Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1399716
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This lively and rare Roman-Egyptian bronze dancer dates to the Late Hellenistic Period-Early Imperial Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an extremely rare to rare example that was likely produced in Alexandria, Egypt. This piece is a lively dancer, also known as a "grotesque dancer", that displays a great deal of movement with a twisted torso, and appears to be seen in a spinning dance. This figure also has his over sized genitals exposed behind, and has "dwarf-like" features with a raised hump on his upper back. This vibrant piece may also be an actual representation of a bald and naked deformed dancing dwarf that was popular during the late Hellenistic period. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights, and is a complete example save for the missing lower left leg and the foot of the right leg. (Another analogous example approximately 3 inches high, and attributed to the same period, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 41, for $8,500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1327759
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This rare Greek marble is the upper torso of a griffon, and dates to the Archaic Period, circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 14.5 inches high, by 5 inches wide, by 8.25 inches deep. This piece sits on a custom wooden stand, and together with the stand, it is approximately 17.75 inches high. This solid piece is quite heavy, and also rotates on the stand with a thick metal support pin. This piece has some chips to the mouth and to the right ear, otherwise the bust of the griffon is nearly complete. This piece is also missing the lower third section that was usually in the form of a lion's leg with a lion's paw footed base. This attractive and powerful looking piece has a light brown patina, and is a very decorative type piece. This esoteric piece was part of a table leg known as a "trapezophoros" that supported a table top with several other identical legs. The "trapezophoros" types are usually designed with panther or lion heads, and the rarest type is the griffon type, and only a handful of these examples are known. This piece has a bird-like mouth and tongue, with short ears and eyes, and eagle feathers seen on each side of the neck. For the ancient Greeks, the griffon symbolized the destroying power of the gods, and during the 5th-4th century B.C., it came to represent an anti-Persian symbol. A limited number of Greek gold staters, minted by Alexander the Great in Asia, had this symbol on the Corinthian helmet of Athena, which was seen on the obverse of this coinage. This symbol was also prevalent on Greek armor at the battle of Gaugamela in September 331 B.C., where Alexander the Great finally smashed the Persian army by decimating over 165,000, and it was this battle that forever defined the ultimate confrontation between the East and the West. In ancient Greek art, the griffon was also applied in the decoration of friezes, and the Romans followed this tradition, with one of the finest examples seen at the temple of Antoninus and Faustina in Rome. The piece offered here also has an open mouth and it exudes a lively look. An extremely rare to rare early Greek piece with a great deal symbolism. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: This piece has additional documentation for the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1281362
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This superb to mint quality vessel is a Moche stirrup vessel that dates circa 300-400 A.D., Moche III Period. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This striking vessel has some minute black spotty mineral deposits and root marking, and has a nice even glaze. This piece is a lustrous deep dark red stirrup vessel, with a cream colored body, and the decorative elements seen on the main body of this vessel are also rendered in a dark lustrous red color. These decorative elements are comprised of two anthropomorphic figures seen moving to the right, with snake-headed tails and trailing snake-headed headdress/ears; and three snakes, with one seen between the stirrup handle, and two others which act as a dividing panel for each of the moving figures. These moving figures are also seen with a serpent-like and/or Iguana-like head, and a single human leg and arm which are extended away from the body, and this Moche convention of art is meant to convey that these figures are in motion. In addition, these figures are seen holding a sacrificial tumi knife in each hand, which may be an indication that this vessel portrays a sacrificial scene, as these moving figures may also be portraying Moche priests in costume who are engaged in a ceremonial sacrificial scene as "spirit gods". These moving figures also appear to be confronting the two facing snakes, and these facing snakes may also be seen as "spiritual sacrificial victims". According to Christopher Donnan in "Moche Fineline Painting: Its Evolution and Its Artists", UCLA Fowler Museum, Los Angeles, Ca., 1999, p. 196-197, Donnan comments further on Moche ceramics of this type: "The paintings of several other artists are stylistically similar to those of the Madrid Painter and the Larco Painter. All are on similar stirrup spout bottles with red spouts and white chambers. Both the red and white slips on these bottles were well prepared. They are covered evenly and completely, with none of the underlying color bleeding through. They painted fineline designs in red slip and added details either by overpainting or the cut-slip technique. Careful burnishing produced a handsome surface luster. These features are very distinctive amoung Phase III painted vessels. Perhaps they were produced in a single workshop." (See attached photo from the above reference, Fig. 6.19, that shows an analogous spiritual figure as seen on the vessel offered here. This piece also shows this figure holding a sacrificial head by the hair. This piece was also classified as being stylistically similar to the Madrid Painter.) The piece offered here is very close stylistically to the Madrid Painter, and may be by this painter and/or an individual who worked in his workshop. Moche vessels of this type are now scarce on the market, as they were only produced during the Phase III Period, and are of an extremely high artistic style. Overall, this piece is a superb intact example with vibrant colors, and is also likely by the Madrid Painter and/or his workshop. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, Germany, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL authenticity test document from Gutachten Lab, Germany, no. 219005, dated 05-15-1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1322070
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This flawless piece is a Greek red ware pyxis that dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th-early 3rd century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.85 inches in diameter at the lid and lower base, and 4 inches high. This flawless piece is in mint quality condition, and has no repair and/or restoration. Two-part Greek vessels of this type are scarce to rare in this mint condition, as the lid and base have thin edges that extend away from the main body of the piece. The lid fits very close to the supporting lower base, and lifts easily on and off the base. The lid also has a roundel seen at the top that may have had a bone, metal, or stone insert with a carved image. A nearly identical vessel of the same size with a terracotta image of a goddess, seen within the roundel at the top, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XXVI, no. 118. ($5,000.00 estimate. See attached photo.) The piece offered here also has some spotty light brown earthen, and minute black mineral deposits. A scarce vessel in this mint condition. Ex: Charles Ede collection, London, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Prehistorical item #1402347
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This intact and attractive piece is an Apulian-Gnathian pelike that dates to the late 4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.7 inches high. This piece has a thin black glaze with attractive light gray burnishing, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This vessel also has additional and detailed fine body molding seen at the upper rim, and above the ring base on the lower body of the vessel. There are added incised decorative tendril vines that run around the upper shoulder, and these incised elements are also seen on the neck of the vessel. There are also added white painted vine leaves and grape clusters, although faded, that are seen on this vessel as well. This piece has some minute root marking, and some light brown mineral deposits which also add to this vessel's eye appeal. A nice intact piece with fine body molding, and likely made by an accomplished potter. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1230562
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is an extremely rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This piece dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition, as this complete piece has an hardened earthen over glaze and is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that are in the superb condition seen here, as the hardened earthen glaze has preserved these pieces. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 12.5 and 8 inches long, and both have a shank end diameter of approximately .75 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a square designed tip which transitions into a rounded shank. The shanks of both the spearpoint and the butt-spike have fine hammered workmanship. This weapon probably had a wooden shaft that was approximately 10-12 feet long, and was better suited for a cavalryman, rather than an infantryman, who often carried a heavier lance known as a "sarissa". The shaft was also likley tapered, and was thinner at the back end of the shaft which would save weight for the weapon. In this case, the cavalryman could ground the weapon with the butt-spike, and also could turn the weapon around in case the spearpoint broke in battle. The piece offered here has a slight curve in the blade, and this likely occurred in battle as well. The butt-spike also allowed the cavalryman to hold the shaft near the weapon's center of gravity, as both the spearpoint and the butt-spike weigh nearly the same. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon offered here is one such weapon, as the finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1274546
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This scarce and beautiful piece is a Greco-Scythian gold rosette plaque that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 2.1 inches in diameter, by .2 inches high at the raised center, and is a large example for the type. This gold rosette has a dotted border, with eight round floral pedal designs that run around the central element of the piece. This central element is a green glass inlay that is supported by a raised gold band. There is also an additional dotted decorative band the runs around the central glass inlay. This piece was also hand punched into a mold, thus forming the raised designs that are seen on the front side of this striking piece. There is also a minute centering central dot seen on the back side, which is a Greek convention of art during the 4th century B.C. This complete and intact piece also has some black mineral deposits where this piece likely attached to a garment that may have been votive. There are also minute black and dark brown spotty mineral deposits, along with minute root marks that are seen in various sections of the piece. This piece is also not thin gold sheeting, and is solid with some tensile strength, and this is an indication that this is not solely a votive type piece, and may have been worn on special occasions as well. This piece is a floral design with the raised central green glass element, and the green glass likely represents the center of a flower. This piece is also likely from the Black Sea region, and is analogous to gold plaques that have been found there that have floral designs. (See attached photo of an analogous Greco-Scythian floral rosette that was found near ancient Kerch, south of the Sea of Azov. This piece is approximately the same size as the piece offered here. This piece was published in "The Splendor of Scythian Art" by M.I. Artamonov, New York, 1969, no. 149.) These floral designs can be explained by the Greek Eleusinian cult that flourished in the Black Sea region, and the worship of Demeter and Persephone which represented the "change of the seasons" and "birth and rebirth", and these concepts were also associated with the growth of flowers and agriculture. The scarce to rare piece offered here is seldom seen on the market and has great eye appeal, as this piece has a brilliant color. This piece can also be worn today, as it is a durable solid example, and it can easily be built into a pendant or necklace. This piece also has a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certity that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1258851
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
These two beautiful pieces are two matching solid Greek gold earrings that date to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. These two large examples are approximately 1.2 inches in diameter, and are 1/8 wide at the square terminal ends. These pieces weigh approximately 5.1 grams and 7.7 grams, as one piece has a slightly larger rounded inner hoop diameter, and a slightly larger square terminal end. These large and somewhat heavy pieces were worn through pierced ears, and the square terminal ends held them in place, as the main body of these pieces are rounded to easily run through the pieced ears. These pieces are a scarce type, although they are a simple design, and were easy to adjust to the individual. In this case, the slightly larger inner rounded diameter size of one earring may have been custom made for a wealthy lady in antiquity, who may have had a larger pieced ear hole on one ear than the other. The outer width diameter of both pieces is a perfect match with an approximate diameter of 1.2 inches, although the inner rounded diameter sizes are slightly different from one another, with one hoop slightly thicker than the other. This type of construction is a good indication that these pieces were perhaps custom made for one individual. These pieces are also solid, and have fine etched line design seen on all four sides of the square terminal ends. These pieces also have some minute deposits, extremely minute scratches, and a slight oxidized yellowish patina which is consistent with ancient gold pieces. These solid pieces are also in mint to superb condition with no cracks and/or repair, and are in fact solid enough so that they can even be worn today. These beautiful pieces also hang from a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and have a bright yellow color that can be seen at a great distance. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1388453
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This appealing piece is a Greek terracotta bust that dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C., and is approximately 3 inches high. This large bust is intact, save a small edge chip around the vent hole hole rim seen at the back of the head, and is a terracotta that likely represents a goddess such as Demeter. This goddess is also seen wearing an elaborate and thick diadem, and has a very serene face. Demeter was the mother of Persephone who was responsible for the change of seasons, and the "rebirth" of crops during the year. This piece is in it's natural "as found" condition, and has some spotty earthen and mineral deposits. This piece is a pleasing example for the type, and is mounted on a custom steel and Plexiglas display stand with a total height of approximately 4.7 inches. Ex: Munzen and Medaillen AG, Basel, Switzerland, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1207767
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,865.00
This scarce Pre-Columbian piece is a Mayan cylinder vessel that dates Late Classic, circa 550-950 A.D. This attractive piece is approximately 7 inches high by 4.9 inches in diameter. This superb to mint quality vessel is a "Molded Orangeware Vessel", El Salvador/Honduras region, that has well-defined mold made impressions seen within two box-shaped fields seen on each side of the vessel. Each box-shaped field has a standing Mayan priest/dignitary holding an elongated rectangular object in his extended right hand, and the other panel shows this rectangular object hanging on the right elbow of this standing individual. This standing Mayan priest/dignitary seen within both panels has his head placed within a raptorial beaked bird, which may represent a sacred "Moan Bird", and this raptorial beaked bird is likely a ceremonial headdress. This individual is also seen wearing royal ear flares and bracelets, has a water-lily emerging from his lips, and is wearing a sashed lioncloth. There is also a stippled woven mat pattern seen in the background, and the overall composition on both panels have very sharp details and is better than most examples. In addition, each panel shows this standing individual in a slightly different position, and this design conveys a slight movement of this individual, as one views this exceptional piece from panel to panel. This convention of art relative to Mayan ceramics, is generally seen on scarce to rare Mayan molded vessels of this type. This intact piece also has some attractive light gray burnishing, some minute root marking, and spotty dotted black mineral deposits. An analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Nov. 24, 1986, no. 127. ($1,500.00-$2,500.00 estimates, $2,750.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1374471
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This superb Roman bronze is an applique that shows a facing Diana that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 4.5 inches high, and is complete with no repair/restoration. This piece is a facing Diana, who was the Roman goddess of the hunt, and is seen with a bow quiver over her shoulder, along with a chiton and animal skin cloak that is draped over her left shoulder. She is also seen with a raised hair tie that holds her hair at the top of her head with intricate folds. This attractive bust of Diana displays a very serene face, and has eyes that were likely inlaid with silver. There is also a crescent moon pattern seen at the bottom outer edge of the bust, and this alludes to this goddess, as she was the Roman goddess of the hunt, nature, and the lunar cycle. This piece has an even light green patina with some spotty red highlights, along with some spotty light gray calcite deposits. This piece also was likely a decorative element that may have fit on a furniture piece or box. (For the type se Babelon-Blanchet, "Catalogue des Bronzes Antiques de la Bibliotheque Nationale", Paris, 1895, nos. 140 and 176; and another analogous example is seen in "Art of the Ancient World", Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 1985, no. 312.) This piece sits on a custom marble and Plexiglas stand. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1402085
Apolonia Ancient Art
$625.00
This mint quality Etruscan vessel is a two-handled kotyle type vessel, and dates to the Late Geometric Period, circa 7th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is in mint quality condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece has a slightly indented rim, two applied strap handles, and a ring base with a flat bottom. This piece was made from a light tan terracotta, and has a light orange/red slip with a banded design seen on the inner and outer surfaces. This piece also has some spotty light brown and white calcite mineral deposits, and is in it's natural "as found" condition. This piece is an exceptional example for the type, and the Geometric Period banded design is very attractive. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's-1970's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1038446
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,075.00
This mint quality little Greek stemless kylix is an Attic ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.25 inches high. This intact piece is nearly flawless, and has a nice brilliant deep black glaze, especially on the inside of the bowl. This piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol.12", by B. Sparks and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This piece is scarce in this mint quality condition, is an exceptional example for the type, and has a beautiful thick glozzy black glaze. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1226221
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded piece is approximately 34 mm wide, and weighs 17.1 gms. This attractive piece is well centered and shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in his right hand, and over his left arm, a cloak made from the skin of the Nemean lion. The impressive standing nude Herakles, is also more defined and muscular than what is normally seen, and this coin is a better example than most of the other examples that have been on the market. The (Rev.) also shows a legend in Greek lettering seen on each side of Herakles and below. The lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, and this is likely the case for this coin type, but it may be that the majority of these coins were minted by Thasos for trade with the Thracian interior. The pieces with better artistic style are generally recognized as being from the Thasos mint, as the piece offered here, and the piece offered here has great artistic style for the period. Thasos is a Greek island in the northern Aegean Sea off the coast of Thrace, and was colonized by the Phoenicians for its gold mines. The Phoenicians also established a religious cult on the island to their god Melkart, who later came to be identified with the Greek god Herakles when the island was Hellenized circa 650 B.C. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was also adopted on the subsequent Thracian coinage as well. In 197 B.C., the Romans defeated Philip V of Macedon at the battle of Cynoscephalae, and thus made Thasos a "free" city state. Pliny the Elder was later to describe Thasos as still being a "free" city state in the 1st century A.D. This coin is better than most examples, regarding the artistic style and the impressive muscular Herakles seen on the reverse, and has traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1989. References: Sear 1759. BMC 74 (var.). SNG Copenhagen 1046 (var.). I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357051
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems and large hoops are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately 1.25 inches high, by .25 inches in diameter for the shield emblems. Together the pair weighs 1.5 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems each have a raised central dot, and have a detailed beaded border. The hoops are very simple, and are a single strand that was attached to each of the shield emblems. These pieces are very durable, and can easily be worn today, as there is no clasp. This pair has some minute light red mineralization, and can be easily cleaned if one desires. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry with a simple design, which also displays well with the wearer. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1242856
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive piece is a Greek Attic black-glazed lekythos that dates circa mid 5th century B.C. This piece is in mint condition, with no repair/restoration, and is approximately 3.25 inches high by 3.25 inches in diameter. This piece is near gem quality, as the lustrous deep black glaze is nearly flawless, and the surface of this piece has an even deep black color with a thin multi-colored iridescent patina. This piece also has a beautiful esoteric design, with a gadrooned body with a pattern of incised grooves in the handle zone, and a small rouletted molding at the junction of the shoulder and the flared neck. This piece also has a small flat foot, and a black dotted circle underneath on the bottom. The overall design of this piece also has a geometric esthetic, as the height is equal to the diameter. The flared neck was also designed for greater control pouring the liquid that was held within, and this was likely a precious oil, and the short neck design also made pouring liquid from this vessel very precise as well. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, June 2002, no. 243. ($3,000.00-$5,000.00 estimates, approximately 3.5 inches high. See attached photo.) An additional analogous vessel was sold at Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2006, no. 134. ($2,500.00-$3,500.00 estimates, $3,750.00 realized.) This type of Greek Attic black-glaze ceramic is scarce in this exceptional condition, and is rarely seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1381367
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This intact vessel is a Greek Messapian lidded "lebes gamikos" vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 4.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair and/or restoration, and is superb to mint quality, in addition to being in it's pristine "as found" condition. This piece has some minute root marking and light brown ground deposits, along with a beautiful light brown patina. This piece has two raised handles above the shoulder, a round pedestal base, and a lid with a raised knob in the shape and size of an olive. This piece also has dark brown decorative elements with concentric circles seen on the lid and upper shoulder, and a light brown slip is seen over the main body of the vessel. This dainty little piece is very esoteric and has a very attractive design, and was likely a storage vessel for seeds, olives, and/or grains. A very well made piece with a high degree of eye appeal. An old collection number (0045) is also seen under the lid and base of the vessel. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1940's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: