Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1356971
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This pair of Roman gold earrings with shield emblems are complete, and date circa 2nd-3rd century A.D. These attractive pieces are approximately .5 inches in diameter for the hoops, and the shield emblems are approximately .3 inches in diameter. Together the pair weighs 2.4 grams, and they are solid gold and are not plated. The shield emblems have a small raised dotted bar in the center, framed by a detailed dotted border, and this design completes the look of the shield emblems. The shield emblems also have a single rivet that attaches them to the thick gold hoops, and this adds additional strength and durability to these beautiful examples. These pieces can easily be worn today with some adjustments, as they do not open with a clasp, and were tied off so the wearer could wear these every day. A nice collectable pair of ancient jewelry, and comes with a custom metal display stand. For the type see: Ruseva-Prokoska L., "Roman Jewelry, A Collection of National Archaeological Museum", Sofia, Bulgaria, 1991, nos. 30-35. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #579338
Apolonia Ancient Art
$4,625.00
This x-large Roman glass jug dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 7.5 inches high by 5.8 inches in diameter. This beautiful piece is also in mint condition, with no stress cracks and/or chips. This pleasing light green vessel has beautiful multi-colored iridescence and nice minute root marking. There are also five decorative wheel-cut (lathe) bands that run around the main body of the piece, and these bands may also have served as a measurement indicator of the level of the contained liquid. This was likely the case, as the five cut bands are evenly spaced on the vessel. There is also a thick strap handle that was applied to the upper shoulder and below the lip. The lip of this attractive vessel was also turned out and down, which formed a rounded edge. (For an analogous example, see Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2001, no.213. This vessel is approximately 9.25 inches high, and has eleven decorative wheel-cut bands, three of which are deeply cut. $20,000.00-$30,000.00 estimates, and realized $23,500.00. Another recent comparable sold at Cristie's Antiquities, London, April 2010, no. 98, for 5625 Pounds, approximately $7600.00, and had 5,700-7,900 pounds estimates. This vessel is approximately 6.5 inches high and is a light green color with six decorative wheel-cut bands. See attached photo.) The piece offered here is an exceptional large example of early Roman blown glass, is very analogous to the two examples noted above, and is scarce in this mint quality condition. Ex: Private English collection. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Prehistorical item #1402347
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This intact and attractive piece is an Apulian-Gnathian pelike that dates to the late 4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.7 inches high. This piece has a thin black glaze with attractive light gray burnishing, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This vessel also has additional and detailed fine body molding seen at the upper rim, and above the ring base on the lower body of the vessel. There are added incised decorative tendril vines that run around the upper shoulder, and these incised elements are also seen on the neck of the vessel. There are also added white painted vine leaves and grape clusters, although faded, that are seen on this vessel as well. This piece has some minute root marking, and some light brown mineral deposits which also add to this vessel's eye appeal. A nice intact piece with fine body molding, and likely made by an accomplished potter. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1367222
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This exceptional piece is an X-large Greek Attic lekythos that dates circa 5th century B.C. This beautiful extremely large piece is approximately 16.75 inches high, by 4.8 inches in diameter at the upper shoulder. This piece is also intact with no repair and/or restoration, and this is also rare for a large-scale vessel such as this, as they are normally broken at the neck. The elongated neck seen on this beautiful piece gracefully extends upward, and this section of the vessel has an attached handle with an open flat-lipped spout. There is also a very small hole in the body, seen centered below where the handle attaches to the main body of the vessel, and this was added in order to speed and control the flow of liquid from the vessel, due to it's large size and the small opening through the elongated neck. It's quite possible that this small hole was added during a funeral ceremony in antiquity, as vessels of this type were used to pour votive libations. This piece also has a great deal of original white-ground material that was applied to the main body of the vessel, and in addition, there are spotty black mineral deposits mixed with this material, and these deposits are also seen on various sections of the vessel. The main body of this attractive piece also gradually tapers down in diameter, from the upper shoulder to the bottom round ring base, and this gives this piece a very elegant shape. This piece also has a flat bottom and this vessel stands very solid as well. Greek Attic white-ground lekythos of this type were used primarily for funeral rites, and often had fine-line figural design over the white-ground surface. These vessels were often placed in the tomb as a votive offering, and were often brought to the tomb as votive offerings by the family of the deceased. The fact that the small hole was added to the vessel is also a good indication that this piece was actually used in a funeral rite, and was then left as a votive offering. The vessel offered here is much larger than what is normally seen, and is rare not only for it's size, but also for it's intact condition. This Greek Attic ceramic also has a high degree of eye appeal, and is extremely graceful on display. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1341167
Apolonia Ancient Art
$8,675.00
This superb Olmec seated figurine dates to the Intermediate Olmec Period, circa 900-600 B.C., and is approximately 3.6 inches high, by 1.9 inches wide, by 1.75 inches deep. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and was carved from a light to dark green serpentine stone. This piece also has some spotty light black to dark green dotted inclusions seen within the stone, and a light brown patina seen in the deep recesses of the figurine. There is also some spotty minute root marking, and some faint traces of red cinnabar. This piece likely depicts a shaman seen in the seated position, and it is a complete carved figure that is finished in the round. This attractive piece also sits upright without falling over, as this piece also has a flat to slightly outward curved underside that provides a solid base. The arms and hands are seen resting on the knees of the crossed legs, and the oval shaped head is seen slightly tilted to the left. The entire body appears to be nude, as are most Olmec figurines of this type, and the facial expression also features the typical downward turned thick lips and horizontal deep carved eyes. The mouth design with the thick lips that are downturned, is also known as the "Olmec jaguar mouth", and is the prominent design feature of the piece offered here. The "jaguar mouth" seen on this piece is also thrust forward towards the viewer, and was an intentional design of the artist, and one can easily see this design feature as one looks at this figurine from the side in profile. The slight tilt of the head also accentuates the design of the face, and gives this piece a great deal of expression. The wide nose has two small bow drilled holes for the nostrils, and in addition, there are two bow drilled holes seen at each end of each eye. The overall face design is one that is seen as a "transformation" type face, from human to jaguar, or vice-versa. The seated and/or kneeling pose of this figurine is also known as the "transformation shaman pose", which is associated with Olmec figurines that are thought to depict a shaman in various stages of transformation from human to jaguar, and vice-versa. (See "The Olmec World: Ritual and Rulership", by F. Kent Reilly III, Princeton University, Abrams Pub., 1995, pp. 27-45.) The superb Olmec figurine offered here is an excellent example of Olmec "transformational" type art, and is seldom offered on the market in this condition. This piece also has an extensive authentication examination report from Stoetzer, Inc., Miami, FL., report #010514.1, dated 02/09/2014; and was also authenticated by Robert Sonin, New York, c/o Arte Primitivo, New York. Ex: Edmund Budde Collection, circa 1950's. Ex: Arte Primitivo, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including the authentication examination report noted above.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre AD 1000 item #1343481
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This superb piece is a Japanese samurai katana sword that dates to the Edo Period, circa 1603-1868 A.D. This piece is approximately 36 inches long, from the tip to the end handle cap. The blade is approximately 28-28.5 inches long, as the tang is centered within the handle wrapping, and this is an approximate size due to the tang being wrapped. This piece was also handle rewrapped by the Royal Ontario Museum under the supervision of David Pepper, who was the curator of the Japanese Arms and Armor Department. He also authenticated this piece to the Edo Period, circa 1603-1868, as the tang also has the stamped signature of a swordsmith signed Yoshinao, who lived in Seki City in old Mino, Japan. This swordsmith also had many ancestors with his same name that worked in the same city as well, and are well known for producing many swords during during WWII. It's also extremely likely that the piece offered here was subsequently remounted, in addition to the handle being rewrapped in WWII for use in a Military mount, as all Japanese officers were required to wear a sword. The handle wrappings now seen on the impressive piece offered here likely replaced the old military mounts and wrapping. The handle fittings and bronze round hilt guard (tsuba) now seen on this piece also date to the Edo Period, and may have been original to the piece along with the other handle fittings, and were all incorporated into the original and previous military handle wrappings. This may have been done for traditional reasons, as swords of this type were and are regarding as having a "living energy". This piece was originally made for a samurai warrior in feudal Japan, and was designed for battle using two hands. This remarkable piece also has an extremely fine razor sharp blade, which defines this piece as being among the finest cutting weapons in world military history. One truly has to handle this weapon with care, as this blade is still razor sharp and a slight slip would likely result in injury. The Edo Period fittings also feature a scarce gold gilt protector deity face that is seen peeking out of the handle wrappings on Side A, and in addition, there are gold inlayed symbols and/or lettering seen within the Edo Period round bronze hilt guard (tsuba). The bronze end cap has very elaborated designs as well. This piece was also produced by hammering layers of steel with different carbon concentrations, and this process was very labor extensive and involved several people working together in unison. The extensive hammering removed impurities within the metal, and this resulted in a stronger blade. The constant hammering and cooling of the blade with water also resulted in a wavy line seen on the side of the blade that is called the "hamon", which is made more distinct by polishing. Each "hamon" and each smith's style of "hamon" is very distinct, and is in fact analogous to a fingerprint. The blade on the piece offered here was polished into a mirror like finish, and is in superb condition. The blade surface has some minor and light brown age spots that are not very noticeable which show the age of the blade, and one can easily polish the blade to remove these if one wishes to do so. David Pepper also left this patina to show the age of the blade, and his rewrapping of the handle follows traditional Japanese form and construction. This piece also sits on a custom wooded stand, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a traditional Japanese work of art, and is one of the most distinctive weapons known in the world today. Ex: David Pepper collection, circa 1960's. Exhibited: Royal Ontario Museum, Canada, circa 1980's. Ex: Paul Haig collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1295397
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This beautiful Greek coin is a silver drachm attributed to the mint and city of Larissa, and dates circa 400-380 B.C. This piece is approximately 20mm in diameter, weighs 6.15 g., and is in EF-/EF condition. This piece also has extremely high relief and the obverse features the beautiful facing head of the nymph Larissa; and the reverse shows a grazing horse standing right on a ground line, with Greek lettering below meaning "Larissa". There is also the minute lettering "AI" seen below the belly of the horse, and this represents the signature of the die artist. According to C. Lorber in "The Silver Facing Head Coins of Larissa", Early Classification, Type 3: "The artist 'AI' became the mint's chief engraver, displacing he who signed himself 'SIMO', and the present dies are among the finest in the entire series." The coin offered here is one of the earliest dies of the series, and the early dies of the series had the two artist signatures noted above. In addition, the flank of the standing horse has a brand that appears to be the Greek letter "X". This "X" brand is also one of the few known examples, and appears only on this particular reverse die. It is unknown as to the meaning of this brand, and as this coin was signed by the artist, there certainly has to be a meaning behind this symbol. The early series with the facing heads of the mint Larissa predating circa 380 B.C., are the most desirable among collectors, and have a high degree of art. The attractive facing head seen here is leaning to the left, as the right shoulder is raised, and the female image has flowing hair that appears to be moving with the wind. The artist was able to convey a great deal of movement on the obverse, and in contrast, a complete sense of calm is conveyed on the reverse with the standing and grazing horse. This coin type, along with the artist's signature, is also considered by many numismatists to be a masterpiece, not only within the series, but also for the period. An exceptional coin of great beauty which is now scarce on the market. C. Lorber, Early Classification, no. 20.2. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1990's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1170376
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This superb little piece is a Greek Attic stemless kylix ceramic that dates circa 480-470 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.25 inches wide from handle to handle, and is approximately 2.1 inches high. This piece is also intact, is in mint quality condition, and has a multi-colored patina over an even deep black glaze. This multi-colored patina also compares with the finest examples that are normally seen for an Attic black glazed vessel of this type. This nice Greek Attic ceramic also has a nice brilliant deep black glaze on the inside of the bowl. There is an inconspicuous area, centered just below where one of the handles is attached to the main body of the vessel, and this is where an incised double "lambda" Greek letter symbol is seen. The ancient Greek "lambda" letter subsequently developed into letters in other alphabets including the Latin "L". These small letters and/or symbols are approximately .18 and.2 inches high, and may have been added to this piece to denote the owner, and/or perhaps how this piece was used in trade. In addition, these marks could have been used as a price notation and/or as a mark to denote a master vase of a group production. According to John Boardman in "The History of Greek Vases", Thames and Hudson Pub., London 2001, p. 154: "It seems to have been in the potter's yard that marks were made on the pots to identify their eventual carrier." In addition, Boardman states: "Most of these merchant marks are seen on vases of around 570 to 450 B.C., the period of busiest Athenian export..". A.W. Johnson in "Trademarks on Greek Vases", Aris & Philips Ltd., Wiltshire, U.K., 1979, pp. 5-6, states that: "A number of the marks are relatively inconspicuous, including those on the handle and some on the shoulder in the vicinity of the handle.....and there can be little doubt that these are trademarks." Types 2F and 6F, seen in the above reference, is also a close match seen on the vessel offered here. According to Johnson on pp. 4-7, Johnson states that the overall number of incised marks seen on these vessels is paltry, compared to those vessels with marks that are seen under foot. He also adds that these incised marks may also represent "batch" production marks, and that one vessel was marked to indicate the entire group of vessels that were possibly produced for export. It is also interesting to note that one of the "lambda" letters/symbols is slightly smaller than the other letter/symbol, and may represent a tally mark for a "batch" of vessels. This interesting piece also has an offset lip, as seen with the line that runs around the bowl, and is classified as being part of the Attic "Inset Lip Class, circa 480-470 B.C.". For the discussion of the type as a whole see: "The Athenian Agora, Vol. 12", by B. Sparkes and L. Talcott, Princeton University, 1970. This exceptional piece has some minute white calcite deposits, seen mostly on the bottom of the vessel, and a light red band seen above and below the bottom base ring. This interesting piece is scarce to rare, especially in this intact condition, and is a superb example with rare trade symbols that are not often seen on vessels of this type. Ex: Private Swiss collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1364645
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,375.00
This nice piece is a Greek bronze oinochoe that dates to the mid 5th century B.C. This large piece is approximately 9.2 inches high, by 6.5 inches in diameter. This piece is in superb condition and is intact, save for a minor crack repair at the base of the vessel which is normal for a large vessel of this type. This attractive vessel has a trefoil spout, and a graceful upper shoulder that extends up from the rounded flat base. There is a heavy looped handle attached to this vessel, and was cast as one piece. This interesting handle was also designed so that the vessel could be suspended from a cord from the raised loop. The lower end of this heavy vertical handle terminates with a thick "ivy-leaf" that is attached to the side of the vessel. There are also two small openings, on each side of the handle near the upper rim, where the cord was attached, and these small openings could also have supported a hinged lid. This piece was also hand beaten from one solid sheet of bronze over a series of molds. This piece also has a beautiful dark to light green patina, with dark blue highlights, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece also easily stands upright, as it has a flat bottom, and the heavy handle was also designed into the upper center of the vessel. (A bronze hydria, dated to circa 450 B.C., with thick "ivy-leaf" terminating handles is seen in the Goulandris Collection in "Ancient Greek Art", Athens, 1996, no. 258. See attached photo.) This scarce vessel is an exceptional example for the type, and is also much rarer than ceramics of this type. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1382837
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This interesting piece is a Teotihaucan tripod vase that dates to the Early to Middle Classic Period, circa 300-600 A.D. This piece is approximately 5.4 inches high, by 5.7 inches in diameter, and is intact with no restoration and/or repair. This esoteric piece has a slightly flared rim, and has three hollow slab legs that were attached on the flat bottom of the main body of the vessel. These slab legs have a sacred woven mat pattern seen within, and the dark gray main body has a thin outer stucco covering that has yellow, orange, and green colors over a thin coating of white plaster. The painted iconography features two green-limbed plants seen over a yellow ground line, which are also seen on opposite sides of the vessel, and these may represent the flowering nopal (prickly pear) cactus which has medicinal properties. The stucco is also about 90% intact, and has additional pictured objects, although much of the outer layer has been eroded away. The stucco is also much more complete than what is usually seen, and has not been restored and/or over painted. This complete vessel has rare iconography, and is a superb example for the type. Another vessel of this type and size is seen in the St. Louis Art Museum, and is seen in "Pre-Columbian Art: The Morton D. May and The St. Louis Art Museum Collections", By Lee Parsons, New York, 1980. no. 134. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamberg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic, as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1380004
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian bronze torso of Osiris that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 2.9 inches high, by 1.3 wide from shoulder to shoulder, and is the upper torso of a standing or seated Osiris. This Osiris is seen wearing an Atef-crown with a detailed and protective raised cobra seen above the forehead, along with an extended false beard. This figurine is also depicted with a mummified form, with the arms folded tightly over his chest, and is seen grasping the regal crook and flail insignia. The face is also very esoteric, and has very fine artistic style with realistic features. The hollow eyes may also have held an inlay as well. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with red highlights, and is a near complete upper torso, save for a small section of both of the upper part of the feathered crown attachments. This piece has exceptional detail with esoteric features, and is a better example than what is normally seen in the market. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1388919
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This piece is a Moche seated prisoner that dates circa 200-500 A.D., and is approximately 12 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This piece also has a tan and brownish orange glaze. This piece is a seated prisoner that has a coiled rope around his neck, and has his hands bound at the back with rope ties. This prisoner is completely nude, save for his wearing a turban with a raised crescent ornament, and behind the raised crescent ornament, there is an open spout. The crescent ornament may also be a symbol of rank, and this prisoner may represent an important captive. The Moche also engaged in ritual combat in order to capture prisoners for sacrifice to their gods, and the seated prisoner seen here is portrayed while awaiting his fate. This may also explain the apparent forlorn expression that is seen on his face. This piece has nice eye appeal, and is an interesting example with the raised crescent turban. For the type see: Christopher Donnan, "Moche Art of Peru", University of California, Los Angeles, 1978. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1993, no. 191. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1230562
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This piece is an extremely rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This piece dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable and solid condition, as this complete piece has an hardened earthen over glaze and is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that are in the superb condition seen here, as the hardened earthen glaze has preserved these pieces. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 12.5 and 8 inches long, and both have a shank end diameter of approximately .75 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a square designed tip which transitions into a rounded shank. The shanks of both the spearpoint and the butt-spike have fine hammered workmanship. This weapon probably had a wooden shaft that was approximately 10-12 feet long, and was better suited for a cavalryman, rather than an infantryman, who often carried a heavier lance known as a "sarissa". The shaft was also likley tapered, and was thinner at the back end of the shaft which would save weight for the weapon. In this case, the cavalryman could ground the weapon with the butt-spike, and also could turn the weapon around in case the spearpoint broke in battle. The piece offered here has a slight curve in the blade, and this likely occurred in battle as well. The butt-spike also allowed the cavalryman to hold the shaft near the weapon's center of gravity, as both the spearpoint and the butt-spike weigh nearly the same. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon offered here is one such weapon, as the finest weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. (For the Hellenistic Greek weapon types see "Greece and Rome at War", by Peter Connolly, United Kingdom, 1998.) This piece is extremely rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1384943
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This rare Egyptian faience amulet is a facing panther head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, by 1.2 inches wide from ear to ear, by .4 inches thick, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This intact piece is also a complete example, and is in superb condition, save for some minute stress cracks on the front face, and a small area of glass loss on the lower left back side. This piece has a light green glaze, a flat back, and has a molded and detailed panther head on the front side. A hole runs through the center from top to bottom, and there are two additional mounting holes seen on each side of the center hole at the top of the piece. (The piece offered here is very analogous in artistic style to the carved facing panther head seen on the basalt statue of Anen, who served as an astronomer priest under Amenhotep III, and is now seen in the Turin Egyptian Museum, Italy. See attached photos.) The panther head is a regal symbol, and attached with the panther skin robe with stars, together represented the attributes of an astronomer. Egyptian regal princes were trained in astronomy so that they could predict the rising and falling of the Nile. The piece offered here likely was part of a regal necklace, is one of the rarest Egyptian amulet types, and is not often seen on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom display stand that is included. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1372973
Apolonia Ancient Art
$865.00
This dainty and superb piece is a Greek Attic lekythos that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This "Black-Figure" Greek Attic piece is approximately 5.6 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter. This attractive little piece has three palmette pattern designs seen at the front side, and the back side has a single strap handle attached to the extended neck and the upper shoulder of the vessel. A black band is seen on the outer edge of the upper lip, and also above the "disk-shaped" base. There is a linear "ray-pattern" seen on the upper shoulder, and all of the design elements seen on this attractive vessel lend this piece a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and is in near mint condition, save for some minor and minute scuff marks seen on the back side of the vessel. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the bottom of the base disk. A nice "Black-Figure" Greek Attic piece that is better than most examples. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Coins : Pre AD 1000 item #1397702
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This Superb to FDC graded & scarce Roman silver denarius was minted in Rome by Hadrian, and dates circa 134-138 A.D. This coin has a large flan, is perfectly centered, weighs 3.49 gms, and is in Superb to FDC condition (EF+/EF+) with a great deal of mint lustre on the surfaces. The obverse (Obv.) shows a laureate Hadrian facing right with a bare neck; and HADRIANVS behind, with AVG.COS.III.P.P front. The reverse (Rev.) shows the goddess Egypt reclining left, holding a sistrum, and an ibis is seen at her feet; AEGYPTOS seen left and above, with a dotted border around. This coin also has high relief, and exceptional detail with the hair of Hadrian and the drapery seen on the goddess Egypt. This coin was also minted to commemorate the travels of Hadrian in Egypt and down the Nile. This coin varient with the bare neck is scarce, as most examples show Hadrian with a draped neck. A choice and scarce example for the type. References: RIC 297; C. 106; BMC 799. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1398232
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This complete and interesting piece is an Egyptian-Phoenician carved hard stone beetle scarab that dates to the 25th-27th Dynasties, circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches long, by .8 inches wide, by .5 inches high, and is a complete and solid example. This piece was carved from a hard stone, and has a light brown/yellow patina with some spotty dark brown mineral deposits. This piece is an extremely fine example for the type, and has clear carved lines relative to the body of the beetle seen on the top side, and the images seen on the flat back side. The flat back side has a carved winged dotted disk seen above, a horned animal at each side, a rabbit below, and a horned ram's head at the center. These animals may also represent reproduction and the continuance of life, and for the ancient Egyptians, the scarab beetle represented rebirth and regeneration. This type of piece was also copied by the Phoenicians who used this type of piece in jewelry. This piece has a bow-drilled hole that runs through the center, and this piece may have been part of a necklace, and may also have served as a votive burial object. Objects of this type for this period were usually made from faience, and were not carved from a hard stone as this fine example. This piece also has a custom display stand, and one can turn this piece to show both sides as well. For the type see: John Boardman, "Classical Phoenician Scarabs: A Catalog and Study", Archaeopress, 2003. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389023
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This powerful piece is a seated Colima warrior that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 14 inches high. This reddish-brown seated warrior has long youthful limbs, and is seen with the raised right arm balanced on his knee. His cupped right hand perhaps once held an implement, or a lance made from perishable material. This warrior also appears to be in a trance, and has a rounded face with closed "coffee-bean" style eyes. He is also seen wearing a pendant tied around the neck, a headdress/helmet with a small "feline headed" medallion, and raised inlay stone tattoos on the shoulders. The left side of his nude torso is also decorated with a band of black geometric "line-design" tattoos. This piece has very realistic body molding seen on the back side of the vessel, and has a very angular nose. His ears are also pierced for earrings, and overall, this warrior exudes a regal like appearance. This piece was offered for the deceased, and was likely a "protector-type" figurine. The form of this Colima piece is also rare, and the figurine offered here is a rare example that is also known as the "Coahuayana Valley" type. This piece is also intact with no apparent repair and/or restoration, and has some spotty and minute black mineral deposits. A superb large example with a high degree of eye appeal. For the type see: R. Townsend, "Ancient West Mexico, Art and Archaeology of the Unknown Past", The Art Institute of Chicago, 1998. Ex: Sotheby's Parke Bernet, Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Dec. 1981, no. 165. ($2,200.00 realized.) Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 2004, no. 268. ($4000.00-$6,000.00 estimates). Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: