Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1386365
Apolonia Ancient Art
$385.00
This piece is a Greco-Roman lead horse that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 1.5 inches long, by 1.25 inches high. This piece was a "votive" type object, and was likely sold to the devoted as solely a votive object for dedication at a shrine or grave. This horse may also represent a racing type horse, or one that was tied to a chariot, and may be part of a complete object such as a chariot. This piece was cast from two halves, and was mold made. The horse is complete, save for three of the lower legs, and is a better example that what is recorded, as it is scarce to rare. This piece also has nice detail with the head, and there are reigns that are visible on the neck and body. This piece is also likely Thracian in origin, as votive lead plaques were common for the period and region as well. This piece also has an attractive dark to light gray patina, with spotty dark black and brown highlights. This piece also is mounted on a custom display stand, and has nice eye appeal. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1357998
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This attractive and flawless Roman glass vessel is a brilliant green colored jar that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D., and is approximately 3.7 inches high, by 3.2 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is in mint condition, with no minute cracks and/or chips. The color is very attractive, and has a brilliant light green patina over a dark green glass. The patina also has a bright multi-colored iridescence that is seen on the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. This piece also has four dark blue-green applied handles that attach to the vessel at three points, and this design also makes these handles very durable, along with the main body of the vessel. This piece has a raised stem base, and a flared collar-like neck that extends upwards away from the rounded body. The overall design of this beautiful vessel also made this vessel very easy to handle and grasp. Another analogous vessel of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, "Ancient Glass", London, 1985, no. 34. (2,000.00-3,000.00 Pounds estimates, 2,808 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) For the type see John Hayes, "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum", Toronto, 1975, no. 444. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1338969
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This rare piece is a Chontal culture stone anthropomorphic pendant that dates circa 600-200 B.C., and is approximately 5.5 inches high, by 4 inches deep, by 2.3 inches wide. This interesting piece shows a face emerging from a half moon object that resembles a "crescent half-moon", but this object more likely represents a fruit or a vegetable type, such as a head of maize or a squash. The top of the piece has a segmented extension with a curled end, and this resembles the terminal end of a vegetable type plant where it was connected to the root. The base of the piece also has a curled end which may represent the other terminal end of the vegetable type plant. The well-defined face is seen emerging from the center of the vegetable type plant, and both sides of the face appear to have folded back plant material that frames the face. This facial framed border is comprised of individual "string line-cuts" that are seen in stark contrast to the smooth polished surfaces of the emerging face. The face also has a well defined mouth, nose, and bow drilled eyes. There are two additional bow-drilled holes seen on the top back side, and this allowed this piece to suspend as a pendant, and perhaps this piece was the central element in a sacred necklace. The ancient Chontal created sacred stone pieces such as this piece that were believed to posses magical and fertility powers. This piece is made from a beautiful greenish-brown stone with orange flecks, and in addition, is a scarce to rare stone type which is normally associated with "Chontal" type pieces, rather than "Mexcala" type pieces. For another piece with this scarce to rare stone type see: "In the Heart of Pre-Columbian America, The Gerard Geiger Collection", Milan, 2003, no. 102. (This piece is a mask with notched sides as the piece offered here. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is also analogous to another Chontal mask that has a face designed in profile that is very analogous to the piece offered here. (This piece is also seen in the reference noted above, no. 99. See attached photo.) The piece offered her is much rarer than the more common Chontal masks, as it was designed as a pendant, and the anthropomorphic design with the emerging face is seldom seen. This type of piece may also represent a "transformation" type piece, which also conveys a completely different spiritual meaning than the majority of Chontal masks. This piece also sits on a custom metal stand. Ex: Merrin Gallery, Inv. #680, New York, NY, circa 1980's. Ex: Ebnother collection, Schaffhausen, Germany, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is provided to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1385660
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This powerful piece is a bronze Luristan panther head finial piece that dates circa 1000-650 B.C., and is approximately 2 inches high. This complete piece is the terminal end for a finial that may have been part of a staff, or a section of a horse or wagon fitting. The panther head image seen here is very powerful, and has an open roaring mouth, a flat front nose, and rounded ears seen at the back of the head. This type of piece was also a "protector" type piece, and was integrated with the "Master of the Animals Cult" that was prevalent with this culture. This piece is a solid cast example, and is rather heavy, as there is no hollow core. This piece also has a lovely dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights, along with some minute white calcite deposits. Overall, a nice example with an exceptional patina which is also an excellent mark of authenticity. This piece is also solidly mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. Collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1303911
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This mint quality Roman glass "sprinkler" flask dates circa 3rd century A.D., and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This piece is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 2.25 inches wide at the upper rim. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has a wider rim than what is usually seen. This piece has an exceptional patina, and is a light blue-green color, and has thick dark brown/black deposits that are seen over a brilliant multi-colored iridescent surface. The extra large wide rim seen on this vessel allowed for added control while pouring and/or sprinkling the contained liquid, and served as a palette for the liquid. This piece was also mold made from two halves, and the main body of this vessel has an impressed lattice-work "diamond pattern" type design. This attractive design is also very detailed, and the intricate "diamond pattern" design also imitates a surface texture that is very similar to that of pine cones. The pine cone was also a Greco-Roman symbol that was associated with the Greek god Dionysus, and the Roman god Bacchus. (For the type see: "Shining Vessels, Ancient Glass from Greek and Roman Times", Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, 1991, no. 93, $2,500.00 estimate.) This piece is also scarce in this pristine condition. A custom display stand is also included with this piece. Ex: New York private collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1368965
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional and rare mint state (FDC) Roman gold aureus was minted in Rome, and dates circa 145 A.D. This coin is graded FDC/FDC (mint state), is 7.32 g., and is approximately 20mm. The coin also has perfect centering, extremely high relief, and a great deal of eye appeal. This coin features on the obverse, a young Faustina Junior facing left, with FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL around. She is seen wearing detailed drapery, with layers of hair tucked up into a bun with dotted pearls. Her portrait is simply magnificent, and her face conveys a serene expression. The reverse features a walking dove facing right on a ground line, with CONCORDIA around. This magnificent coin was also struck under her father Antoninus Pius, and commemorated the April 145 A.D. marriage of Annia Galeria Faustina Junior to her material cousin Marcus Aurelius. At the time of the engagement, Antoninus also formally adopted Marcus Aurelius as his heir. The dove on the reverse represents harmony for a stable marriage, as the dove is known to be monogamous throughout its lifetime. A magnificent coin that is likely the finest known for its type. References: RIC III 503b; Strack 507; Calico 2044c; Biaggi 922; BMCRE 1090. Ex: Private UK collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, no. 730. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378231
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This piece is an Egyptian wooden mummy mask that dates to the Late Period, circa 700-30 B.C. This wooden piece is approximately 8.3 inches high, by 5.3 inches wide, and is a solid example. This pleasing "two-part" piece has a nose attached to the main body of the piece with two wooden dowels, and there are six additional dowels that attached the mask to the coffin lid. Five of these dowels are still in place, and in addition, there is a single dowel seen below the chin that was used to attach the mask to an extended wooden beard. The eyes and eye brows were created with angular cuts, in addition to the upper wig. The face also was applied with a thick white gesso, and thick amounts of it can be seen in various sections of the face. This esoteric face also has a slight smile, and has a great deal of eye appeal. The backside of the mask is flat, as it was attached to the coffin lid. This piece is a superb example with it's sectional dowel construction, and likely was made for a young man. This attractive piece also comes with a custom display stand. Ex: Collection of Swanhild Castle, Brooklyn, New York, circa 1960's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #1313572
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is a massive Roman glass bottle that dates circa 2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 12.1 inches high, and is in flawless condition with no cracks and/or chips. This beautiful piece is a pale blue-green color, is free blown, and has a slightly indented "dimple base". This piece also has a long cylindrical neck that is constricted at the lower end, and has a flanged "roll-band" below the rounded rim. This "roll-band" was designed to act as an aid for a portable seal over the opening, such as an animal skin or textile seal. This large-scale piece was also likely a storage vessel for a precious oil or unguent. This piece has a beautiful multi-colored iridescent patina, exceptional smooth surfaces, and some minute root marking. Large-scale Roman blown glass vessels like this example took a great deal of skill to produce, and large-scale pieces with balanced symmetry like this example are rare on the market. In addition, flawless examples like this piece are also not often seen as well. A rare and exceptional large-scale piece that has an interesting design with a brilliant multi-colored patina. Ex: Private Geneva, Switzerland, collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 138. ($6,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates.) Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre 1492 item #1224239
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,675.00
This superb Roman bronze of Attis dates circa 2nd-3rd century A.D., and is approximately 5 inches high by 3.5 inches high. This intact piece is in superb to mint condition, and is complete with no repair/restoration. This piece also has silver inlaid eyes which add to the lively and animated facial expression of this exceptional Roman bronze. This piece also has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute black mineral deposits, fine hair detail, and a finely designed Phrygian cap. There is a round hook at the back of the neck which may have been attached to a suspension chain, as this piece may have been part of a suspended bronze vessel or a furniture object. There is additional detail with incised dotted decorative crosses and line work seen on each side of the Phyrgian cap, which is also an attribute associated with the deity Attis. The head of this piece is also modeled in the round, and extends slightly forward from the lower bust, and this is another indication that this piece was likely attached to a rounded vessel. In addition, the majority of Roman applique pieces are not modeled in the round in the upper section like the example offered here, and simply have an open end at the back of the head. This piece therefore has a dual design, not only as an applique, but it is also designed like a Roman portrait bust. According to Phyrgian and Roman myth, the youth Attis was madly loved by the Phyrgian goddess Cybele, and she loved him so jealously that she could not bear him marrying the nymph Sagaritis. When Attis later proposed to Sagaritis, in a rage, she made him go out of his mind, and he castrated himself and died from his wound. Cybele, struck with grief, revived her dead lover and the pair were worshipped together throughout Phrygia and the Roman world. In a Lydian version of the myth, Attis is not killed by his castration, but by a wild boar, like Adonis. For the myth of Attis and Cybele see: "Gods and Mortals in Classical Mythology" by Michael Grant, New York, 1979. The lively and animated face seen on this appealing piece, reveals the mad love that Attis had for Cybele and Sagaritis, and as such, this piece displays a high degree of art. This piece hangs on a custom black plexiglas and steel stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. Note: Additional documentation is available to the buyer. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357105
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with hemispherical shields are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These lovely pieces are approximately .68 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the hemispherical shields are approximately .25 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 1.6 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The hemispherical shields have a smooth facing surface, and have a great deal of eye appeal because of their simplicity of design. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. These pieces are a nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and have a pleasing eye appeal. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, no. 43. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1162134
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,235.00
This interesting piece is an Aztec flint blade which dates circa 1400-1525 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches high by 2.5 inches wide, and is a large example for the type. This piece is intact, save for a minute chip at one end, and has a beautiful light brown patina with some spotty black mineral deposits. This piece has a small hole near the center of the piece, and this hole is full of minute crystals which are imbedded in the inner cavity, and run to the outer edge of the hole on each side of the piece. It's quite possible that the small hole with crystals was formed from constant mineral drippings, as this piece may have been a ceremonial offering that was buried in a cave or underground tomb. It is interesting to note that the crystals not only extend to the outer edge on each side of the hole, but also over both edges on each side of the piece, and onto the outer carved/chipped planes of the outer flat surfaces near the edge of each side of the hole. This is an indication that the crystal mineralization, and the hole seen on this piece, developed after this piece was carved and buried. The patina and the mineralization are also excellent indicators which go far in establishing the authenticity of this piece, and there are many forgeries of this type of piece that have been on the market. The carving of this piece is exceptional and very well detailed as well, as one can easily see that the carved/chipped planes become smaller towards the edge of the piece, and this forms a blade of elliptical form that has extremely sharp edges. Aztec blades of this type have been used as a lance or knife blade, but the piece offered here was likely used only in a votive context. The flint stone of this piece is also semi-translucent, and according to Eduardo Matos Moctezuma in "The Great Temple of the Aztecs: Treasures of Tenochtitlan", Thames and Hudson Pub., London, 1988, p. 97: "Many objects of flint and obsidian, locally available raw materials, were also made by the Aztec artisans to be deposited in caches. Flint was most frequently chipped into knives and blades. Some of these knives were decorated with with bits of shell and stone mosaic to form little faces in profile, resembling representations of the flint day sign in the Borbonicus. Similarly, obsidian (a volcanic glass) was chipped to form knives and blades with sharp cutting edges, but it was also carefully worked and polished into miniature imitations, such as small heads and rattles of the rattlesnake. Obsidian is an extremely dense and glassy stone, and is a difficult material to work; such miniatures attest to the skill of the Aztec craftsmen. While flint and obsidian implements symbolically and functionally evoke sacrifice and death, more overt evidence of ritual acts can be found in the numerous examples of worked crania. Sometimes a flint knife is placed between the teeth, like a tongue projecting from a grinning mouth, at other times another knife is inserted into the nasel cavity to create an animated image of death. We do not know wheather these objects were used as masks in rituals, or wheather they were made as symbols of death and sacrifice to be placed in offerings." (See attached photo from the text above, p. 98, ill. 80, of a skull mask with two analogous flint blades such as the example offered here.) The piece offered here was likely cermonial and was votive, but in exactly what context it was used, that is not certain, but whatever the case, the piece offered here is an extremely interesting and rare example of the type. This piece also comes with a custom wooden display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private North Carolina collection, circa 1990's. Ex: H. Rose collection, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363783
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This superb Greek bronze coin is an (AE 17) that is from the city of Mesembria, and dates circa 4th-3rd century B.C. This coin is approximately 17mm in diameter, weighs 5.8 grams, and is in superb condition (EF+/EF+). This coin also has a beautiful dark green patina, perfect centering, excellent metal, and high relief. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin has an excellent image of a Greek "Attic type" helmet, which was the favorite helmet type of elite cavalry units forged by Alexander the Great. This coin also has perfect centering, and the full crest of the helmet is seen on the flan, which is not often completely seen relative to this coin type. The reverse (Rev.) features an Celtic war shield, and has Greek lettering above and below, which also names the city Mesembria. This lettering is also complete, as this coin has perfect centering, and is not often seen on this coin type. The city of Mesembria was a Greek colony in Thrace on the Black Sea coast, and traded in slaves, and agricultural products. This coin is an exceptional example, is one of the better recorded examples with perfect centering, and has details not often seen both on the obverse and reverse. References: SNG BM 276. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1276518
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a scarce Greek Mycenaean bronze double-ax head that dates circa 1400-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 6.3 inches long, by 2.25 inches high near the end of each blade. This piece is very solid, as it was cast as one piece, and because of it's heavy weight, it was well served as a heavy battle ax. This piece also had added strength, as the inner shank design is "V" shaped, and is not a round circle as most examples of this type have. This "V" designed inner shank provided for added strength relative to it's attachment to the shaft, and this design made this a powerful weapon, as this design gave added leverage to the warrior while striking a blow. This design also points to the fact that this piece was likely made for battle, rather than being made purely as a votive object after the death of the warrior. However, there is a strong possibility that this piece not only may have served in battle, but it was also used as a votive offering as well. This weapon was the principle weapon of the Mycenaean Greeks and was probably used during the Trojan War. This type of bronze weapon is also scarce to rare, because bronze during this period was very valuable, and bronze objects that were damaged and/or had lost their utility were often melted down into another bronze weapon or object. The shape of this heavy battle ax may have originated in Crete with the Minoan culture, circa 2000 B.C., as double-ax head weapons and plaques have been excavated at Knossos. This shape may also refer to the Minoan bull-jumping cult, as the ends of the double-ax may have represented the horns of the bull. A number of votive gold double-axes, found in Arkalochori in Crete, are of the same shape as the example offered here. This piece has a beautiful dark green/blue patina with some heavy dark green/brown mineral deposits, and is in mint to superb "as found" condition with no breaks. This piece also has a relatively sharp blade edge, and there is little or no wear over the entire piece. For the type see "Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston", by M. Comstock and C. Vermeule III, 1971, no. 1630. The example offered here is very analogous to the example sold in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2002, no. 18. ($5,000.00-$8,000.00 estimates, $5,975.00 realized. See attached photo.) Another example was offered by Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, for $7500.00. (See the exhibit catalog "Venerable Traditions", published Nov. 2007, no. 26. See attached photo.) Another example was also offered by Charles Ede Ltd., London, published in Greek Antiquities, 2006, no. 37. (4,000.00 Pound estimate.) The attractive piece offered here sits on a custom display stand, and can easily lift off. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, circa 2000-2014. Inv.# P33-039-101514c. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1363343
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This dainty and superb piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates to the 5th-4th century B.C. This lovely piece is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter through the center of the vessel. This piece features an elongated strap handle that is approximately 5.5 inches high, from the top of the handle to where it attaches to the main body of the vessel. This strap handle also has two small, finely worked rivets that attach this handle to the lip of the vessel, and a heart shaped applique, on the other end of the handle, which is attached to the main body of the vessel. This piece has a flat bottom and stands very stable, as this piece is well balanced. This exceptionally well designed piece also has a raised lip that allowed for better control of a precious liquid, such as an oil-based unguent, and this may also have been the primary function of the raised elongated strap handle. This piece likely served as an accessory for a woman's toilet cabinet, and is an extremely rare to rare design with this elongated handle. This piece has a beautiful dark and light green patina with dark red highlights, and has some spotty dark green mineral deposits. This piece is also intact, has no repair/restoration, and the raised strap handle is remarkably intact and complete. An exceptional Greek bronze vessel that is also a rare type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315451
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This large and impressive piece is a Greek bronze horse that dates to the Geometric Period, circa 8th century B.C. This exceptional and large example is approximately 3.4 inches high, by 3.65 inches long. This complete piece is in superb condition, with no cracks and/or breaks, and the overall surface is very even with a beautiful dark green patina. There is some dark green/brown mineral deposits seen mostly on the bottom side of the base plate, and overall, this piece has a great deal of eye appeal due to it's beautiful dark green patina and even surfaces. This esoteric piece is designed with an elongated tail and legs, which are attached to the base plate that has ten triangular openings. The triangular openings in the base plate arranged into two rows, along with the base plate extension to accommodate for the attachment of the tail, stylistically point to a "Laconian" manufacture. (See another analogous "Laconian" example in "Glories of the Past: Ancient Art from the Shelby White and Leon Levy Collection", Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1990, no. 72.) The piece offered here also has a tubular designed torso and elongated nose, and the elongated nose has two raised mounds seen just in front of the ears that represent the eyes of the horse. The type of horse seen here may be the "Laconian Type" for the reasons noted above, but there are also no knobs seen on the legs that represent knee joints, and this type of design is seen mostly on the "Thessalian Type". The type of Greek geometric bronze horse offered here, with the openwork integral plinths, were votive offerings in the Geometric Period, and are found widespread throughout the ancient Greek world. However, large examples in the superb condition offered here are quite rare, and not often have the beautiful deep emerald green patina that is seen on this exceptional example. (Another analogous example of the same size and condition was also offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2012, no. 61., $40,000.00-$60,000.00 estimates, $50,000.00 realized. See attached photo.) This beautiful piece also sits on a custom display stand. A large example, with great surfaces and a beautiful dark green patina, which together make this exceptional piece one of the finest examples available on the market today. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1382235
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This exceptional piece is a mint quality Late Corinthian Greek exaleiptron, and dates circa 550-500 B.C. This piece is approximately 5.5 inches in diameter, by 6.25 wide including the single handle, by 2.1 inches high, and is a mint quality vessel with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is also known as a kothon and/or plemochoe, and was a ceremonial vessel that held a liquid used for libations and/or offerings. The unique design, with the outer sides curved into the inner center of the vessel, prevented the liquid from spilling. This piece has a detailed black "dotted" band seen on the upper shoulder, and a "zig-zag pattern" seen on the outer edge of the single strap handle. In addition, there is a finely detailed "rosette pattern" seen on the inside bottom within a black field. The main body rests on a raised ring base, and within the bottom ring base is a marvelous red and black vibrant "pin-wheel pattern". There are also red concentric circles seen on the outer surface, along with a "ray-pattern" seen above the ring base. The entire vessel is intricately designed, as it was a votive type vessel. This yellow-tan vessel also has some spotty light brown deposits, and has exceptional "as found" surfaces. An exceptional vessel, and one of the best recorded examples. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1960's. Ex: Arete Gallery, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 1980's. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1990's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is included for the purchaser, including EU Export, US Customs Import documentation, and an authentication letter from Arete Gallery, circa 1985.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1399107
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,375.00
This rare and extremely large Cycladic "Stargazer" Kilia type marble head dates circa 3300-2500 B.C., and is approximately 3.75 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high. This piece was once part of a complete standing idol, and the dating of these idols is difficult, although it is clear that they belong to the late Chalcolithic Period. This piece is an extremely large example, as most examples are less than half the size of the piece offered here, and as such, is a rare to extremely rare example. This piece was broken at the top of the neck, and has a break at the back of the head, and is a head that is approximately 80% complete. The popular name of "stargazer" comes from the obvious backward tilt of the head, and the small bulging eyes are set rather high. Most of the extremely rare complete idols have been broken across the neck, as seen here, suggesting that these sculptures were ritually "killed" at the time of burial. The exact function of these idols is unknown, but the design of these pieces do evoke a sense of modern design with a simplistic artistic style. This piece has a very defined raised nose, and there is small flat section at the base of this bust where it was attached to the neck of the figure. This piece also has spotty and heavy dark gray mineral deposits; and at the break at the back of the head, along with the neck break at the base of the head, the marble is crystallized with some light gray deposits. The patina seen on the break at the back of the head is also an indication that this extremely large piece was not only broken away at the neck, but is was also ritually "killed" with an extra break at the back of the head. This esoteric piece has a custom display stand which shows this piece as it would have looked attached to the main body of the piece. (For the type see: Takaoglu, Turan. "A Chalcolithic Marble Workshop at Kulaksizlar in Western Anatolia: An Analysis of Production and Craft Specialization", BAR International Series 1358, Oxford Archaeopress, 2005.) Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1394012
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This intact and x-large piece is a Colima standing shaman/priest that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 17.8 inches high. This powerful piece has a dark red glaze that covers the entire piece, and has some spotty dark black and brown mineral deposits, along with some attractive root marking. This figure is seen holding a rattle in his left hand, and a curved implement in his right which may be a ceremonial knife. He is also seen wearing a shell pectoral, short trunks, and a domed helmet/headdress that also has a spout emerging from the top of the head. His upper torso is also completely nude, save for the shell pectoral that is seen in the center of his chest. This powerful looking figure is also seen with a drug induced trance-like expression, and has narrow "coffee bean" type eyes that enhance his look. This figure appears to be conducting a religious drug induced ceremony, and this figure is likely a shaman/priest. This piece also stands very solidly, and is somewhat heavy, as it is a thick walled ceramic. A scarce piece for the culture, as it is also in intact condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 1989, no. 105. ($1,500-$2,000.00 estimates, $2,860.00 realized.) Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1399232
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This superb piece is a Roman bronze cherub that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 2.4 inches high. This exceptional piece is intact, and has a beautiful dark green patina with some minute light green mineral deposits. This attractive piece also has some gold gilt seen on the toga that is seen draped over one shoulder and is tied at the waist. This cute cherub is very animated, and is seen looking up and appears to be holding a plate or some other object that may have held an offering. His open palms likely balanced a plate on one shoulder, and his toga also padded the weight. He is seen looking up with a slightly smiling open mouth, and his fine straight hair falls behind his tilted head. This cherub has a chubby type body and is seen completely nude from behind. This piece is intact, is in near mint "as found" condition, and is a scarce example. This exceptional Roman bronze may also have been part of another vessel of some sort, as there are remnants of a round mounting pin seen under the left leg. This piece has a custom display stand, and is a wonderful little Roman bronze. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including US Customs Entry documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1331717
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This extremely rare weapon is a bronze mace/sword that dates circa 1800-1200 B.C. This piece is approximately 17.5 inches long, by 2 inches wide at it's widest point, which is near the tip end of the weapon. This piece was hand forged from bronze, and is a thick and heavy bronze weapon. This piece also graduates in thickness from the shank end to the tip of the weapon, and at the tip of the weapon, this heavy weapon is approximately .32 inches thick. This piece was made as a combination mace and a "blunt-ended" type sword, which had devastating effect on heavily armed warriors that had helmets and other body armor. This weapon was designed to crush helmets with it's blunt end, and penetrate armor with sheer force. This piece also has an attachment hole near the tip end which was likely used to hold a leather tie that was used either to hang or suspend the weapon for use. This piece likely did not fit into a scabbard, as the shape of this weapon with the curved end would not easily fit into a scabbard as a straight blade can. In addition, this extremely rare weapon either had a handle attached to the shank for use with one hand, or it may have had an extended wooden shaft attached to the shank that was used by the warrior with two hands. An extended handle of this type would generate a tremendous amount of force, and it may be that a weapon of this type was used by a warrior in a war chariot or from horseback. There is also the possibility that if this weapon had an extended handle, it may have been used by infantry against mounted or chariot forces in order to crush their heavy armor. This weapon may also be of a type that was also used in the battle of Kadesh, circa 1274 B.C., which was the largest chariot battle ever fought in antiquity, and involved perhaps 5,000-6,000 war chariots. This battle pitted the Hittite Empire under Muwatalli II against the Egyptian Empire under Ramesses II, and many types of weapons were created by both sides for this conflict. The metal composition of this impressive weapon has sections with striated surfaces, and this type of metal composition does match other Egyptian bronze weaponry from the period, and the form of this weapon is somewhat analogous to the Egyptian sickle sword known as a "khopesh". This type of weapon was also designed to pull with a hook at the end, stab with it's pointed end, and slice with it's curved blade. This "khopesh" is a muti-purpose designed weapon, as the mace/sword weapon offered here, and both of these types of weapons could be used several ways in battle. The mace/sword weapon offered here has a "flat mace edge" on one side that is for a crushing application, and the other side has a "blunt sword edge" for a cutting and slicing application. This piece also has several dark brown and green mineral deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and some spotty red and dark brown highlights within the metal. This piece is also 100% intact, and has no repair/restoration. Overall, this complete piece is an extremely rare weapon that is highly specialized, is one of the most devastating weapons from antiquity, and is a weapon that has seldom been on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1226590
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This powerful piece is a Chimu culture silver mask that dates circa Late Intermediate Period, 1000-1400 A.D. This piece is has a Lambayeque Valley, Peru, type of design, and is approximately 11.75 inches wide by 6 inches high by 1.2 inches in relief. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has silver with added copper metal plate. This piece also has a thin applied coat of original spotty red cinnabar than runs through the flat center section of the piece. This intact piece has a "box-type" nose construction, and is attached to the main body of the piece with folded over tabs. There are decorative small hand beaten rounded dot patterns, that are seen at each end of the ear sections, and these ear sections also show a rounded design which resemble ear spools. These main body of this piece is divided into three sections, and the middle section is the nose and "line-formed" mouth which is the focus of this piece, and the eyes seen in each of the two outer sections, frame the entire compact design of the face. On the back side of this piece, there are some textile remains seen between the main body of the piece and the "box-type" constructed nose section. This piece covered a "mummy-bundle" which was also wrapped in textiles, and this piece was likely wrapped around the face of the mummy along with additional textile wrapping. Depending on the status and wealth of the deceased, these Chimu masks could be of ceramic, of wood, or even cloth, but those of the most powerful were of gold and silver. This piece also has a dark gray patina, with several minute spotty black mineral deposits. Another analogous example of nearly the same size can be seen in Bonham's African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art, Nov.2013, no. 33. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $11,875.00 realised.) This piece is also mounted within a black wooden shadow box, and clear Velcro tabs securely hold it into place which attaches this piece to the black backing. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Prehistorical item #1402347
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This intact and attractive piece is an Apulian-Gnathian pelike that dates to the late 4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.7 inches high. This piece has a thin black glaze with attractive light gray burnishing, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This vessel also has additional and detailed fine body molding seen at the upper rim, and above the ring base on the lower body of the vessel. There are added incised decorative tendril vines that run around the upper shoulder, and these incised elements are also seen on the neck of the vessel. There are also added white painted vine leaves and grape clusters, although faded, that are seen on this vessel as well. This piece has some minute root marking, and some light brown mineral deposits which also add to this vessel's eye appeal. A nice intact piece with fine body molding, and likely made by an accomplished potter. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1357051
Apolonia Ancient Art
$765.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems and large hoops are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately 1.25 inches high, by .25 inches in diameter for the shield emblems. Together the pair weighs 1.5 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems each have a raised central dot, and have a detailed beaded border. The hoops are very simple, and are a single strand that was attached to each of the shield emblems. These pieces are very durable, and can easily be worn today, as there is no clasp. This pair has some minute light red mineralization, and can be easily cleaned if one desires. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry with a simple design, which also displays well with the wearer. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1378546
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This very rare Greek (EL) electrum stater is from Kyzikos, and dates circa 550-450 B.C. This coin is approximately 20mm wide, weighs 16.12 gms, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). This coin has a light reddish/brown patina, and perfect centering. The (OBV.) features a bust of Athena wearing a crested "Attic type" helmet facing left, with a zig-zag and pellet pattern designed crest base, and a tunny fish below. The (Rev.) features a quadripartite incuse square. This coin probably was influenced by the helmeted Athena coinage of Athens, and perhaps signaled a trade alliance. An exceptional specimen not often seen on the market. References: Boston MFA 1446; Gulbenkian 609. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Roma Numismatics, Auction IX, 2015, no. 320. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323161
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an early Greek Athenian silver tetradrachm that dates circa 500-490 B.C., and is classified in "Group L" by Seltman. This coin is approximately 25mm wide, weighs 16.61 gms, and is in mint state condition (FDC/FDC). This coin has a very light gray patina with some minute spotty dark black deposits, and has a beautiful natural "as found" patina. This exceptional coin has the helmeted head of Athena facing right seen on the obverse, and the reverse has a facing standing owl, with an olive sprig behind, and the Greek lettering (A-TH-E) before. The standing owl was also the "civic badge" of Athens, and was widely recognized in the ancient Greek world. This coin also has perfect centering, in addition to, extremely high relief which are factors that make this coin one of the top examples that have been seen on the market. This coin was also likely minted shortly before the battle of Marathon, circa 490 B.C., and was likely used to help expand the Athenian forces that opposed the invading Persian military juggernaut. The helmeted Athena is also a masterpiece of Greek Archaic art, with the slightly smiling face of Athena and the large almond-shaped eyes which are hallmarks of the Archaic Period. The bust of Athena also has a sculptural quality and design that is not often seen on prior or subsequent Athenian issues. This piece also displays a full crest and neckline that is not often seen as well, as this piece has perfect centering and was minted on a large and full flan. Overall, this coin is one of the finest specimens known for the type due to the reasons noted above, along with the fact that this piece has exceptional artistic style which also contributes to this coin's beauty and eye appeal. References: Svoronos, Pl. 6, No. 11. and Seltman, Pl. XV, A214/P275. Ex: Private German collection circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Byzantine : Pre AD 1000 item #1398323
Apolonia Ancient Art
$365.00
This intact and vibrant piece is a late Byzantine glass weight/game piece that dates circa 7th-9th century A.D. This intact piece is approximately .8 inches in diameter, and has a vibrant dark blue color with applied white trailing highlights. This piece may have been used as weight in a scale that weighed Byzantine coins, and/or it may also have served as a game piece. This piece was made with a hot trailing glass that was spun around the dark blue solid core, and was made as earlier Greek core-formed glass. This piece also has a slightly flat bottom, and easily stands upright. This piece does not have a hole through the center, as beads also produced during this period have, and this piece is a beautiful solid example that can easily be fitted into a modern piece of jewelry. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This attractive piece is a Paracas bowl that dates to the Chavinoid Period Paracas, circa 1000-600 B.C., and is approximately 6.8 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high. This piece is among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean pre-Columbian culture, and it has very detailed incised geometric "line-designed" motifs. This light to dark brown glazed piece has added dark red highlights, and this dark red color is seen within an incised band that runs around the piece. This band has two incised geometric feline masks seen nearly on opposite sides of the bowl, and between, there are defined boxes that have an incised "hand-design" symbol within each box. The geometric feline masks are seen in a two-dimensional manner, with raised noses from the surface of the bowl, and incised fangs extending above and below a horizontal mouth. The overall design illustrates a very powerful sacred image that also appears to protect the contents of the bowl. Bowls of this type may also have been produced for ritual purposes and/or offerings. This piece is intact, save for a small pie-shaped shard that was repaired back into the main body of the piece. This piece also has some attractive root marking, and the glaze has a very fine even high gloss finish. There is also some dark brown burnishing seen on the bottom surface of the bowl that also adds to the eye appeal of this piece. (Another analogous piece was offered in Sotheby's "Pre-Columbian Art", New York, June 1999, no. 212. $1,200-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356584
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Celtic bronze ring, otherwise known as a "terret ring", and dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide, and is a complete example. This piece was reportedly found in the southern coastal region of the United Kingdom, and was mounted on a war chariot that served as a guide for the horse reins. The reins would pass through the ring and gave the charioteer greater control over the horses. The design of this piece, with a raised center and oval shape, also allowed for better separation of the two sets of reins that connected to the two horses that pulled a Celtic war chariot. This piece also has an attachment loop at the base which was mounted down into a wooden rail, and was held in place by a pin. This esoteric piece was also made when Caius Julius Caesar invaded Britain, circa 55 B.C., and the war chariot was relatively new to the Romans as a weapon of war. The war chariot, with one charioteer and one warrior with a shield and spear, gave the Romans all they could handle at the time of the invasion. The Romans faced two-wheeled and four-wheeled chariots which carried warriors into the attack. The war chariot was introduced to Britain in the 3rd century B.C. by the Parisi of Yorkshire, the Gallic tribe whose capital still bears their name (Paris). The Celtic chariots were made of light wooded frames and were elaborately fitted with bronze fittings and wheels with iron rims. The war chariot is featured in many of the sagas of Celtic mythology, and the piece offered here is an excellent representation of the native Celts of Britain. This complete piece has a graceful shape, has no repair/restoration, and has a beautiful dark green patina. There is also some spotty mineral deposits seen mostly on the underside of the piece. Another analogous piece of the same size and type was offered in Bonham's Antiquities, London, Dec. 1995, no. 339. (2500-3500 pounds estimates. See attached photo.) For the type see: E.T. Leeds "Celtic Ornament in the British Isles", Oxford, 1933, pp. 118-126. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1386086
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,875.00
This intact Chavin piece is a canteen designed vessel with a seated deity that dates to the Middle Chavin Period, circa 1000-700 B.C. This interesting piece is approximately 8.75 inches high, by 4.5 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This piece is a seated deity with a rounded body, extended nose, and appears to be wearing a skull cap and a loose mantle. There are also two suspension holes seen on each side of the raised spout, and this piece may have been carried as a canteen that likely held a sacred liquid. The arms and hands are also tucked in at the front, and has an analogous design as the sculptural deities that were excavated by Julio Tello at Moxeke, Peru. (See attached photo that is seen in "Chavin and the Origins of Andean Civilization" by Richard Burger, Thames and Hudson Pub., 1992, p. 83, fig. 66.) There is also a strong probability that this piece is a "ceremonial type" vessel and was used for offerings and ceremony. This piece has a thick dark gray glaze over the entire vessel, some attractive dark brown burnishing, and is intact with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is not only a scarce to rare Chavin vessel that is seldom seen on the market, but more importantly, it is also an important ceremonial type that depicts a sacred deity. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export, and US Customs Import documentation. In addition, there is a TL authentication lab test from Gutachten Lab, Germany, dated 06/11/1979, no. 3679116. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1325568
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This powerful ancient coin was minted in ancient Lydia, and is attributed to the king of Lydia, Kroisos, circa 561-546 B.C. This silver coin is known as a Siglos, which is a half-stater, and weighs 5.3 gms. This coin was also minted on the so-called "heavy standard", and this coin type is also found in electrum and gold. This coin is in about Extremely Fine condition (EF-/EF-), has good centering, is approximately 17mm wide, and has a nice light gray patina. This coin features a powerful imagae on the obverse, which is the forepart of a lion bearing his teeth with an open mouth, and is facing the forepart of a horned bull. The reverse features a two part incuse square punch. King Kroisos was also the first to abandon electrum coinage in favor of a bimetallic currency based on pure gold and silver. The coin offered here represents this shift in the minting of ancient Greek coinage, and likely was minted 50-75 years after the invention of coinage. A nice example for the type. References: SNG Tubingen 3656; SNG van Aulock 2876. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1328301
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This piece is a superb example of an Italic bronze "Kouros" figurine, and is an early Etruscan example that dates to the Archaic Period, circa 6th century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.8 inches high, by .72 inches wide. This complete and intact bronze is in the form of a nude standing male "Kouros", which is a Greek convention of art design that was derived from earlier Egyptian statuary, and was geometric in design, rather than realistic in form. This standing piece is also very analogous to the standing figural Greek "Kouros" and "Korai" type of statuary which was produced in the 7th-6th century B.C. This piece was cast as one solid figure, and was then hand stamped with round circles for the eyes, nipples, and navel. This piece also has earlier "Geometric Period" artistic style with squared angled shoulders and jaw, arms straight down at the sides, and a serene face which looks alive with the large round eyes. There are also incised lines on the hands and feet which define fingers and toes. In addition, this piece has a beautiful dark green patina with some spotty dark red highlights. This piece has an analogous artistic style as the piece seen in "The Etruscans", Mario Torelli ed., Rizzoli Pub. 2000, page 591. This piece can also stand by itself, as it has extended feet which forms a solid base. This piece has a custom Plexiglas display stand as well. This scarce and superb piece has better detail that what is usually seen on pieces of this type, as it has very little wear because it was a "votive" type piece. Ex: Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 1994, no. 174. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates.) Ex: New York private collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1382837
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Teotihaucan tripod vase that dates to the Early to Middle Classic Period, circa 300-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.4 inches high, by 5.7 inches in diameter, and is intact with no restoration and/or repair. This esoteric piece has a slightly flared rim, and has three hollow slab legs that were attached on the flat bottom of the main body of the vessel. These slab legs have a sacred woven mat pattern seen within, and the dark gray main body has a thin outer stucco covering that has yellow, orange, and green colors over a thin coating of white plaster. The painted iconography features two green-limbed plants seen over a yellow ground line, which are also seen on opposite sides of the vessel, and these may represent the flowering nopal (prickly pear) cactus which has medicinal properties. The stucco is also about 90% intact, and has additional pictured objects, although much of the outer layer has been eroded away. The stucco is also much more complete than what is usually seen, and has not been restored and/or over painted. This complete vessel has rare iconography, and is a superb example for the type. Another vessel of this type and size is seen in the St. Louis Art Museum, and is seen in "Pre-Columbian Art: The Morton D. May and The St. Louis Art Museum Collections", By Lee Parsons, New York, 1980. no. 134. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamberg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic, as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1181942
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,275.00
This interesting and lively Moche ceramic dates circa 300-500 A.D., Moche III-IV periods. This mint quality piece is approximately 9.25 inches high, and is in intact condition with vibrant dark red and cream colors. This piece also has some attractive light brown burnishing, and minute root marking seen on the upper end of the spout and near the lower base of the vessel. This piece has a lively running deer, seen on each side of the vessel, and each deer faces a central dividing "double-bar" symbol which is seen at the front of the piece. This "double-bar" symbol may also represent a sacrificial "tumi", but more likely it simply is a "tie symbol", with a rope and/or cloth tied around the neck of the vessel. According to Elizabeth Benson in "Death-Associated Figures on Mochica Pottery", published in "Death and the Afterlife in Pre-Columbian Art", Washington D.C., 1973, p. 108: "The tie seems to be symbolic of offering or scarifice; I believe that tying is an integral part of the funerary ritual, and that the jar with the rope around the neck is the purest funerary symbol. The tied jar is perhaps in some way equivalent to the prisoner figure or the sacrificial limb or head". The dark red lively running deer are seen against a cream background, and are vibrantly portrayed with an upturned tail, a "floral-leaf" designed ear, an antler reaching forward at the top of the head, and a protruding hanging tongue. This piece also has a conical projection from the the top of the vessel, along with a seated frog that is seen centered at the top within a red fineline petal design, and the conical projection has an attached red stirrup handle seen on the side. This conical projection may represent a Moche ceremonial sacrificial club, as it is very analogous in shape to the terminal end of a wooden ceremonial sacrificial club that was found in Tomb I, Platform II, Huaca de la Luna, Peru. (See "Moche Art and Archaeology in Ancient Peru", National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Yale University Press, 2001, pp. 96-97, fig. 10. See attached photo.) The ceremonial sacrificial club also is associated with the "tie symbol" and the lively running deer seen on this vessel, as they may represent deer that are portrayed as being part of a Moche ceremonial deer hunt. According to Christopher Donnan in "Deer Hunting and Combat", seen in "The Spirit of Ancient Peru", Thames and Hudson, 1997, p. 54-55: "Deer are known to run with their tongues hanging out the sides of their mouths. No other animal in Moche art is shown in this way. Deer are known to run with their tongues out when they are winded or tired, and the artists may have intended to show them in this state. Moreover, when a deer is killed, the tongue will often drop out the side of the mouth through a gap that exists between the deer's incisor and molor teeth. In Moche deer hunting scenes, hunters consistently wear elaborate clothing, headdresses, and ornaments-attire that is altogether unsuited to the stalking and killing of deer. To understand why they are dressed this way, it is useful to consider the ethnohistoric records describing the great hunts practiced by the Inca. The best account is of a hunt held by the Inca ruler, Manco Inca, near the valley of Jauja in honor of Francisco Pizarro around 1536. On that occasion, 10,000 Indians formed a ring around an area 30 to 60 miles in circumference. They then closed toward the center, driving all the animals in the area before them, and forming several concentric rings as their circle grew smaller. When the circle was small enough, designated hunters entered it and killed as many animals as was desired." It's also quite possible that the deer seen on this vessel are portrayed at the point when they were ceremoniously killed, and that they were killed primarily for their blood for it's use in ceremony. In addition, the "floral-leaf" designed ear may also represent a deer's ear that has been engorged with blood from stressed running. The Moche placed a great deal of importance to the deer hunt, and the piece offered here shows artistic features that point to this fact. This mint quality piece is a scarce example of Moche fineline ceramics, and is seldom seen on the market. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Dr. Klaus Maria collection, circa 1980-2012. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a TL test document from Gutachten Lab, no. 279006, dated July 6th, 1990, and EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1004703
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This scarce extremely large piece is a Greek blackware guttos that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 4th century B.C. This attractive vessel is approximately 6.75 inches high, by 6 inches wide from the top of the spout to the opposite side. This piece is intact, and is in mint condition with no repair/restoration. The surface of this exceptional piece also has a nice multi-colored iridescent patina, along with a rich glossy black glaze, and in addition, there is some spotty and minute white calcite deposits. This piece is an extremely large example for the type, and there is no glaze loss and cracking which is usually seen as well. This vessel has an extended trumpeted spout, a looped handle, detailed attractive ribbed sides, and a roundel of a grimacing facing Silenus head with wild billowing hair. Silenus was a woodland deity in ancient Greek mythology, and this piece shows his image very well as the unruly companion of Dionysus. This roundel that features a vibrant facing Silenus head that was mold made, and has very high relief, as it is approximately .75 inches high. This type of vessel likely held precious oil, and was used in ceremony as well as for everyday use. There is only one opening into the vessel through the spout, and the looped handle gave one exact control over the liquid. The extended round footed base of this piece gave this vessel an added capacity for liquids, and Greek guttos vessels of this type usually do not have this added design feature. This large piece may have also been produced in Athens for export, and this type of vessel was also made in the Greek colonies of southern Italy. An intact and scarce x-large vessel that is seldom seen the market, and is one of the best recorded examples for he type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Art, New York, circa 1990's-2000's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1234381
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is an extremely large Mayan green jadeite tube that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This solid piece is approximately 8.5 inches long by 1.4 inches in diameter, and has a beautiful dark to light green color. The beautiful stone seen here is likely jadeite, rather than serpentine, as it is extremely dense. This interesting piece has a bow-drilled hole at each end which connect near the center, and the bow-drilled holes are approximately .5 to .6 inches in diameter which also slightly narrow within the tube. There is also a layer of gray calcite deposits seen on the inner surfaces, and a light mineralized patina on the outer surfaces as well. This piece is also not perfectly round, has a somewhat rectangular shape, and has a great deal of eye appeal. There is a very strong possibility that this scarce piece was used in Mayan smoking ceremonies, and/or may have been used in Mayan regalia and served as a decorative item in a headdress, a necklace, or a sacred ceremonial object. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is likely a dense green jadeite which was sacred to the Maya. According to Francis Robicsek, in "The Smoking Gods", University of Oklahoma Press, 1978, p. 73, Robicsek elaborates on the forehead tube that was used to identify God K: "Forehead tube thought to represent a cigar. This is a fairly constant trademark of this deity. The identification of God K of any portrait lacking the forehead tube is suspect. It is nearly always present on ceramic representations and on stone carvings, but is usually absent from paintings in the codices. The object may be tubular or funnel-shaped, or it may resemble a celt. Sometimes it is undecorated, but more often it is striated, dotted, or marked with oval symbols. It also varies greatly in size and, if painted, in color. As a rule the tube emerges from the forehead; however, in two paintings, both of them on Peten ceramics, it protrudes from the mouth. On most portrayals the handle of the tube is sunk into the head and it is not visible; on others it emerges at the nape. As discussed earlier, these tubes probably represent cigars, but the possibility that they may represent torches or celts cannot be excluded." In addition, the piece offered here may also have been used by the Maya relative to the relationship of the royal elite to God K, and may have been used by the Maya as noted above in some capacity as a decorative element and/or used relative to the smoking culture of the ancient Maya. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private Arizona collection. Ex: Private CO. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: