Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #883507
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This Near Eastern piece is an attractive red carnelian stamp seal that is from the Sassanian culture that lived in modern day Iran. This piece dates circa 2nd-4th century A.D., and served as a personal signet stamp seal which was used to conduct business transactions. This piece has a flat face and has a bow drilled hole in the center, and this piece was probably worn on a cord around the neck. This piece is fragmentary with about half of the piece missing, but the flat face with the seal is intact. The flat face of this piece has an exceptional engraved portrait bust of a bearded noble, who is seen wearing a regal diadem in the hair, and this piece was probably owned by a wealthy individual who traded within the Sassanian Empire. The fine artistic style seen on this piece is better than most examples for the period, and the color is very striking, as the stone has a deep red color. This piece would make an excellent addition to a ring or a pendant. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Ltd., Chicago, Ill. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1392177
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This appealing piece is an Inka bronze tumi that dates circa 1450-1550 A.D., and is approximately 4 inches high, by 3.6 inches wide, by .15 inches thick. This piece is intact and is in mint quality "as found" condition, and has a beautiful dark green patina. This piece also has some light brown earthen deposits, along with some spotty minute dark green mineral deposits that are adhered to sections of the piece. This piece was cast and then hammered into shape, and has a raised edge border that runs down from the curved blade to the base of the piece. This was added to give this piece some added strength, and shows that this piece was made with a great deal of skill. This tumi was also votive, and was likely added into the wrappings of a mummy, or was simply added into a tomb. This piece was likely a symbolic offering, and was also likely a "trade type" piece which served as a form of trade currency. This piece also represented the power of the Inka Empire, and this type of implement was also used for ceremonial sacrifice. A nice complete example with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1393847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,875.00
This mint quality piece is a very large Greek "Messapian" column krater that dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 14.7 inches high, by 13.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This large-scale piece in intact with no repair and/or restoration, and is in it's natural mint quality "as found" condition. This piece has a dark brown body glaze with cream colored highlights, and has an attractive wave pattern seen on the upper shoulder. In addition, this large-scale piece has two lines seen on the lower body above the raised footed base, and triangular cream and dark brown patterns seen on the upper flat handle rims. This piece is a much better example than what is normally seen, as the dark brown body glaze seen on the majority of these "Messapian" pieces is normally worn away. The reason for this is that the dark brown body glaze is usually very thin, as it was generally applied simply as a "wash type" glaze. However, the dark brown body glaze seen on this exceptional example is somewhat thicker, and the overall condition of this piece is also better than most ceramics attributed to this culture. The "Messapian" culture was also a native Greek culture from southern Italy, and their vessels were largely derived from imported Attic models", as cited by A.D. Trendall in "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia", Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 1982, p. 18. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits, and are especially thicker under the raised footed base, and in addition, the piece offered here is also likely a votive example, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition. Pottery classified as "Messapian" also refers to native and/or non-Greek pottery from southern Italy, along with the "Peucetian" and "Daunian" types, but this classification is a bit of a misnomer, as it is probable that "Messapian" ceramics were produced by Greek artists for the local non-Greek populace. This may also explain why this type of large-scale "Messapian" piece is x-rare, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional decorative object. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date,culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #987545
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian trefoil oinochoe that shows an expressive theatrical mask, which is seen in profile facing right, and dates circa 380-350 B.C. This piece is classified as a "Type II Oinochoe", otherwise known as a "Chous", and is approximately 4.6 inches high. This attractive piece is also intact, and is in superb to mint quality condition with no repair/restoration or overpaint. This extremely rare piece has also been attributed to the "Truro Painter", and has very vibrant colors, which are a glossy black, light red, and white. There are also some heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel, on the edge of the trefoil mouth, and on the bottom base ring. The detailed theatrical mask is seen centered within a light red frame which has a floral design at the bottom, and there are several attractive white dot highlights seen within this light red frame as well. The lively theatrical mask depicted on this piece is a type used by a character in a Greek comedy play known as a "phylax play", and this type of "phylax mask" was designed with bushy black hair, short black beard, open mouth, and copious facial wrinkles. This type of "phylax mask" was defined by Trendall as "Type B", and this type of mask was often produced by the "Truro Painter", circa 380-350 B.C., on Greek Apulian chous vessels of this type. Trendall also stated that the heads of the Truro Painter "often wear white head-bands", and the detailed theatrical "phylax mask" seen on the piece offered here also has a very prominent white head-band. (See A.D. Trendall, "Phlyax Vases", Second Edition, BICS Supplement 20, 1967. Another vessel of this type is seen in the Virginia Museum in Richmond, Virginia, no. 81.53.) The expressive theatrical "phylax mask" seen on the beautiful vessel offered here, and the Virginia Museum vessel noted above, are both designed as a singular depiction, and as such, is a subject type seldom seen on Greek Apulian vessels. In addition, the "phylax mask" seen here on this rare vessel is a sharp detailed example which is seldom seen on the market today. An analogous Apulian chous of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no.195. (Approximately 7.5 inches high, $5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates, $12,500.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Donna Jacobs Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan, circa 1980's. Ex: Robert Novak collection, St. Louis, MO. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1402388
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This Thasos silver tetradrachm coin is mint state (FDC) grade, and dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This mint quality piece is approximately 33 mm wide, and weighs 16.9 gms. This piece is well centered on the reverse, and is slightly off center on the obverse, and features on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus, wreathed with grape leaves and bunches. The reverse (Rev.) shows a spectacular very muscular and nude standing Herakles, and is one of the best examples for the type. The reverse die of this coin is one of the best for the entire series, and this coin was struck with a fresh reverse punch die, and a worn obverse anvil die. This coin was also likely struck shortly before a fresh obverse die was added, and there are also very few coins of this type with this very desirable reverse die showing a detailed and very muscular Herakles. It's also very likely that the coin offered here is the finest recorded representation of a very muscular and nude standing Herakles for the Greek Thasos series. The hair of Herakles is very detailed with a dotted design, and the minute facial details are clearly defined as well. There is also Greek lettering to the right that reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which refers to the island of Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This piece has great artistic style for the period, and there are few recorded reverses with this reverse die that features a more muscular and detailed Herakles as the example offered here. An exceptional coin with some traces of mint luster. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. References: Sear 1759 var. BMC 74 var. SNG Cop 1046. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1398614
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This scarce piece is a Roman bronze military horse saddle cinch handle that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 3.3 inches long, by 2.7 inches wide at the terminal end, by 1.7 inches high at the ring attachment. This piece is a scarce to rare example with no repair and/or restoration, and was mounted on a leather strap that was fitted to a Roman saddle. There are two holes seen at one end that held rivets for the leather strap, and the terminal end has two flaring dotted ends that allowed one to firmly grip this handle. There is also a raised ring that locked this handle in place with another strap. This entire piece was also made to firmly wrap around the attached leather strap which tucked deeply into the handle. The overall design of this piece is very practical, and is a scarce Roman military cavalry piece not often seen on the market. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty light brown mineral deposits. For the type of a Roman military cavalry saddle see: "The Roman Cavalry" by Karen Dixon and Pat Southern, Barnes and Noble Books Pub., 2000. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1385777
Apolonia Ancient Art
$425.00
This complete piece is a Roman bronze oil lamp cover in the form of a facing Medusa head, and dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches in diameter, by .28 inches high in relief. This piece was cast as one solid piece, and has a concave back side and the front side has the facing head of Medusa with long flowing hair. The face is extremely rounded with no facial expression, and has a cloak tie seen below the chin. In addition, there is an indented hole at the top with a bar which served as an opening for a swivel attachment. This piece covered a hole in a bronze oil lamp, and moved up and down over the hole. This piece has a lovely dark green patina, and has very sharp detail, especially with the eyes that have raised hollow pupils that are very noticeable. This piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is a large example for the type. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand, can easily be removed, and also can be worn as a pendant. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1310457
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This interesting piece is a Greek Attic "Red-Figure" kylix that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 3.6 inches high, and is 10 inches wide from handle to handle. This nice Attic ceramic is classified as a "Red-Figured, Type C" kylix, and is attributed to the "Painter of London D12", who is a rare Attic painter that is seldom seen on the market. This piece is intact, save for an ancient break in the stem section of the stemmed footed base, and was repaired in antiquity with a bronze and lead pin. It's quite possible that this piece was broken in antiquity while playing the drinking game "kottabos", which was played at a drinking party known as a "symposium". This game was played by spinning the kylix on the index finger in order to fling the wine dregs swirling in the bottom of the cup onto a target in the room. Obviously, many kylix drinking cups were broken while playing this game. The ancient bronze and lead pin is approximately 2 inches long, and reattached the stemmed base to the main body of the piece. One end of the pin can also be seen on the inner surface in the middle of the tondo, and the other end can be seen centered within the stemmed base on the bottom side. The original owner must have thought enough of this attractive piece to have had it repaired for use again. This piece has a seated young man facing right within the round tondo, and is seen wearing a himation (cloak). The facial details of this young man are very detailed, and his pleasing young face is easily seen. The cloak also has curved definition lines, and a single thick black line that defines the garment edge, and both of these artistic features are artistic features of the early 5th century. It's quite possible that this piece may be attributed to an earlier painter such as "Makron", due to the artistic features noted above, rather than a slightly later painter such as the "Painter of London D12". The exterior surface has a lustrous black glaze, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal, and is an exceptional piece that is also a scarce example with an ancient repair. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 1994, no. 109. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315774
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This lustrous piece is a Greek Attic skyphos cup that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 3 inches high, by 6.3 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and has a rich even black lustrous surface that is seen both on the outer and inner surfaces. In addition, the black glaze is complete on the inner surface which also points to the fine workmanship of this vessel. This piece also has some minute spotty white calcite deposits, and some minute root marking seen in sections of this piece. The lustrous black glazed surface also has a multi-colored iridescent patina. This piece also has a flat base, and two attached strap handles. This piece is an exceptional example, is in mint to superb condition, and is better than most examples of the type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Traditional Collectibles : Books : References : Fine Art : Contemporary item #1010631
Apolonia Ancient Art
$325.00
This "Pre-Columbian Art of Mexico and Central America" book by Hasso von Winning is in mint condition, and is a "must have" reference book for collectors, museum curators, and art history students of Pre-Columbian art from Mexico and central America. This crisp, mint first edition is lavishly illustrated with superb examples from all the primary cultures of the entire Central American and Mexican region. This book is organized first by geographic area, and within that area, the primary cultural groups are classified in chronological order. There is a brief overview of the archaeology of each primary geographical area, and then a discussion of the highlights of the artifacts in that area all by chronological order. Each object is photographed in the book, many in beautiful color, and by professional art photographers. In addition, each object is accurately described with its date and dimension. Many of the objects were published for the first time in this book, and many of the objects are from private collections from around the world. It is important to note that this book was published prior to the US and UNESCO patrimony regulations. This book is also utilized by the major auction houses such as Sotheby's, Christies, and Bonhams as a primary reference for objects represented at auction. This book is also the companion book for "Pre-Columbian Art of South America" by Alan Lapiner. The book offered here was published in January 1968 by Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 388 pages with text, 595 illustrations, 175 photos in full color and many are mounted. Hardbound with dust jacket, including the clear protective cover for the dust jacket. ISBN: 0810904233.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398232
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This complete and interesting piece is an Egyptian-Phoenician carved hard stone beetle scarab that dates to the 25th-27th Dynasties, circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches long, by .8 inches wide, by .5 inches high, and is a complete and solid example. This piece was carved from a hard stone, and has a light brown/yellow patina with some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is an extremely fine example for the type, and has clear carved lines relative to the body of the beetle seen on the top side, and the images seen on the flat back side. The flat back side has a carved winged dotted disk seen above, a horned animal at each side, a rabbit below, and a horned ram's head at the center. These animals may also represent reproduction and the continuance of life, and for the ancient Egyptians, the scarab beetle represented rebirth and regeneration. This type of piece was also copied by the Phoenicians who used this type of piece in jewelry. This piece has a bow-drilled hole that runs through the center, and this piece may have been part of a necklace, and may also have served as a votive burial object. Objects of this type for this period were usually made from faience, and were not carved from a hard stone as this fine example. This piece also has a custom display stand, and one can turn this piece to show both sides as well. For the type see: John Boardman, "Classical Phoenician Scarabs: A Catalog and Study", Archaeopress, 2003. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1395146
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
These Bactrian Near Eastern and rare (50) fifty triangular fittings are carved from a hard limestone, and are approximately 2500-1800 B.C. These pieces are approximately .80-1.1 inches high, by .20 inches thick, and are all triangular shaped with a "notched rounded edge" that runs around the edge of each piece. These appealing and decorative pieces also have an attractive light to dark gray patina, and are all intact, save for five pieces that have repaired breaks. These pieces are in remarkable condition, as they could easily be damaged and/or shattered simply by dropping them on a hard surface, as they are relatively thin limestone plaques. The principle reason they are in their superb to mint quality "as found" condition, is that they were likely inlaid into an object such as a wooden box, a furniture piece, or possibly even the face of a wooden shield. A number of these pieces also have have a more pronounced patina on one side than the other, and this may also be an indication that these pieces were embedded into a perishable object as noted above. These pieces are a nice group of individually carved objects with a high degree of eye appeal. These pieces are also offered with a custom display case/frame, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #579338
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,625.00
This x-large Roman glass jug dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches high by 5.8 inches in diameter. This beautiful piece is also in mint condition, with no stress cracks and/or chips. This pleasing light green vessel has beautiful multi-colored iridescence and nice minute root marking. There are also five decorative wheel-cut (lathe) bands that run around the main body of the piece, and these bands may also have served as a measurement indicator of the level of the contained liquid. This was likely the case, as the five cut bands are evenly spaced on the vessel. There is also a thick strap handle that was applied to the upper shoulder and below the lip. The lip of this attractive vessel was also turned out and down, which formed a rounded edge. (For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no.213. This vessel is approximately 9.25 inches high, and has eleven decorative wheel-cut bands, three of which are deeply cut. $20,000.00-$30,000.00 estimates, and realized $23,500.00. Another recent comparable sold at Cristie's Antiquities, London, April 2010, no. 98, for 5625 Pounds, approximately $7600.00, and had 5,700-7,900 pounds estimates. This vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high and is a light green color with six decorative wheel-cut bands. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional large example of early Roman blown glass, is very analogous to the two examples noted above, and is scarce in this mint quality condition. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1226370
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,865.00
This beautiful piece is a Graeco-Roman bronze that dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This complete piece is approximately 3.5 inches high, and stands by itself on it's own base. This type of nude female Graco-Roman piece is known as the "Aphrodite Anadyomene", whose name signifies the birth of the goddess from the foam of the sea. The Greek goddess Aphrodite was born from the sea foam created when the severed genitals of Uranus were cast into the sea. Like many other naked figures of the goddess Aphrodite, the "Anadyomene" was not posed to conceal the body, and has arms raised to the hair which exposes the body to the gaze. In the Hellenistic and Roman periods, each hand is seen lifting and/or wringing the wet hair strands that hang down to the shoulders, as Aphrodite was seen rising from the sea at her birth. Her head is also seen slightly bent, her face is generally seen with a long straight nose with a small mouth, and she usually has wide hips and thighs. All of these features noted above create an impression of youthful fertility, and portray Aphrodite as having eternal youth and beauty. The piece offered here displays all of these features, and in addition, the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" is portrayed in a "contrapposto pose", with the weight carried on one leg with a slight twist to the waist. For the type, see Margarete Bieber, "The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age", New York: Columbia University Press, 1955. The piece offered here has the features attributed to the "Aphrodite Anadyomene" sculptural type as noted above, including the rolled hair that is seen coiled into a bun with a small tie at the front. The piece seen here is an exceptional example of the type, as the face is very sensual with the long nose and slight smile. This piece is also complete, is cast with it's own base, and is intact with a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights. This piece is scarce on the market in this complete and superb condition, and it also sits on an included custom Plexiglas stand. Ex: Frank Sternberg collection, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Antiqua Ancient Art, Los Angeles, CA. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1375688
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This large piece is a Greek Attic "Black-figure" kylix that dates circa 5th century B.C., and is approximately 2.4 inches high, by 11 inches wide from handle to handle. This mint quality piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and has an even dark glossy black glaze. This lustrous black glaze is seen on the inner and outer surfaces, save the bottom of the kylix that has a light red terracotta reserve. The surfaces also have an attractive multi-colored iridescence patina seen in various sections of the vessel, and there is a dark orange and black palmette tondo seen in the bottom center of the vessel. This piece also has a ring base, and an offset shoulder seen on the inside of the vessel. An analogous example was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, May, 1987, no. 258. ($400.00-$700.00 estimates, and is a smaller example.) A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1316847
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This attractive piece is a Roman gold ring that dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. This piece is approximately ring size 3.25, and has a 9/16 inch inner diameter. This piece is complete, and has an attractive blue-green glass inlay set within the raised bezel. There are also some spotty dark to light gray mineral deposits seen on the outer surface of the glass, along with some thick dark brown deposits. The glass inlay is a glass paste that was hardened within the bezel in antiquity. This complete piece was made for a young adult, likely a child, and is a solid gold piece. This piece can easily be worn today, as the glass inlay is very solid, along with the gold hoop and bezel. A piece with nice eye appeal that is also in it's natural "as found" condition. A ring box is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as o date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1393793
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This mint quality Greek Paestan "applied red-figure" hydria dates circa 360-350 B.C., and is approximately 11.2 inches high. This piece is attributed to the Asteas-Python workshop, and is an early piece with many attributes of the Asteas painter. This lovely hydria is in flawless condition, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the back of the piece that has a large palmate fan design. The front of this piece has two figures, one seated woman at the right that is seen nude from the waist up holding a mirror, and a standing draped woman that is seen holding a fillet. The upper shoulder has a beautiful "ivy leaf and berry" wreath design that runs around the vessel, and meets with a rosette at the front center of the piece. There are also two female busts, one seen under each handle, and one appears to be older than the other, and may represent Demeter, and her daughter Persephone. This piece also has a deep black glaze, and this thick even glaze is also seen running down inside the raised neck as well. This piece has attributes that are attributed to the Asteas painter such as: identical line design of the woman's busts seen under each handle that have incised hair and upper shoulder incised drapery, extended chins, thick lower lips, and large dotted eyes. In addition, the standing woman seen on the front side has a single stripe running down the drapery, and the seated nude woman has a thin waist and elongated upper torso. All of these attributes are classified as being attributed to early Asteas ceramics as seen in A.D. Trendall, "The red-Figured Vases of Paestum", British School at Rome, pp. 63-80. Michael Padgett of Princeton University also commented that this vessel was produced with the "applied red-figure" production technique, rather than the "red-figure" production technique, and both production techniques are entirely different. The "red-figure" ceramics were produced with the black glaze outlining where the figures went on the piece, and the red glaze was then added on this reserve. With the "applied red-figure" production technique, the black glaze covered the entire vessel, and the red glaze was applied over the black glaze. Incised detailing was sometimes added to the figures, as was the case regarding the lovely vessel offered here, and these pieces are rare to extremely rare. Consequently, this intact piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional early example attributed to the Asteas painter workshop. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Royal Athena Gallery, New York, and Published in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases", Nov. 1990, no. 166 (Listed at $9,500.00). Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This mint quality and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. The facial features of this appealing piece have fine detail, and also have a rather haunting and mysterious look. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: