearing a cream colored cloak, ear flares, and a decorative hat with a tie that runs under the chin. The decorative hat also has some dark red "line design" features, and is of the type depicted on Moche "portrait type" vessels. The seated woman appears to be expressionless, and has one hand on her abdomen, and the other arm is seen grasping the back of the seated spirit figure. The seated spirit figure also has one arm behind the back of the seated woman, and the other hand is tucked under the cloak of the seated woman and appears to be engaged in the act of masturbating the woman's genital organs. The woman also appears to have an open eyed serene, but transfixed expression. The spirit figure also has a wide smile with his tongue extended out, and in addition to the narrowing almond eyes, these facial features convey a very powerful and licentious expression. The facial expressions of both figures seen on this piece, together portray an erotic image that is so well executed, one could easily label this piece a masterpiece of Moche erotic and pre-Columbian art. The face of this spiritual being is also humanoid, as the extended lower jaw and mouth have primate features. This piece truly conveys Moche erotic art at it's height, and in the Moche mind, the erotic composition of this vessel may have simply referred to the human nature of reproduction and the joy of sex, which in their mind, was a gift from their gods. The exceptional piece offered here is extremely rare, and the only other known recorded example of this type is seen in the Museo Larco Museum in Lima, Peru. (This Museo Larco Museum piece is also published in "Checan: Essays on Erotic Elements in Peruvian Art", by Rafael Larco Hoyle, Nagel Pub., 1965, p. 121. This piece was also likely produced from the same molds as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) Another reason why Moche erotic vessels of this type are extremely rare, is that the Spanish colonizers who uncovered Moche erotic vessels regarded these pieces as manifestations of something sinful. The Spanish were scandalized by the ceramic's graphic detailing of sex between humans, skeletons, animals, and Moche anthropomorphic deities; and according to Northwestern professor of Anthropology and Sexuality Studies Mary Weismantel: "Moche sex pottery is the largest and most graphic and explicit of all pre-Columbian cultures." The colonial Spanish were shaken to their Catholic core, and over the years, they smashed numerous and rare examples of Moche erotic pottery to bits, and even criminalized the ownership of such pottery, as these Moche erotic ceramics often depicted premarital and non-reproductive sex acts. Even today, the erotic collection of Moche pottery seen at the Museo Larco Museum in Lima, is kept in a secluded separate room. A few years ago they were kept under lock and key at the bottom of the Museum of Archaeology, reserved for only the most educated of eyes; those of social scientists and scholors, and for the rest of the population, the erotic pottery was deemed far too provocative. It's also interesting to note that this piece shows no nudity relative to both of the figures seen on this powerful piece, as they are both fully clothed, but yet, it is the provocative nature of this piece that truly defines this piece as a masterpiece of pre-Columbian art. This extremely rare piece also has a TL Authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 03250811. Ex: Dr. Gottfried Freiherr von Marienfels collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the TL document noted above, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1352464
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This superb piece is a Greek bronze saucer bead that was produced during the Geometric period, circa 800-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.75 inches in diameter, by .85 inches high, and is an extremely large example for the type. This piece is a solid example, as it was cast as one piece, and was made from a mold. This solid piece is intact, and has no damage and/or deep surface scrapes. There are also six decorative round "target eye" symbol designs seen on each side, and they were hand stamped on each side. There is also a rounded collar seen on each side at the opening, and the interior is hollow, as this piece was likely designed as a bead, and may have been the central component in a beaded necklace that had other similar beads with graduating sizes. This piece also has smooth sides, and this piece is well finished, as well as having a very esoteric "saucer type" shape and design. This esoteric piece also has a nice dark brown/green patina, with some minute spotty red highlights. Large Greek Geometric Period beads of this type were likely worn in life, and were also votive in nature, and are now scarce on the market in this size. This attractive piece can easily be worn today in a custom made necklace, or simply on a leather string. This piece is also fitted to a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1353007
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This attractive piece is a Roman bronze figurine of the god Mercury, and dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a complete example with no repair/restoration. This piece has an attractive light to dark green patina, along with some minute spotty red mineralized highlights. There is also some spotty light brown mineral deposits, and overall, this piece is in it's superb natural "as found" condition. This piece was cast as one piece from a mold, and was likely produced as a votive object for a temple, or for a private Roman shrine in a home known as a "lararium". Mercury is also the Roman name for the Greek god Hermes, and both gods had the same attributes, and are seen wearing a winged helmet or cap known as a "petasus". In addition, the figurine offered here is seen holding a money bag in his right hand, and a "caduceus" over his right shoulder along with a draped cloak. The "caduceus" also served as a herald's staff which possessed magical powers, and has two entwined snakes at the top. Hermes and Mercury both were the Greek and Roman gods of commerce, travel, and were the messengers of the gods. This nude figurine is also seen wearing a necklace, and stands by itself on it's own double tiered base. This piece was meant to be seen in it's upright position, as the base is very wide at the bottom. This piece for a small object has a great deal of eye appeal, and can be seen at a distance because of it's simplistic design. The face has a "mask-like" design, and imbues this piece with a magical haunting appearance. It's very likely that a religious pilgrim would have purchased this object as a votive donation to either a religious temple, or as an addition to a private shrine. This piece also sits on a custom raised display stand, and simply lifts off the stand. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre AD 1000 item #1353070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This piece is a Roman silver denarius minted circa late 168- early 169 A.D., Rome mint, and is a rare to scarce issue, as it is the last issue minted by the Rome mint in the name of Lucius Verus. This coin is very fine/about very fine (VF/VF-), is 2.5g., and is approximately 19mm. This coin shows the image of Lucius Verus facing right, wearing an olive wreath, and around is the legend L VERVS AVG-ARM PARTH MAX. The reverse shows a draped and seated Aequitas-Moneta facing left, holding scales in her right hand to the front, and behind is a cornucopia, and around is the legend TRPVIIIIMDV-COSIII. Lucius Verus was joint emperor with Marcus Aurelius, circa 161-169 A.D., and the coin offered here was likely minted in the period shortly before or during the death of Verus early in 169 A.D.; and according to the BMC reference (British Museum Catalog), this coin was minted as the last issue of Lucius Verus by the Rome mint. Both emperors at this point in time were outside of Rome, and were beginning to be engaged in a bitter campaign in Germania in securing the empire. In the prior six years, both emperors were engaged in a protracted war in Parthia and Armenia, and as a consequence, by 169 A.D., the imperial treasury was severely drained of funds. In addition, a serious plaque brought back from the east swept through the legions and the general population, which reduced taxes and revenues to the empire. The coinage also became slightly debased, from an average of circa 3.0-3.2 grams, circa 161-169 A.D., to about 3.0 grams for a silver denarius, circa 169-170 A.D. (See D.R. Walker, "The Metrology of the Roman Silver Coinage III", 1978, p. 125.) The coin offered here is rare to scarce due to the reasons noted above, and is among the rarest issues of Lucius Verus produced by the Rome mint, as this issue was minted over a short period of time, and there was a severe lack of metal from which to mint coinage. This may also explain why this coin also appears to be a "fourree", meaning it is an ancient coin with a base metal core and a precious metal exterior. The coin offered here appears to have a core that is a debased silver, and may contain a high concentration of tin and/or lead. One can see sections primarily on the obverse of this coin that show minute cracks where the outer layer is peeling away from the inner core, and in addition, sections of the edge of the flan under high magnification show a thin outer layer for both sides of the coin. It may be that Marcus Aurelius himself ordered the Rome mint to produce a coin of this type for the impending campaign in Germania, but what is known for certain is that this coin is a high quality "fourree", and was likely intentionally and officially produced by the Rome mint, and if this was the case, this was an extremely rare circumstance in the history of Roman coinage. A coin of extreme historical interest, and one of the best recorded examples. References: BMC 481-2, RIC 595, Sear 1544. Ex: Harlan Berk Ltd., Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1353952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,285.00
This extremely rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF) condition, weighs 5.0 grams, and is approximately 21mm in diameter. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing left, a monogram at the lower front of the bust, and a Greek legend below and behind. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing left, with the legend "ADEI" before, and "PUTAN" behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The legend seen on the obverse is extremely rare, and may refer to the magistrate that minted the coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. This coin may also be the only known recorded example with this obverse legend, in addition to, the bust of Zeus that is seen facing left which is seldom seen as well. The reverse legend refers to the Epirote Republic itself. The artistic style of the Zeus bust also has an extremely high degree of art, and is a better style that what is usually seen on the scarce coinage of this type. Another example of this coin type, without the obverse legend and the Zeus bust facing right, was sold by Numismatica Ars Classica in Zurich, Switzerland for 1,300 SF. The coin offered here is not only an extremely rare type, but is also in extremely fine condition. References: Franke, Epirus, 32ff (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1354392
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This complete piece is approximately 6 inches high, and is an intact example with no repair/restoration. This intact piece is in superb to mint condition, with only some very minor scrapes and minute dents, which makes it much better than what is normally seen on the market. This piece has a flat bottom and easily stands by itself, and has a graceful upper shoulder and extended neck that runs up into a trefoil spout. This piece also has an added handle that is solid, and attaches to the main body of the piece and at the top of the trefoil spout. This piece was hand beaten from one sheet of bronze and graduates in thickness from the bottom to the spout lip which is at it's thinnest point. The piece also has a beautiful and even dark green patina with some dark brown, light blue, and red highlights, and in addition, there is some attractive minute root marking. The workmanship of this piece is exceptional, and this piece has a very graceful and compact shape. The shape and/or form of this vessel is also seen relative to numerous ceramic examples that copy it's graceful size and shape. This piece was used for fine dining, and likely held a concentrated wine that was mixed with water. This piece also made it very easy to pour a liquid, as the trefoil spout could pour a liquid in three directions. A piece with a great deal of eye appeal, and is scarce in the market in this superb condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1355169
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful piece is a light blue Roman glass ribbed bowl that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 6.75 inches in diameter, by 2.2 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no hairline cracks, chips, or any other imperfections. This piece also has 26 vertical ribs that increase in thickness, and run upwards from the flat bottom to just below the upper rim. This type of bowl is also known as a "pillar-molded" bowl, as it was mold made, and was then ground and polished into shape. There are also two decorative well-defined "wheel-cut concentric grooves", and a small well-defined "wheel-cut circle" seen on the inner bottom center of the bowl. In addition, there are two shallow "wheel-cut grooves" that are seen running around the middle of the inner wall. These shallow "wheel-cut grooves" are also so shallow in sections that they do not appear to have been intended as a decorative type element, but rather are marks that resulted from centering a polishing tool within the inner surface of the bowl. There are also some faint polishing lines still visible on the inner surface, as this piece is in mint condition, and may have been offered solely as a votive type object. This piece also has a spotty multi-colored iridescence, and some light earthen deposits seen mostly on the outer surface of the vessel. The exceptional piece offered here is also one of the better recorded examples, and is nearly identical and larger than the example sold in Christies Antiquities, New York, June 2012, lot 151 ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $9,375.00 realized. 5.4 inches in diameter, with 22 vertical ribs. See attached photo.) Another example that was recently sold was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, July 2016, lot 204 ($15,000.00-$22,000.00 estimates, $16,138.00 realized. 5.75 inches in diameter, with 26 vertical ribs.) The piece offered here is not only one of the best recorded examples, but it is also a beautiful example with a light blue color that has a high degree of eye appeal, and as such, it compares in color and quality to the two other examples noted above. For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", 1975, nos. 50-52. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1356496
Apolonia Ancient Art
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These scarce nearly identical standing nude concubine gold earrings date circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. These erotic pieces are approximately 2.25 inches high, from the top of the hoop to the bottom of the figures, and are .3 inches wide at the shoulders. The figures themselves are approximately 1.5 inches high. These solid gold pieces together weigh 4.4 grams, and are not gold gilt over another metal which is sometimes the case relative to ancient jewelry. These attractive pieces are complete, and have no restoration/repair. These pieces are also very durably made, and are solid examples that can easily be worn today. Each of the figures are completely nude, and have some minute punched details such as dotted breast nipples, belly button circles, circular eyes, and minute linear hair. Each figurine also appears to be wearing an Egyptian type wig, and the standing body pose is classic Egyptian, with the arms straight down at the sides and the legs tightly together. The frontal design is slightly raised on both pieces, and the back of both earrings are mostly flat. Each figure is also made from two gold sheets that were folded over, and this doubling of the thin gold sheet gave these earrings some added strength. These earrings are highly erotic, and were likely worn to identify a woman who was a concubine for a wealthy and/or important person in antiquity. They also resemble the goddess Isis, and these pieces may have been worn in a religious capacity as well. The nude figurines also resemble a small carved ivory Egyptian concubine that is now seen in the Walters Art Museum. (This piece is approximately 2.5 inches high, and the back is flat as the gold earrings offered here. This piece was also purchased by Henry Walters in 1930. Inventory no.: 71.522. See attached photo.) The scarce to rare erotic gold earrings offered here can easily be worn today, as they also have thick gold hoops that are very solid. It's likely that these pieces were worn in antiquity, and may also have been a votive type object worn in the afterlife. A custom metal earring stand is included. Ex: D. Weller collection, Essen, Germany, circa 1930's-1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356502
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This mint quality and extra large Greek Attic vessel is a "glaux type" skyphos that dates circa 475-450 B.C. In the Beazley Archive of vessel shapes, this type of vessel is also classified as a "Type B" skyphos. This large vessel is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is 3.5 inches high. This piece is much larger than other examples of this type, and it has a larger field on each side of the vessel for the painted decorative elements that are seen on this attractive vessel. These decorative elements are two standing owls, which are each framed by two olive sprays, and are seen on each side of the vessel. Each of the standing owls are approximately 2.7 inches high, which is also the approximate height that this type of vessel is usually found. This piece also has a very distinctive design feature, which is that one handle is seen attached to the vessel in a vertical fashion, and the other in a horizontal fashion. This handle design also refers to the common name that this type of vessel is known as, and this vessel type is often referred to as a "glaux shyphos". This esoteric vessel also has a rim wall that curves gently inward towards the rim, a single black centering circle seen on the bottom of the footed base, and a row of dots that frames the face of each owl. Each owl also has short stubby legs, and straight lines that form the design of the wing that is facing the viewer. These design features are also found on the standing owls that are seen on the silver coinage of Athens that is contemporary with the vessel offered here. In addition, the composition seen on this piece is balanced on a ground line that circles the piece. The standing owl was also sacred to Athena, who was the patron goddess for the city of Athens. It may also be likely that the type of vessel offered here may have had a ceremonial and/or ritual purpose, and was offered as a votive type vessel. This may also explain why this vessel is in mint condition, with no cracks or chips, and is seen in it's pristine "as found" condition. This beautiful piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, seen mostly in the low relief sections of the vessel, and a vibrant deep black glaze that highlights the design features that are rendered in a dark orange color. Another analogous vessel of this type, and of the more common smaller size, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 2016; Ex J.M.E. collection, Sotheby's London, May 1987. (See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional example seldom seen in this size and condition. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Celtic bronze ring, otherwise known as a "terret ring", and dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece was reportedly found in the southern coastal region of the United Kingdom, and was mounted on a war chariot that served as a guide for the horse reins. The reins would pass through the ring and gave the charioteer greater control over the horses. The design of this piece, with a raised center and oval shape, also allowed for better separation of the two sets of reins that connected to the two horses that pulled a Celtic war chariot. This piece also has an attachment loop at the base which was mounted down into a wooden rail, and was held in place by a pin. This esoteric piece was also made when Caius Julius Caesar invaded Britain, circa 55 B.C., and the war chariot was relatively new to the Romans as a weapon of war. The war chariot, with one charioteer and one warrior with a shield and spear, gave the Romans all they could handle at the time of the invasion. The Romans faced two-wheeled and four-wheeled chariots which carried warriors into the attack. The war chariot was introduced to Britain in the 3rd century B.C. by the Parisi of Yorkshire, the Gallic tribe whose capital still bears their name (Paris). The Celtic chariots were made of light wooded frames and were elaborately fitted with bronze fittings and wheels with iron rims. The war chariot is featured in many of the sagas of Celtic mythology, and the piece offered here is an excellent representation of the native Celts of Britain. This complete piece has a graceful shape, has no repair/restoration, and has a beautiful dark green patina. There is also some spotty mineral deposits seen mostly on the underside of the piece. Another analogous piece of the same size and type was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Dec. 1995, no. 339. (2500-3500 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see: E.T. Leeds "Celtic Ornament in the British Isles", Oxford, 1933, pp. 118-126. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356647
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This nice Roman bronze is an eagle applique that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.2 inches high, by 2 inches high. This piece is a very detailed Roman eagle that has a raised head and spread wings. The wings are very detailed, and have very fine feather "line design". The head is designed with the head facing right, and is seen looking at the viewer. There is also detail on the head not facing the viewer, and there is a very defined "dotted eye". This piece has a flat back, and there is an extended mounting pin seen in the back center. This piece likely served as an applique for a vessel, and may have served as a decorative element in a legionary phalera, or an element in Roman armor. The military application relative to this piece is readily apparent, as the Roman eagle was the Roman symbol of the power, and was presented in many art forms within the Roman army. This attractive piece is intact, and has no repair/restoration. This piece also has a nice dark green patina with some minute red highlights, and is a fine example for the type. Another analogous example was offered by Bonham's Antiquities, London, July 1995, no. 442. (500-600 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) The nice piece offered here is also mounted on a custom display base. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Concordia Art, Las Vegas, NV., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356856
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This mint quality piece is a Greek Boeotian black glazed kantharos that dates circa 450-425 B.C. This large piece is approximately 10 inches high, by 7.75 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece has a lustrous vibrant black glaze seen both on the inner and outer surfaces of this vessel, and features added white decorative elements that are seen running around the vessel. These prominent decorative elements are ivy leaf tendrils, along with a chevron pattern that is seen below. The chevron pattern is also a rare decorative element, and this piece is one of the few known examples that features this element. This piece also has distinctive looped "strap handles" that raise gracefully above the main body of the vessel, and a raised "stem base". This large vessel was likely used for holding wine, and was used for drinking and/or for pouring libations in a religious ceremony. The ivy leaf decorative elements seen on this piece are also tied to Dionysus, who was the Greek god of wine and revelry. In addition, this type of vessel is often portrayed on painted pottery being held by Satyrs, who were bestial goat-men that were associated with drinking and Dionysian festivals. This piece is in superb to mint quality condition, and has no noticeable repair/restoration. There are some minute stress cracks seen on the strap handles, but these are very minor and are difficult to see, and this vessel is a solid example which can be held today. There is also some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the inner surfaces, and the entire piece has a beautiful even lustrous black glaze. Most vessels of this type usually have a great deal of repair/restoration, and significant losses to the white painted decorative elements, but this is not the case with this exceptional and intact example, and this piece is also one of the best recorded examples. This piece is also analogous to the example found in the Metropolitan Museum in New York, no. 1993.197. Another piece of this type, size, and condition was sold in Christie's Antiquities, London, oct. 2011, no. 71. (3,000.00-5,000.00 Pound estimates, 6,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1356937
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This flawless piece is a Greek Apulian Xenon-ware kylix that dates circa mid 4th century B.C. This lovely little piece is approximately 7.75 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, and is in mint quality condition with no repair/restoration. This piece has been attributed to the "Red Swan Group" and it is classified as being "Xenon-ware", which is a sub group of "Greek Apulian" ceramics. This piece has a lustrous black glaze with dark orange painted decorative elements, and features a "high footed base ring". The decorative elements include a red swan facing left, within a "double circular tondo", along with two "three dotted" symbols and a single "ivy leaf" symbol. These symbols are commonly seen on Apulian type ceramics, and may signify the artist in one particular workshop and/or the workshop itself. There are also two laurel wreaths seen on the piece, with one on the inner surface that frames the inner "double circular tondo", and another on the outer surface that runs around the piece. The two handles attached to the piece are upturned, and have some minute stress cracks which is normal for a ceramic of this type, and have no visual repair/restoration. The surfaces have some minute cracking which is also normal, and some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly in the low relief sections of the vessel. The surface also has a preservative wax, which lends this attractive piece it's glossy appearance as well. Overall, an exceptional piece and a high quality example. (An analogous example of the same quality and size was sold by Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 1994, no. 396. $1,000.00-$1,500.00 estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see Margaret Mayo, "The Art of South Italy, Vases from Magna Graecia", Richmond, Virginia, 1982, no. 160. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356955
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,285.00
This interesting piece is an Etruscan red-figure stemmed plate that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.45 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has been classified as being from the "Genucilia Group", and the group name derives from an example that had the Etruscan name "P. Genucilia" inscribed under its stemmed foot. This piece also has been described as a "star plate", as noted by Prof. Mario Del Chiaro in "Etruscan Red-Figure Vase Painting at Caere", University of California, 1974. The "five pointed wave pattern" seen on the top side of this piece also resembles a "star burst". The "wave pattern" seen on these vessels are also known to have only five of these "points" as well, and why there is generally a "five pointed wave pattern" seen on these vessels is unknown. The "five pointed wave pattern" seen on this piece frames a young goddess facing left that is seen wearing long earrings and a sakkos over her hair. The sakkos has "X patterns" within, and the entire composition is done with a dark black polychrome over a light tan terracotta. This intact piece has a raised stemmed base, and has some spotty white calcite and mineral deposits seen in the low relief sections of the vessel. The bottom of the vessel has several old collection numbers seen including: "P401", "1026", and "Lot 60, Gray Coll., Sotheby's, June 88". This piece also has two "X" graffiti marks seen on the top side inscribed over the face of the young goddess. This piece was also used as an offering plate in sanctuaries, and the "X" pattern graffiti, along with the "X" patterns seen within the sakkos design, may also indicate the workshop where this piece was made and/or the artist who produced this piece. The overall design of this piece makes this a very interesting ancient ceramic, and is rare in this intact condition with vibrant painted images. (Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2011, no. 233. 800.00-1,200.00 Pounds estimates, 2125 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1988. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356971
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately .5 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the shield emblems are approximately .3 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 2.4 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems have a small raised dotted bar in the center, framed by a detailed dotted border, and this design completes the look of the shield emblems. The shield emblems also have a single rivet that attaches them to the thick gold hoops, and this adds additional strength and durability to these beautiful examples. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and comes with a custom metal display stand. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356984
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This Roman gold earring with a shield emblem is a complete example, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This attractive and large example is approximately 1.1 inches in diameter, and weighs 3.5 grams. This piece is a solid example, and is not plated. The shield emblem seen on this superb piece has a dotted decorative element in the center, and a beaded border. The clasp has been wired shut, as the wearer likely wore this piece everyday. The clasp can be adjusted so that it can be easily worn today, and the hoop is very durable as it has a large diameter. The shield emblem also has a single rivet that attaches it to the solid gold hoop, and this adds additional strength and durability to this beautiful example. This piece also has some spotty dark red/brown deposits, and can easily be cleaned. This piece is a very collectable example of ancient jewelry, and is an exceptional large piece. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357051
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems and large hoops are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately 1.25 inches high, by .25 inches in diameter for the shield emblems. Together the pair weighs 1.5 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems each have a raised central dot, and have a detailed beaded border. The hoops are very simple, and are a single strand that was attached to each of the shield emblems. These pieces are very durable, and can easily be worn today, as there is no clasp. This pair has some minute light red mineralization, and can be easily cleaned if one desires. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry with a simple design, which also displays well with the wearer. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition: