Apolonia Ancient Art offers ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Pre-Columbian works of art Apolonia Ancient Art
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1392177
Apolonia Ancient Art
$465.00
This appealing piece is an Inka bronze tumi that dates circa 1450-1550 A.D., and is approximately 4 inches high, by 3.6 inches wide, by .15 inches thick. This piece is intact and is in mint quality "as found" condition, and has a beautiful dark green patina. This piece also has some light brown earthen deposits, along with some spotty minute dark green mineral deposits that are adhered to sections of the piece. This piece was cast and then hammered into shape, and has a raised edge border that runs down from the curved blade to the base of the piece. This was added to give this piece some added strength, and shows that this piece was made with a great deal of skill. This tumi was also votive, and was likely added into the wrappings of a mummy, or was simply added into a tomb. This piece was likely a symbolic offering, and was also likely a "trade type" piece which served as a form of trade currency. This piece also represented the power of the Inka Empire, and this type of implement was also used for ceremonial sacrifice. A nice complete example with a high degree of eye appeal. This piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304461
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This group of Greco-Roman ceramics date circa 4th century B.C.-1st century A.D. All of these pieces are intact, and have no restoration/repair. This group are mainly household type wares, as they were likely used for everyday use, and this varied group has: (1) Greek blackware skyphos, approximately 7 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian dish, approximately 4.2 inches in diameter, by 1.5 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (2) Greek Apulian blackware lekythos, approximately 3.2 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Greek aryballos brown/black bottle, approximately 3.4 inches high, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. (1) Greek Apulian skyphos with olive painted design, approximately 2.25 inches high, circa 4th century B.C. (1) Roman red terracotta oil lamp, circa 1st century A.D. This group is a nice collection with a wide variety of types and shapes. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Metalwork : Pre AD 1000 item #1226590
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This powerful piece is a Chimu culture silver mask that dates circa Late Intermediate Period, 1000-1400 A.D. This piece is has a Lambayeque Valley, Peru, type of design, and is approximately 11.75 inches wide by 6 inches high by 1.2 inches in relief. This piece is also a large example for the type, and has silver with added copper metal plate. This piece also has a thin applied coat of original spotty red cinnabar than runs through the flat center section of the piece. This intact piece has a "box-type" nose construction, and is attached to the main body of the piece with folded over tabs. There are decorative small hand beaten rounded dot patterns, that are seen at each end of the ear sections, and these ear sections also show a rounded design which resemble ear spools. These main body of this piece is divided into three sections, and the middle section is the nose and "line-formed" mouth which is the focus of this piece, and the eyes seen in each of the two outer sections, frame the entire compact design of the face. On the back side of this piece, there are some textile remains seen between the main body of the piece and the "box-type" constructed nose section. This piece covered a "mummy-bundle" which was also wrapped in textiles, and this piece was likely wrapped around the face of the mummy along with additional textile wrapping. Depending on the status and wealth of the deceased, these Chimu masks could be of ceramic, of wood, or even cloth, but those of the most powerful were of gold and silver. This piece also has a dark gray patina, with several minute spotty black mineral deposits. Another analogous example of nearly the same size can be seen in Bonham's African, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian Art, Nov.2013, no. 33. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $11,875.00 realised.) This piece is also mounted within a black wooden shadow box, and clear Velcro tabs securely hold it into place which attaches this piece to the black backing. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1338480
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This superb quality Greek bronze coin (17mm) was minted in Pherai, and dates to the circa early 4th century B.C. This piece is graded EF+/EF+ (Superb quality), is approximately 17mm in diameter, and is scarce in this grade. This piece has on the obverse, the goddess Hekate facing right, wearing a laurel wreath and earring. The image of Hekate on ancient Greek coinage is rare, and is seldom seen. Hekate was called the daughter of Demeter or Pheraea, and was associated with the fertility of the ground. The ancient city of Pherai was also named after Pheraea as well. The reverse has a detailed head of a lion facing right with an open mouth, and the Greek lettering of PH-ERAI seen around the head of the lion. There is also water seen flowing forth from the lion's open mouth, and the image of the lion seen on this coinage may represent a public and/or sacred fountain. This piece also has an attractive even dark green patina, with some light dark green surface deposits. Pherai was a city located west of Mt. Pelion in Thessaly, and was the second largest city in ancient Thessaly after Larissa. Reference: Sear 2207. Ex: Harlan Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #594619
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,675.00
This Roman silver miniature eagle is extremely detailed, is a masterpiece of roman engraving, and dates circa 1st century B.C.- 1st century A.D. The quality and detail seen on this piece is mint to superb, and this piece probably was made by a gem engraver and/or coin die celator. This miniature silver piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, weighs approximately 11 gms, and sits on a custom clear/black plexiglas base. This piece rotates around on a small pin that is centered within a clear plexiglas post. This piece is also solid, as it was cast, then hand-worked with minute detail. This remarkable minute detail is especially seen within the wings and upturned head, and this type of workmanship reminds one of the Greek coins of Acragas, circa 472-420 B.C., that show a standing eagle in the process of devouring a captured hare. A coin such as this may have served as a model for the exceptional piece offered here, as the Roman artists strove to duplicate the earlier Greek artists. The minute detail, seen within the feathers of the wings and the tension portrayed in the neck with a slight twist, could only have been produced by a very accomplished artist. The pose of this piece is very refined from every angle, which is another point that defines this piece. The patina of this piece is aged to a light gray, which indicates that this piece has had contact with oxygen for quite some time and that it has not been recently cleaned. An exceptional piece with fine detail and one of the best Roman miniatures that has been offered. Ex: Private German collection. Ex: Private New York collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Stone : Pre AD 1000 item #1234381
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is an extremely large Mayan green jadeite tube that dates circa 600-900 A.D. This solid piece is approximately 8.5 inches long by 1.4 inches in diameter, and has a beautiful dark to light green color. The beautiful stone seen here is likely jadeite, rather than serpentine, as it is extremely dense. This interesting piece has a bow-drilled hole at each end which connect near the center, and the bow-drilled holes are approximately .5 to .6 inches in diameter which also slightly narrow within the tube. There is also a layer of gray calcite deposits seen on the inner surfaces, and a light mineralized patina on the outer surfaces as well. This piece is also not perfectly round, has a somewhat rectangular shape, and has a great deal of eye appeal. There is a very strong possibility that this scarce piece was used in Mayan smoking ceremonies, and/or may have been used in Mayan regalia and served as a decorative item in a headdress, a necklace, or a sacred ceremonial object. This piece is also somewhat heavy, as it is likely a dense green jadeite which was sacred to the Maya. According to Francis Robicsek, in "The Smoking Gods", University of Oklahoma Press, 1978, p. 73, Robicsek elaborates on the forehead tube that was used to identify God K: "Forehead tube thought to represent a cigar. This is a fairly constant trademark of this deity. The identification of God K of any portrait lacking the forehead tube is suspect. It is nearly always present on ceramic representations and on stone carvings, but is usually absent from paintings in the codices. The object may be tubular or funnel-shaped, or it may resemble a celt. Sometimes it is undecorated, but more often it is striated, dotted, or marked with oval symbols. It also varies greatly in size and, if painted, in color. As a rule the tube emerges from the forehead; however, in two paintings, both of them on Peten ceramics, it protrudes from the mouth. On most portrayals the handle of the tube is sunk into the head and it is not visible; on others it emerges at the nape. As discussed earlier, these tubes probably represent cigars, but the possibility that they may represent torches or celts cannot be excluded." In addition, the piece offered here may also have been used by the Maya relative to the relationship of the royal elite to God K, and may have been used by the Maya as noted above in some capacity as a decorative element and/or used relative to the smoking culture of the ancient Maya. This piece also sits on a custom display stand. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Private Arizona collection. Ex: Private CO. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1299213
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This scarce Greek Attic "Black-Figure" kylix dates circa late 6th century-early 5th century B.C., and is approximately 9.75 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.7 inches high. This piece is in superb condition, and is intact with no noticeable repair/restoration. This piece is a "Type B" form, and has a wide and shallow draft for the inner bowl, two attached rounded and looping handles, and a slightly raised disk seen above the thick base disk. (For the "Type B" form, and the authoritative work on Attic Black-Figure painters, see J.D. Beazley, "Attic Black-Figure Vase Painters", Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1956.) There is also a solid black inner glaze, along with a dotted tondo seen within a tan reserve. The outer surface of this fine cup has two attractive large black palmettes, seen on each side, which alternate between three black floral patterns. There is also a solid lustrous black glaze seen below the palmettes, and this continues to the top of the base disk. Another analogous example of identical size and design was offered in Bonhams Antiquities, London, Oct. 1996, no. 14. (250-280 Pound estimates, 450 Pounds realized, approximately $910.00 US. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1250013
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,675.00
This extremely rare and cute piece is a Moche blackware feline that dates Moche I Period, circa 300-100 B.C. This early Moche piece is approximately 8.25 inches long by 7.2 inches high. This black glossy glazed piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and has some attractive light brown burnishing with some minute spotty black mineral deposits. This cute piece is a reclined feline that is seen with his long-tailed prey in his mouth, and this prey appears to be a small mammal and/or mouse. This feline's powerful bared teeth are seen holding it's prey securely in place, and this feline also appears to be relaxed, as he is seen reclined with his lower torso to one side along with his wavy tail. This feline is also seen with forward-curving ears, graceful incised whiskers, rectangular nose, and a compact body. There is also a stirrup-spout at the top of the body, and male attributes are seen between the hind legs. This type of Moche ceramic normally does not have prey in his mouth, and as such, is an extremely rare type. Another analogous blackware reclined feline piece, without the prey, is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, Dec. 1981, no. 14. (See attached photo. $1,200.00-$1,800.00 estimates, $1,210.00 realized.) The feline offered here may be a rare black jaguar, or a smaller feline such as a puma. Wild felines held a special place in the mythology of the ancient Americas. The felines special night vision combined with their powers as hunters were often likened to the power of shamans who would incorporate feline elements into their costumes or paraphernalia. The piece seen here also has enlarged eyes, which emphasize this creature's excellent night vision, and the face of this feline has anthropomorphic characteristics. This type of piece is extremely rare, as it is a type that has the caught prey, is in superb condition, and has great eye appeal. Ex: Gayle Grayson Gallery, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Estate of Daniel J. and Ruth Edelman, Chicago, Ill. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Glass : Pre AD 1000 item #583883
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,165.00
This mint quality Roman glass bottle dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D., and is approximately 6.3 inches high by 5.3 inches in diameter. This mint quality piece has an extended flat and thin upper rim which is intact, and as such, is a rare example for the type, as most Roman glass vessels of this type have a cracked and/or broken upper rim. This attractive vessel also has an exceptional multi-colored patina, and is much better than most examples of this type, as the patina is very thick in sections. This vessel is also a light blue-green color, and has light brown and white calcite deposits that are seen both on the inside and outside surfaces. (For an analogous example, see "Roman and Pre-Roman Glass in the Royal Ontario Museum" no. 146, p.58.) The exceptional piece offered here is seldom seen on the market in this mint quality, and has a great deal of eye appeal. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1136766
Apolonia Ancient Art
$725.00
This esoteric little piece is a Greek Boeotian terracotta that dates from the early to the mid 5th century B.C. This intact piece is approximately 5.8 inches high, and has no repair/restoration. This piece is a light brown/red terracotta, and there are traces of a white slip and tan earthen deposits. This appealing piece was mold made and depicts a nude young man, who is seen holding a pet cock against his body in the crook of his right arm, and in his left hand, an aryballos with a strigil. This standing young man is seen completely nude, and generally, this Boeotian terracotta type normally has the standing nude young man wearing a symmetrical himation, which is seen from the front framing his nude body from his back and sides. (See attached photo of a young man wearing a himation, which is seen in the British Museum and in "Greek Terracottas" by R.A. Higgins, Methuen & Co. Pub., London, 1967, Pl. 33, no. E.) This piece also has a large rectangular vent hole seen at the back, has the left leg slightly forward, and the figure is seen on a square base that is open on the inside. According to Higgins on page 77 in the reference noted above, "The purpose of these pieces would seem to be rather different from that of most Greek terracottas, which tended at most periods to represent deities, for these are clearly human. Many were found in tombs, and it is hard to escape the conclusion that they were intended to serve the same purpose as the Egyptian ushabtis-to minister to the needs of the dead in the next world." The piece seen here is a scarce type, as the young man is seen completely nude, and is not seen partially clothed with a himation. The completely nude type may also predate the types that are seen wearing a himation, and are likely the successors to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture that dates circa 510-490 B.C. The piece offered here has stylistic features that are analogous to the Greek "Kouros" type in sculpture such as: the stiff upright pose with one leg advanced slightly forward, a totally nude body, and square shoulders. This nude young man also appears to be on the way, or returning from the gymnasium, as the aryballos held oil for exercise, and the strigil was used to clean it from the body. A scarce piece with a great deal of eye appeal. A custom black wooden display stand is also included. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1383326
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This piece is a Greek blackware kylix that dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 10 inches wide from handle to handle, by 2.1 inches high. This piece is intact with no repair and/or restoration, and has a deep lustrous black glaze on the inner and outer surfaces, save for the bottom of the raised ring base that has an unglazed section known as the "reserve" section, and this is a light red terracotta. This attractive piece has an impressed "star pattern" with four acanthus leaves in the bottom center of the bowl, along with two curved handles that are solidly attached to the vessel. This piece also has some spotty white calcite deposits with a beautiful multi-colored iridescent patina, and overall, is in it's natural "as found" condition. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1362902
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This intact piece is an attractive Daunian funnel krater that dates to the 4th century B.C. This large piece is approximately 8.25 inches high, by 10.4 inches wide through the center of the vessel. This superb example has no repair/restoration, is in mint quality "as found" condition, and in addition, it is also a thick-walled ceramic which lends this vessel a great deal of durability. This piece was likely used to hold wine or a grain commodity, and was likely used in life, as well as in the afterlife as a votive type vessel. This piece was very functional, as it was designed with a funnel at the top, which made it easy to pour a liquid or grain into the vessel for use and/or for storage. This piece also has two handles at each end of the globular body, and two raised decorative elements that may resemble a human form. This piece also has attractive light to dark brown geometric "line designs" that run around the vessel, and are also seen on the top inside surface of the funnel. The piece offered here also has some spotty white and light brown mineral deposits, which are light to heavy in various sections of the vessel, and there is also some attractive root marking as well. This piece is also a better quality example than what is normally seen, as it also has not been over cleaned, and is a nice example for the type. For a comparable piece see "La Ceramica Geometrica Della Daunia", by Ettore M. De Juliis, Firenze, 1977, Pl. III, No. 26. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1323656
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This attractive Greek silver triobol was minted in Phokis in central Greece during the Classical Period, circa 460-430 B.C. This coin weighs 3.0 gms, has a dark gray patina, and is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF). The obverse of this interesting coin has a facing bull, and the reverse features the bust of Artemis facing right, with her hair bound with a fillet. The face of this young goddess also has a pleasing smile that is also designed with an earlier "Archaic Period" artistic style. There are four letters seen around the bust of this young goddess, with each letter seen at each corner of the incuse square, and these letters represent the name of "Phokis". The facing bull seen on the obverse may also represent a sacrificial bull, and has very high relief. The coin offered here is a superb example for the type, as most of these examples are found in Very Fine grade (VF), and have a great deal of wear. References: Sear 2348. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1365159
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These eight complete Greek "sling bullets" date to the 5th-4th century B.C., and are approximately 1 to 1.6 inches in length, by .4 to .7 inches in diameter. These pieces all have some light mineral deposits, and have a light dark gray-brown to tan patina. These relatively heavy lead pieces were mold made, and one can easily discern each half of the piece that fitted into the "two-part mold". These pieces were fitted into a hand sling that generated tremendous force and speed as they were released from the sling. These weapons also have an almond shape, as most lead "sling bullets" have, and this shape provided a stable aerodynamic flight. These pieces also have some light marking and minute impact dents that indicate that many of these pieces were likely in battle. These interesting pieces are all different sizes, and are also fitted into a custom display case. Ex: Joel Malter collection, Los Angeles, CA., circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
Apolonia Ancient Art
$5,875.00
These two rare and superb carved wooden panels are French, and date to the late Gothic period, circa 1590-1680 A.D. These pieces are a matching pair, although they have slight differences. Both of these carved panels are approximately 7.8 inches wide by 17.75 inches high, and are mounted in frames that are approximately 11.75 inches wide by 28 inches high. These outer frames date circa 1800-1850, and were the mounting for the inner carved panels. The two panels offered here, along with several additional panels, are also thought to have been originally set into a private manor house in Normandy. The bulk of these panels were sold at auction in San Francisco, CA., by Butterfield & Butterfield Co. in June 1996. Many of these panels, which were religious in nature, were identified as being produced by artisans who were employed in the area of Coutances, France, where the massive 13th century Gothic cathedral of Notre Dame was built. The panels seen here were finely carved and have great detail, and the condition of both panels offered here is exceptional. These two panels each display two caryatids that are seen back to back, and are carved in high relief. The caryatids were known in antiquity as the priestesses of Artemis at Caryae, and were often seen as a draped female figure that supported an entablature. The figures seen on these two panels are part lion, with the lion's paw feet, part bird, with the detailed feathered wings, and part woman, with the female breasts and faces. The raised hair comb and luxuriant wavy hair is very detailed as well, and is an excellent mark that the artist that carved these pieces was very skilled. Ex: Private French collection, circa 1930's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Pre AD 1000 item #1356955
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,285.00
This interesting piece is an Etruscan red-figure stemmed plate that dates circa 4th century B.C. This piece is approximately 5.45 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has been classified as being from the "Genucilia Group", and the group name derives from an example that had the Etruscan name "P. Genucilia" inscribed under its stemmed foot. This piece also has been described as a "star plate", as noted by Prof. Mario Del Chiaro in "Etruscan Red-Figure Vase Painting at Caere", University of California, 1974. The "five pointed wave pattern" seen on the top side of this piece also resembles a "star burst". The "wave pattern" seen on these vessels are also known to have only five of these "points" as well, and why there is generally a "five pointed wave pattern" seen on these vessels is unknown. The "five pointed wave pattern" seen on this piece frames a young goddess facing left that is seen wearing long earrings and a sakkos over her hair. The sakkos has "X patterns" within, and the entire composition is done with a dark black polychrome over a light tan terracotta. This intact piece has a raised stemmed base, and has some spotty white calcite and mineral deposits seen in the low relief sections of the vessel. The bottom of the vessel has several old collection numbers seen including: "P401", "1026", and "Lot 60, Gray Coll., Sotheby's, June 88". This piece also has two "X" graffiti marks seen on the top side inscribed over the face of the young goddess. This piece was also used as an offering plate in sanctuaries, and the "X" pattern graffiti, along with the "X" patterns seen within the sakkos design, may also indicate the workshop where this piece was made and/or the artist who produced this piece. The overall design of this piece makes this a very interesting ancient ceramic, and is rare in this intact condition with vibrant painted images. (Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, London, April 2011, no. 233. 800.00-1,200.00 Pounds estimates, 2125 Pounds realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Private English collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, London, June 1988. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1333672
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
These ten little miniature Corinthian ceramics date circa 600-550 B.C., and are miniature ceramics that are votive in nature. They are approximately .75 inches high, by 2.8 inches wide for the near identical five (5) skyphoi; 1.5 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide for the larger skyphos; 1.2 inches high, by 1.25 inches wide for the two kantharos; 1.25 inches high, by 1.8 inches wide for the smaller hydria; and 2.9 inches high, by 2.5 inches wide for the larger hydria. One of the kantharos and the larger hydria have a black glaze, and the balance of the pieces have a light tan buff surface, with some added dark brown and light red line design. These miniature pieces are scarce on the market, as they are votive, and reflect a trend in Corinthian pottery production of miniature vessels that seem to have been created exclusively as votives. Their small size precludes any practical use or function, and various examples of skyphoi and other vessel shapes have been found in a variety of sanctuaries and sacred places. These type of pieces have also played a role in the ritual activity at these sites. These pieces are all intact, save for a missing handle on one of the kantharos, and some minute chips seen on the larger hydria. Overall, these ten pieces are a superb group that also has some light mineral deposits and root marking, and best represent a sacred ritual as there are three different ceramic types seen within the group. (Another group of seven pieces was sold at Sotheby's Antiquities, London, Feb. 1987, no. 227. 800-100 pounds estimates.) These pieces also come with a custom display stand. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #987545
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This extremely rare piece is a Greek Apulian trefoil oinochoe that shows an expressive theatrical mask, which is seen in profile facing right, and dates circa 380-350 B.C. This piece is classified as a "Type II Oinochoe", otherwise known as a "Chous", and is approximately 4.6 inches high. This attractive piece is also intact, and is in superb to mint quality condition with no repair/restoration or overpaint. This extremely rare piece has also been attributed to the "Truro Painter", and has very vibrant colors, which are a glossy black, light red, and white. There are also some heavy white calcite deposits seen within the vessel, on the edge of the trefoil mouth, and on the bottom base ring. The detailed theatrical mask is seen centered within a light red frame which has a floral design at the bottom, and there are several attractive white dot highlights seen within this light red frame as well. The lively theatrical mask depicted on this piece is a type used by a character in a Greek comedy play known as a "phylax play", and this type of "phylax mask" was designed with bushy black hair, short black beard, open mouth, and copious facial wrinkles. This type of "phylax mask" was defined by Trendall as "Type B", and this type of mask was often produced by the "Truro Painter", circa 380-350 B.C., on Greek Apulian chous vessels of this type. Trendall also stated that the heads of the Truro Painter "often wear white head-bands", and the detailed theatrical "phylax mask" seen on the piece offered here also has a very prominent white head-band. (See A.D. Trendall, "Phlyax Vases", Second Edition, BICS Supplement 20, 1967. Another vessel of this type is seen in the Virginia Museum in Richmond, Virginia, no. 81.53.) The expressive theatrical "phylax mask" seen on the beautiful vessel offered here, and the Virginia Museum vessel noted above, are both designed as a singular depiction, and as such, is a subject type seldom seen on Greek Apulian vessels. In addition, the "phylax mask" seen here on this rare vessel is a sharp detailed example which is seldom seen on the market today. An analogous Apulian chous of this type was offered in Christie's Antiquities, New York, June 2008, no.195. (Approximately 7.5 inches high, $5,000.00-$7,000.00 estimates, $12,500.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Donna Jacobs Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan, circa 1980's. Ex: Robert Novak collection, St. Louis, MO. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1392002
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This scarce piece is a Huari bowl that dates to the Middle Horizon period, circa 550-1050 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.5 inches high, by 6.8 inches in diameter, and has white, black, dark orange, and dark red colors. This interesting piece has a flat bottom and an oval opening at the rim. This piece has a mirror image design that appears to be a "jugate-designed" type image, which are two heads back-to-back with a shared central white eye. This image also likely represents a sacred mythical creature that could be part feline, as there are also black dots seen within the design that could represent jaguar spots. There are also two raised bands that rise above the main design, and in addition, there are white and black dots that frame the entire image which may be celestial in nature. There is a "key pattern" that forms a ground line, and they also divide the vessel into two halves, along with a "chevron" pattern that is a hallmark design seen on Huari ceramics. This vessel could have been used in a sacred ceremony, and may also have served as a seed storage jar. This piece also has an ancient repair, as indicated by two bow-drilled holes that held a cord wrapping which held a crack together. This piece is complete, and has some minor crack fill seen mostly at the base that was done 30 plus years ago. This piece also has some attractive spotty white calcite deposits seen on the inside and outer surfaces. An interesting piece that has a very complex design. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Faience : Pre AD 1000 item #1161417
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is an Egyptian faience amulet of a seated Bastet, which dates circa 1100-800 B.C., Late New Kingdom/3rd Intermediate Period. This piece is approximately 2.25 inches high, and is a large example for the type. This mint quality and complete piece is a seated Bastet lion headed goddess that is seen holding a shrine-shaped sistrum, and is a rarer type than what is normally seen, which is the more common openwork hoop-shaped sistrum. The sistrum was a rattling musical instrument that was connected with ceremony, festivity, and merry-making. This sistrum attribute identifies this amulet as being Bastet, rather than the lion headed goddess Sekhmet, which is often the case, and according to Carol Andrews in "Amulets of Ancient Egypt", University of Texas Press, 1994, p. 32: "Of all the mained lion goddesses who were revered for their fierceness Bastet alone was 'transmogrified' into the less terrible cat, although even she often retained a lion-head when depicted as a woman, thus causing much confusion in identification. The female cat was particularly noted for its fecundity and so Bastet was adored as goddess of fertility and, with rather less logic, of festivity and intoxication. This is why, as a cat-headed woman, she carries a menyet collar with aegis-capped counterpoise and rattles a sistrum." In addition, Andrews states on p. 33: "All such pieces must have been worn by women to place them under the patronage of the goddess and perhaps endow them with her fecundity. They were essentially to be worn for life, but could have potency in the Other World." The piece offered here has a suspension hoop seen behind the head, and there is no apparent wear within this hoop which suggests that this attractive piece was votive, and this may also explain it's mint quality condition as well. The seated goddess is seen on an elaborate openwork throne whose sides are formed into the sinuous body of the Egyptian snake god Nehebkau. The facial features of this appealing piece have fine detail, and also have a rather haunting and mysterious look. This rare faience amulet has nice minute spotty dark brown mineral deposits that are seen over a light green/blue glaze, and this piece is in mint condition, with no cracks and/or chips, which are often seen on faience amulets of this large size. The molding of this piece has exceptional detail, and compares to an analogous example of the same type and size seen in Christie's Antiquities, Paris, March 2008, lot no. 115. (7,000.00-10,000.00 Euro estimates, 5,625 Euros realized. Note: This piece has the more common hoop-shaped sistrum, and is from the Charles Gillot collection, circa 1853-1903. See attached photo.) The piece offered here comes with a clear plexiglas display stand, and simply sits on the top surface, and can be easily lifted off. An exceptional large piece that is in mint condition, and is also a rare type. Ex: Robert Rustafjaell collection, circa 1890-1909. Published: "An Egyptian Collection formed by R. de Rustafjaell Bey", by the Ehrich Galleries, New York. Ex: Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York, deaccessioned circa 2011. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1313512
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This appealing piece is a Greek Hellenistic period bronze torso of a striding Herakles, and dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 3.1 inches high, and is mounted on a custom display stand. This piece shows a striding nude Herakles who is seen wearing his lion's skin cloak draped over his left shoulder and arm, and this cloak is attached by a round fibula seen on his right shoulder. This lion's skin cloak is also designed with a stippled dotted design, which denotes this garment as being made from an animal skin. This torso has an intact left arm, and this Herakles figurine appears to be holding a round patera or possibly a vessel of some sort. This figurine also has both muscular legs, with the right leg seen striding forward, and the movement of this powerfully muscular body is easily seen. The torso is very well defined, and displays a very high degree of art, and is much better than most figurines of this type. This attractive piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and is evenly seen around the entire piece. This piece is an exceptional Greek bronze torso with an equally exceptional patina, and is scarce on today's market in this condition. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Near Eastern : Pre AD 1000 item #1392094
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This lively piece is a Parthian/Near Eastern bronze leaping lion handle, and dates circa 150 B.C.-225 A.D. This piece is approximately 3.8 inches long, by 3.8 inches high, as seen on it's custom display stand. This piece is also complete, with no repair and/or restoration, and was cast as one solid piece. The lively lion seen here has his head turned to the right, and appears to look back at the individual who can easily hold this piece firmly with one hand. The lion is also seen with his mouth open, and appears to be roaring at the viewer. The lion is also seen leaping, and his two front paws were designed to fit over the rim of a vessel, as there is also a groove under the paws. This piece is a rare example, and is likely Parthian, as the artistic style of this piece is very analogous to other works of art attributed to this culture. (For another analogous example attributed to the Parthian period that is of the exact size and type, see: "Ancient Bronzes, Ceramics, and Seals. The Nasli M. Heeramaneck Collection of Ancient Near Eastern, Central Asiatic, and European Art.", Los Angeles County Museum of Art Pub., 1981, no. 659. See attached photos.) This piece also has a beautiful dark brown and green patina, and is mounted on a custom marble display stand. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #599095
Apolonia Ancient Art
$825.00
This superb Roman bronze piece is an applique with the image of Silenus. This piece dates circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D., and is in the form of a facing head, with an attached peg that extends about 1.5 inches from the back side of the applique. This piece was probably mounted in an object such as a furniture piece, or a bronze and wooden door, or a composite work or arms such as a Roman shield. A piece with this type of design, with the extended peg, could have fit in a number of objects. The Sileni were native not to Greece, but to Phrygia in Roman Asia, and personified the genii of springs and rivers. Unlike the Satyrs who derive chiefly from the he-goat, the Sileni derive rather from the horse, whose tail hooves, and even ears they possess. This piece clearly shows the horse ears and shows Silenus as a fat old man, snub-nosed, always drunk, who was in the retinue of Dionysus. Silenus was the tutor of Dionysus and had helped him form his character, and the bust seen here is a very powerful and intense image of Silenus. The diameter of this piece is approximately 1.4 inches and the length is approximately 2 inches. This piece has a dark green patina with red highlights and the detail is superb. There are also some heavy dark green mineral deposits seen on the extended peg. This piece is mounted with clay on a custom black/plexiglas base and can easily be removed. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #944693
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This rare piece is a Greek bronze stand that was likely made for an aryballos type glass vessel that has a rounded bottom (See attached photo showing a glass aryballos with a rounded bottom that is dated from the same period as the bronze stand offered here). The piece offered here dates circa 7th-6th century B.C., and is approximately 2.8 inches high, by 2 inches in diameter for the upper bowl. This attractive piece is intact, and has a nice dark green patina with some dark green deposits. This piece has some bottom roughness and a minute dent on the upper bowl, otherwise it is in superb condition. This piece is also a two-part construction, with the bowl and the stem cast as separate pieces. The outer bottom of the bowl has nice decorative inset concentric circles that are a hallmark design feature of the Greek Geometric Period, circa 8th-7th century B.C. The base stem has decorative bands that are designed in relief, and this allows one to easily grasp this piece, and in addition, all of these decorative elements give this piece a great deal of eye appeal. A nice rare piece that is seldom seen on the market. Ex: M. Ward Gallery, New York. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1304362
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Greek Boeotian blackware kantharos, and dates circa 450-425 B.C. This piece is approximately 7.6 inches high, by 7.5 inches wide from handle to handle, and is a large example. This esoteric piece has a nice even lustrous black glaze, with a multi-colored iridescent patina over the glaze, and a high degree of eye appeal. This Greek kantharos is a Classic Period type vessel, as can be seen with the two looped handles and the long stemmed base, and this piece is also classified as being a "Type A" type due to this design. This type of piece is also seen on many Greek Classical Period coins and painted ceramics. This type of vessel was used for drinking wine at drinking parties which is known as a "symposium", and was also used for ceremonial offerings. This superb and beautiful piece is intact, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen in various sections of the piece, and is heavy at the inner bottom of the vessel. There is also some minor roughness seen in sections of the inner bowl, otherwise this piece is in near flawless condition. This piece also have a deep even black glaze seen on the inner and outer surfaces, and there are no pressure cracks and/or repair seen anywhere on this vessel. (Another analogous example was offered at Christie's Antiquities, London, Oct. 2011, no. 71. This piece was approximately 11 inches high, with a faint painted white ivy tendril that runs around the main body of the vessel. $4,600.00-$7,500.00 estimates, $9,246.00 realized.) (Another analogous example can be seen in the Louvre Museum, Paris, Inv. no. MNC 670, and bears an incised inscription that is a sacred dedication. The lengthy inscription is in the Boeotian alphabet, and this vessel is thought to have come from Thespiae.) The attractive piece offered here is scarce to rare in this intact condition, and is seldom offered on the market. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #958827
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,675.00
This impressive piece is a Greek bronze bead necklace, and this necklace is comprised of solid cast bronze beads that date to the Geometric Period, circa 800-700 B.C. This necklace is made from 13 beads which together measure approximately 17.75 inches end-to-end. All of the bronze beads are "biconical" in design, and seven of the larger beads have a raised terminal end, and a raised central ridge. The largest central bead has double-raised ridge terminal ends, and this bead is approximately 2.75 inches long. The other six largest beads measure approximately 1.5, 2, 2.4, 2.3, 1.75, and 1.25 inches long. The smaller six "spacer" beads are approximately .5 to .75 inches long. All of these beads have an attractive dark brown/green patina, and are all in superb and intact condition. In addition, these pieces have had little cleaning, and have a natural patina which adds to their appeal as stand alone individual collectables. These beads can also be easily strung on a leather cord, and can be worn as is, or can easily be separately mounted into several different works of jewelry. The weights of the beads vary widely, and the central bead weighs approximately 29.4 gms. The other six larger beads weigh approximately 15.5, 33.5, 59.8, 30.7, 29.5, and 12.1 gms. These beads were separately hand cast, and they are all slightly different in size and weight. Two of the larger beads also have a hole from the central shaft, which probably allowed for the addition of pendants and/or other beads which hung down from these two beads. These beads were likely worn in life, and may also have been votive. Examples of the bead types offered here can be seen in "Greek Jewellery: 6,000 Years of Tradition", Athens 1997, p. 89, nos. 71-72. These beads are also are now scarce in the market, and as a group, these pieces have a high degree of eye appeal and display very well. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that these pieces are authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1399716
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This lively and rare Roman-Egyptian bronze dancer dates to the Late Hellenistic Period-Early Imperial Period, circa 1st century B.C.-1st century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.8 inches high, and is an extremely rare to rare example that was likely produced in Alexandria, Egypt. This piece is a lively dancer, also known as a "grotesque dancer", that displays a great deal of movement with a twisted torso, and appears to be seen in a spinning dance. This figure also has his over sized genitals exposed behind, and has "dwarf-like" features with a raised hump on his upper back. This vibrant piece may also be an actual representation of a bald and naked deformed dancing dwarf that was popular during the late Hellenistic period. This piece has a beautiful dark green patina with spotty red highlights, and is a complete example save for the missing lower left leg and the foot of the right leg. (Another analogous example approximately 3 inches high, and attributed to the same period, was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, Vol. XVIII, 2007, no. 41, for $8,500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1360469
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is an Egyptian scarab that dates to the New Kingdom Period, XIX Dynasty, circa 1320-1200 B.C. This piece also falls within the period that Ramesses II ruled Egypt, circa 1304-1237 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.4 inches long, by .85 inches wide, by .7 inches high, and is in superb to mint condition with no repair and/or restoration. This piece is designed with the body of a beetle, and has a lovely light brown patina, with some minute white calcite and spotty black mineral deposits seen on various sections of the piece. This piece is a glazed steatite material and is a very solid example, as it also served as a seal that has a standing Bes god seen on the underside. The carving of this Bes image is also very deep, and the seal makes a very clear impression with high relief, as seen with the included clay impression that is attached to the custom display stand. This scarab amulet provided the wearer protection against evil, visible or invisible, and offered strength and power every day. In death, he or she who wore this amulet had the possibility of resurrection and being granted eternal afterlife, as this scarab ensured that the deceased heart would not give evidence against the deceased when he or she was being judged by the gods of the underworld. This scarab amulet also served as a seal with the image of Bes, who was a dwarf-like deity who was venerated as the protector of the home, family, and childbirth. The Bes seen on this beautiful piece is seen wearing a tall feather-crown, has a protruding tongue, and the ears of a lion. This piece is also very analogous to another scarce to rare example that is seen in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Inv. no. 76.031.3695. (See attached photo.) The scarce to rare piece offered here is also of exceptional quality, and is a type not often seen on the market. This piece also sits on a custom display stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Prehistorical item #1402347
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This intact and attractive piece is an Apulian-Gnathian pelike that dates to the late 4th century B.C., and is approximately 4.7 inches high. This piece has a thin black glaze with attractive light gray burnishing, and is an intact example with no repair and/or restoration. This vessel also has additional and detailed fine body molding seen at the upper rim, and above the ring base on the lower body of the vessel. There are added incised decorative tendril vines that run around the upper shoulder, and these incised elements are also seen on the neck of the vessel. There are also added white painted vine leaves and grape clusters, although faded, that are seen on this vessel as well. This piece has some minute root marking, and some light brown mineral deposits which also add to this vessel's eye appeal. A nice intact piece with fine body molding, and likely made by an accomplished potter. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288546
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This beautiful piece is a Greek gold diadem wreath that dates circa 3rd-1st century B.C. This piece is approximately 13 inches long by 1.4 inches high, and is a complete example. This intact piece has no restoration/repair, and is 100% original. This piece has eight large leaves, with four on each side that meet at the front center of the piece. The eight leaves are each attached to a band with attachment tabs, and these tabs are punched through the band and are folded back on the back side of the piece. There are two hooks at each end, and they simply tied this piece together at the back of the head. The overall construction of this piece is rather simple, but this also provided for a piece that has a great deal of eye appeal, as the leaves are easily seen on the crown of the head. This piece was also likely made for a young woman or child, and could have been worn during special events or in the grave. This piece is also a type that first appeared in the Hellenistic Period, and was popular throughout the ancient Greek world. This piece has some strength, and stays in a fixed position on it's custom display stand. This piece can also easily be removed from it's custom display stand, and once removed, can also be displayed on it's own, as it solidly put together. This piece also has some light brown deposits, some minute black dotted mineral deposits seen in various sections, and some spotty minute root marking. The color of this piece also is a brilliant gold, and has a beautiful faint multi-colored iridescent patina. One of the best examples for the type. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #598355
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a East Greek silver ladle that is of "Achaemenid" artistic style, otherwise known as the Persian Empire. This piece was likely made by a Greek artist, and this piece dates circa 6th-5th century B.C. This piece is a superb example and is complete, with no repair and/or breaks. This piece has a beautiful light gray patina, and has not been over cleaned, as there are several minute spotty black surface deposits. This piece was hammered into the shape seen here, and it has a shallow rounded bowl, a slender handle section of octagonal construction, and a looped rounded terminal section that terminates in the head of a bull/calf. The head of the bull/calf is finely molded and engraved. (For other published examples see Dietrich von Bothmer, "A Greek and Roman Treasury", The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, New York, 1984, p. 41, nos. 60-61.) This piece is also very similar to the piece seen in Sotheby's Antiquities, Important Antiquities from the Norbert Schimmel Collection, New York, Dec. 1992, no. 22. ($8,000.00-$12,000.00 estimates.) The Schimmel example is not only similar, but it is almost an exact match to the piece offered here. The bull/calf head is very analogous relative to both examples, and this is an indication that there is a possibility that both of these pieces came from the same workshop. In addition, the heights of both examples are nearly the same, as the Schimmel example is approximately 7.6 inches high, and the example offered here is approximately 7.75 inches high and weighs approximately 59 gms. These rare pieces were likely used to dip highly concentrated wine into water, as this allowed for an exact mix of wine to water, and the piece offered here and the Schimmel example may have both been made to exact specifications for mixing wine to water. The fact that this type of piece is silver, also points to the probably that this piece was formal table ware for a wealthy Greek noble. There is also a Byzantine period cross and globe stamped into the back side of the ladle, which is seen at the base of the handle. (See photo.) This piece was used later on, probably in the early Byzantine period circa 4th-5th century A.D., and likely in a Christian church or home. This piece survived for a long period of time, as it was utilized down into the Byzantine period. Another probable reason why this piece was used for a long period of time is that it is silver, and has a great deal of utility as a ritual piece. A custom black/clear plexiglas base is included and the piece is mounted on the base with clay and can easily be removed. Ex: F. Bernheimer collection. Ex: Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Nov. 1989, no. 256. Ex: Private New York collection. Ex: R. Poland collection. Ex: Pierre Berge & Associates, Archeologie, Paris, May 2011, no. 209. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including a French Passport Export Certificate.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1353952
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,285.00
This extremely rare coin is a Greek silver drachm from the Epirote Republic, and dates circa 234-168 B.C. This coin is in extremely fine condition (EF/EF) condition, weighs 5.0 grams, and is approximately 21mm in diameter. This coin has on the obverse: a detailed and laureate bust of Zeus facing left, a monogram at the lower front of the bust, and a Greek legend below and behind. The reverse has: a standing eagle on a thunderbolt facing left, with the legend "ADEI" before, and "PUTAN" behind, all within a laurel wreath that is seen framing the border. The legend seen on the obverse is extremely rare, and may refer to the magistrate that minted the coin and/or the name of the current ruler of the Epirote Republic. This coin may also be the only known recorded example with this obverse legend, in addition to, the bust of Zeus that is seen facing left which is seldom seen as well. The reverse legend refers to the Epirote Republic itself. The artistic style of the Zeus bust also has an extremely high degree of art, and is a better style that what is usually seen on the scarce coinage of this type. Another example of this coin type, without the obverse legend and the Zeus bust facing right, was sold by Numismatica Ars Classica in Zurich, Switzerland for 1,300 SF. The coin offered here is not only an extremely rare type, but is also in extremely fine condition. References: Franke, Epirus, 32ff (var.); SNG Cop 114. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #891841
Apolonia Ancient Art
$685.00
This extremely rare Greek Attic piece is a blackware glazed pyxis that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This piece has two sections that are both intact, and no repair/restoration. In addition, there are no minute cracks seen in both sections, and there are some heavy white calcite deposits with some attractive root marking that is seen in various sections of the vessel. This piece also has decorative white concentric circles that are seen on the top lid. This piece is approximately 4.8 inches high by 5.6 inches in diameter, and has some glaze loss, seen mostly on the top lid of the vessel. This top lid is actually a hidden cup that lifts out of the top of the vessel, and is approximately 2.4 inches high by 2.6 inches in diameter. This esoteric pyxis also has some analogous design features that are seen on Attic "West Slope" pyxides, such as high thin walls and an extended ring base. Greek Attic ceramics are often thin walled, as they were created with a high firing temperature, and this produced a durable light weight ceramic as the piece offered here. This type of vessel was often "votive", and served a variety of purposes. Some of these contained personal items that belonged to the deceased, some served as cinerary urns, and others contained cosmetics. The piece offered here may not have been exclusively "votive" in nature, as the lid/cup may have been used to measure a liquid or a solid such as grain. Whatever the case, this piece is an extremely rare Greek vessel, and is of a type and form that is not often seen on the market. Ex: Private Florida collection (1980's). Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1329528
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive piece is a Roman armor "belt fitting" plaque that dates circa 3rd-4th century A.D. This piece is approximately 2.5 inches wide, by 2.4 inches high, and is a complete example of a Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque type segment, which was a component of a Roman belt. This Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaque was prominently displayed on a Roman legionnaire with a frontal view, and Roman bronze "belt fitting" plaques of this type usually portrayed heroic scenes that illustrate several Roman gods and goddesses. The back side of this piece has four round studs that attached this piece to a thick leather backing, which also served as the inner layer of the belt. The right side of this piece has two round elongated hooks that likely fit into a pin, and/or into another segment of the entire belt. The belt that held this plaque was a large and wide example, and may also have wrapped around the torso of a legionnaire in order to secure a "scale-armor" mail type shirt. In addition, this belt may also have supported a "gladius" or "spatha" sword and scabbard, and this type of Roman belt was known as a "cingulum", which was generally worn around the waist and best represented the Roman military soldier in the 3rd century A.D. (For the type, see Peter Connolly, "Greece and Rome at War", Macdonald Phoebus Ltd, UK, 1981, pp. 260-261.) This scarce piece shows a standing nude Dionysus, otherwise known to the Romans as Bacchus, who is seen leaning right, and is holding a "thyrsus" in his left hand, and pouring a wine offering into the ground from an oinochoe in his right hand. There is also what appears to be a panther seen below, and ivy tendrils are seen to the right as well. The military symbolism of this piece is apparent, as the "thyrsus" was not only a beneficent wand of Bacchus, but was also a weapon that was used to destroy those who opposed his cult and the freedoms he represents. It is quite possible that an individual, or a Roman soldier, who wore this piece was also a member of this cult. This piece has a nice dark green patina with some spotty dark brown highlights, along with some minute dark black mineral deposits. This piece is an exceptional "belt fitting" plaque, and is scarce on the market. This piece also hangs on a custom Plexiglas stand and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1357958
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exceptional piece is a Greek/Scythian iron short sword that dates to the Hellenistic Period, circa 3rd-2nd century B.C. This attractive iron weapon is larger than most examples, and is approximately 12.9 inches high, by 3.5 inches wide at the hilt which is in the middle section of the piece. This scarce iron piece is dark brown, and has some spotty light brown highlights. This piece was also hand forged from iron, and is a "four-part construction" type piece. This piece is made up with a "V-shaped blade", a "decorative curved hilt", a "handle bar", and a "pommel end bar" that has a single rivet that holds it onto the "handle bar". This rivet is made from a section of the "handle bar" that fitted through the "pommel end bar", and was hammered down over the "pommel end bar" which holds it in place. The "decorative curved hilt" is identical on each side of the piece, and it gives a very esoteric look to the piece as well. The overall construction is very solid, and this piece is a very durable weapon. The "V-shaped blade" also has hammered "blood lines" down the center, and this strengthened the "V-shaped blade" and allowed for a tight fit in a scabbard. There is also a grooved "slot" seen on one side of the "handle bar", and this likely held a wooden or bone handle into place that was fitted over the "handle bar". The condition of this piece is superb to mint quality, and is one of the best recorded iron examples of this type of weapon. The surface has some minor pitting from hammering and wear, and the piece was conditioned by a major museum in Germany. This piece has no repair/restoration, and there is some minute fill at the extreme tip end, which has also prevented the tip from breaking off. This piece is of the type that has been found in ancient Thrace, and the region around the Black Sea. Overall, an exceptional large example with excellent preservation and metal quality. This piece also sits on a custom metal display stand. Another analogous example was offered by Royal Athena Galleries, New York, 2017, No. HM1102. (This Royal Athena Galleries piece is nearly the same length as the piece offered here, 11.25 inches long, and has some wear and losses. The Royal Athena piece is also offered at $7500.00. See attached photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1990's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1268923
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,875.00
This scarce and mint quality piece is a Greek Xenon culture plate that dates circa 350-325 B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 9 inches in diameter, by 2.4 inches high. This piece has a multi-iridescent deep black glaze, dark red/orange, and white colors. This piece is also mint quality with no repair/restoration, has some spotty white calcite deposits, minute root marking, and has a great deal of eye appeal. This piece is a footed plate that has a raised ring foot, and a deep bowl. The inner center of this beautiful piece has a silhouette of a young woman's bust that is facing left, and there is a floral element seen below. There is an ivy-leaf pattern seen running around the central bust, along with decorative "cross pattern" and "line/dotted pattern" bands that are seen running around the outer section of the overall painted design. The female bust likely represents Demeter and/or Persephone, and represents the change of the seasons, and/or the renewal of life which this represents. The female goddess is also seen wearing a sakkos with a hair tie, and the profile of her face shows a high degree of art, as this profile conveys an eternally young woman. This piece also has two holes in the ring base which allowed this piece to be hung in a private home or shrine, and this piece may also have been a votive piece that was placed in the tomb. The artistic style of this piece is analogous to the Xenon type culture pieces that also have a central subject that was depicted in silhouette form. These Greek Xenon culture pieces usually depict a standing swan or a running dog or hare, and most have an ivy leaf pattern, with a design rendered in a red/orange color over a deep black glaze as the piece offered here. There are very few Xenon examples that have the woman's bust of a goddess, and most Xenon vessels are designed as a kylix or a small kantharos cup. The Greek Xenon culture is native to southern Italy, and their culture was derived from mainland Greece. This piece also comes with a Plexiglas display stand. Ex: Private German collection circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1360771
Apolonia Ancient Art
$675.00
This Greek Thasos silver tetradrachm is mint state (FDC) to superb quality grade (EF+/EF+), and dates circa 2nd-1st century B.C. This superb graded example is approximately 33mm wide, and weighs 17.1 grams. This coin is also perfectly centered, and is struck in high relief. This attractive piece shows on the obverse (Obv.) a young bust of Dionysus facing right, wearing a detailed ivy leaf wreath with grape leaves and bunches. This ivy and grape leaf wreath, seen in the flowing hair of Dionysus, is also more detailed that what is usually seen as well. The artistic style of the young Dionysus is very fine, as the face conveys a young sweet Dionysus with wide open eyes and an open mouth, which are earlier Greek Hellenistic period conventions of art. The reverse (Rev.) shows a very muscular nude standing Herakles, holding a club in the right hand, and over the left arm, the cloak made from the skin of the Nemean Lion. The Greek lettering to the right reads "HERAKLES"; and below reads "THASOS", which also refers to the island Thasos where this coin was likely minted. This coin type is also classified as a Celtic imitation of the Thasos types, but this coin has a fine artistic style and was likely minted on the island of Thasos, and may also have been minted for trade with the Thracian interior. The depiction of the Thracian wine god Dionysus was a perfect choice for Thracian trade, as the worship of Dionysus was very widespread and ancient Thrace. This coin is a choice example, and has better artistic style that what is usually seen. Ex: Harlan Berk collection, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. References: Sear 1759; BMC 74; SNG Cop 1046. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1362411
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This superb Roman bronze is a portrait bust of the Roman emperor, Marcus Aurelius, and dates circa 170-180 A.D. This mesmerizing piece is approximately 1.35 inches high, by .8 inches wide, and is a complete bust with most of the lower neck. This piece was part of a figurine, and was broken at the lower neckline, and the bust is a complete example, with no cracks and no other noticeable areas of damage. This realistic portrait bust is in superb condition, and has a beautiful light to dark green patina with some minute red spotty highlights. In addition, there are some light green and blue deposits seen mostly on the inner surface of the piece. This piece is classified as a "Type IV" portrait of Marcus Aurelius, as it shows the emperor in an advanced age with a very full beard. The beard is also divided in the center of the chin that also shows parallel locks of hair. This "Type IV" convention of art can easily be seen on this portrait bust, along with the distinctive arc of hair that frames the forehead. The emperor is also seen wearing a diadem crown in the hair which also signifies the wearer as being regal in status. The overall look of the face also conveys the Stoic nature of this emperor-philosopher, and conveys a peaceful ideal. (For the portrait type see: Klaus Fittschen and P. Zanker, "Katalog Der Romischen Portrats in den Capitolinischen Museen und den Anderen Kommunalen Sammlungen der Stadt Rom", 3V., Berlin: P. von Zabern, 1983-2010.) Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus ruled from circa 161-180 A.D., along with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from circa 161 until Verus' death in 169. During his reign, the empire defeated a revitalized Parthian empire, and fought the Marcomanni, Quadi, and Sarmations with success during the Marcomannic Wars, but it was the Germanic tribes that Marcus fought incessantly with during the remaining years of his rule. The realistic portrait bust offered here was likely created during this time, and is likely a provincial portrait, which may also have been in a private shrine where the Roman legions were stationed near Germania along the Danube. Whatever the case, this portrait served a Roman well in the period in which it was created, and is an excellent image of this important emperor. This attractive piece also sits on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, New York and Geneva, Switzerland. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1321881
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This attractive ancient Greek coin is a Sikyon silver stater that dates circa 350-330 B.C. This coin is approximately 23 mm wide, weighs 11.8 gms, and is in good very fine/extremely fine condition (VF+/EF). This coin also has a light gray patina, perfect centering, and excellent metal, with some minute roughness seen mostly on the high relief sections of the obverse and reverse. This attractive coin features on the obverse the mythical creature Chimaera, facing left, with the letter "I" seen below the belly of the creature that is seen standing/walking on a ground line. The reverse features a dove flying left, with the letter "N" below the beak; all within a laurel wreath. The Chimaera was a celebrated monster who sprung from the union of Echidna and Typhon, and had three heads; those of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. The Greek hero Bellerophon with the support of Minerva, and the aid of the winged horse Pegasus, attacked and killed the Chimaera in an epic battle. The image of Chimaera, seen on the obverse of this coin, has a goat neck and head rising from it's back, and the head and body of a lion. The city of Sikyon chose this creature as a civic symbol, and is one of the few known images of this creature seen on ancient Greek coinage. This coin type is also highly desirable among collectors of ancient Greek coinage who collect coins that illustrate creatures known from ancient Greek myth. References: BMC 57. SNG Copenhagen 48. Ex: Harlan J. Berk collection, circa 1980's. I certify that this coin is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Pre AD 1000 item #1390809
Apolonia Ancient Art
$2,365.00
This rare piece is a Roman glass and turquoise pendant that dates to the 4th-5th century A.D., and is approximately 1.7 inches in diameter, by .35 inches thick. This piece is an exquisitely carved turquoise roundel with a laureate and cuirassed young male deity that is seen facing right. This roundel is also framed in a green glass bezel, and has a small hole for suspension seen at the top. The backside of this piece is also flat, and the glass bezel is very translucent which also adds to it's beautiful eye appeal. The glass also has sections of a thick multi-iridescent patina, and some root marking. The young male deity seen on this piece may also represent a Roman emperor seen as a god. This piece was also an object with a great deal of eye appeal in antiquity, and was meant to be seen. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1970's. Ex: Bank Leu Numismatik, Zurich, Switzerland, circa 2000's. (Note additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1215119
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This piece is a Mayan terracotta that dates from the Late Classic period, circa 600-900 A.D., and is approximately 6 inches high by 7.5 inches wide by 4.5 inches deep. This piece has powerful eye appeal, as it shows the Mexican rain god Tlaloc with large round eyes, scrolled upper lip, and exposed tooth row. This complete piece is a very large applique that was part of a extremely large vessel which may have had several of these applied appliques that ran around the outside of the vessel. There is original white pigment seen over the exposed teeth and round eyes, root marking seen in sections of the piece, and there are light brown and gray earthen deposits seen over the entire piece. The condition of this piece is intact, with little apparent crack fill, and this piece appears to have broken cleanly away from the main body of the vessel. A wall section of this large vessel also forms the backside of the piece offered here. The mix of Mexican and Mayan motifs in the Late Classic period is not uncommon, and another example of a Mayan terracotta with the Mexican rain god Tlaloc can be seen in "Pre-Columbian Art: The Morton D. May and The Saint Louis Art Museum Collections" by Lee Parsons, New York, 1980, no. 318, p. 205. The Mexican rain god Tlaloc has also appeared since the Early Classic period in the Maya zone, and is often related to scenes of "autosacrifice" involving the nobility, in which they self extract and offer their own blood. This "blood letting ceremony", as an offering to the gods, is also a metaphor for rain, although the Maya had their own rain deity, Chaac. The piece offered here may also have been part of a large ceremonial blood letting vessel. In relation to the letting of blood, the Tlaloc deity also appears on war shields, as seen on Mayan terracotta figures. This piece is scarce to rare, and sits on a custom black metal stand. Ex: E. Duncan collection, Stilwell, Kansas, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378394
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This scarce piece is an Egyptian faience two-faced amulet bust that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.25 inches high, and is an intact example. This piece was originally made as a figurine of the Egyptian god Pataikos, and has an attractive light green glaze. This interesting piece has nearly two identical "mold-made" faces seen on each side of the bust in a "Janus" type design. This appealing Egyptian bust also shows the two faces sharing the same bald head, and these faces have deeply molded features that convey a slight smile and serene expression. This piece was likely made as a "protector" type work of art, and may also have doubled as the god Bes and Pataikos, thus having additional protective powers. The Egyptian god Pataikos was derived from a Phoenician "dwarf-form", and was a "protector" type god which is also sometimes referred to as a "Ptah-Seker" god. Pataikos was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was always present among the workers in precious-metal workshops in Old Kingdom scenes of daily life. The piece seen here was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken in antiquity, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This scarce piece is in superb condition, has a nice colored glaze, and is a large example for the type. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1288894
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,275.00
This attractive piece is a Greek silver straining spoon that dates circa 3rd century B.C.-1st century A.D. This rare piece is approximately 4.9 inches long, by .9 inches in diameter at the bowl. This piece was hand beaten into shape, and the bowl was formed over a mold and attached to the shaft. There are five holes seen in the base of the bowl, and this piece likely served as a rare spice strainer at the table of a wealthy individual. There is also a curled hoop at the end, and this likely was hung in an ancient kitchen/household. This piece may also have served in a commercial capacity, and may also have been used to measure out a valuable "powder" type commodity. This specialized silver piece is seldom seen on the market, as it has fine construction and is seldom found as an individual type find. This piece also is somewhat analogous to the late Hellenistic silver spoon that is known as a "cochleare", as this type of piece also has a small rounded bowl which is attached to a shaft with a pointed terminal end. This type of "cochleare" spoon does not have any holes in the bottom of the bowl, and is thought to have been used for eating eggs and shellfish. For the "cochleare" type see: "Greek and Roman Gold and Silver Plate" by D.E. Strong, Methuen & CO., Ltd., 1966, p. 155. The complete piece offered here also has an attractive dark gray patina, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This dainty little piece is an exceptional example of Greek silver plate, and is seldom seen on the market. This piece hangs on a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1307715
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This attractive piece is a Mayan stone hacha that dates to the Late Classic Period, circa 550-950 A.D. This piece is approximately 6.7 inches high, and is intact with no repair/restoration. This complete piece is a serpent head with opened jaws that enclose a human head adorned with disk earspools, and each has sunken oval eyes. The serpent head has a crenelated upper lip, and the entire composition of this piece resembles an individual, more likely a warrior, who is seen wearing a hooded costume in the form of a serpent head. Another interpretation of this piece is that this piece represents a Mayan "Vision Serpent", with a warrior brought forth from the mouth of the serpent. This warrior also refers to a Mayan warrior cult that was linked to the evening star (Venus). This cult was also tied to the accession rites of the king, and a large component of these accession rites included the king's wife who underwent a bloodletting ritual so that she could communicate with this warrior, who may have been a dead ancestor, and/or a symbol of the king's role as warrior in this cult. The Mayan name of this "Serpent Warrior" is unknown, but the purpose of the bloodletting rite was to cause the "Vision Serpent" to materialize, along with the emerging "Serpent Warrior". This piece is in the form of a hacha, and may have been inserted into a ceremonial yoke, as this piece has a tenon designed behind the head of the serpent. The Mayan stone yoke and hacha pieces were all associated with the Mayan ballgame, and the piece offered here may also have been used in playing the game as well, as it is a slightly smaller example than what is normally seen. This appealing piece is made from a tan gray basalt, and has traces of red cinnabar. There are also spotty minute black mineral deposits, along with some minute root marking. This piece is a scarce to rare example, as there are very few Mayan stone works of art with the "Serpent Warrior" depicted, in addition to what is seen relative to recorded ceramic examples. This piece also sits on a custom metal stand. This piece was offered in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 1997, no. 369. ($2,500.00-$3,500.00 estimates, $5,060.00 realized.) Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, Nov. 1997, no. 369. Ex: Ron Messick Gallery, Santa Fe, NM, circa 1990's. Ex: Private CA. collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #577270
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This exquisite Greek Attic blackware mug is in flawless condition and has a deep black lustrous glaze. This pieces dates circa 5th-4th century BC and is approximately 4.4 inches high by 3.5 inches in diameter at the rim. This piece has attractive minute white calcium deposits and root marking, and the outer and inner surfaces of this piece are exceptional. The deep black lustrous glaze, in combination with the other surface factors noted above, give this piece a high degree of eye appeal. The mint condition of this piece points to the fact that it may also have been solely a votive piece, and was never used in real life. This piece has a black circle/dot pattern symbol, which is seen centered on the base at the bottom. This symbol is a mark for an Athenian ceramic shop, and the esoteric curved shape of the body displays great skill in the potters hand. Ex: Gunter Puhze collection, Germany. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre 1492 item #1399042
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,876.00
This scarce and mint quality piece is a heavy bronze Inka battle ax that dates circa 1440-1532 A.D., and is approximately 5.5 inches long, by 6 inches high from blade tip to blade tip, by 1 inch thick at the blunt terminal end. This massive piece was cast as one piece, then hand beaten into shape with a slightly sharp blade. This piece has a hole in the blunt terminal end, and a rod ran through this hole to hold this heavy piece in place in the wooden shaft. This heavy piece obviously generated tremendous force with an overhead and downward blow, and very little could have stopped this type of weapon from doing heavy damage. It's also quite likely that this weapon was produced to support the Inka in their imperial expansion, especially with their absorbing of the Chimu Empire circa 1470 A.D. This complete piece is also in mint "as found" condition, as it also has a beautiful thick dark to light green patina with spotty red highlights. This appealing piece is an exceptional Inka work of arms, and is seldom seen on the market in this extra large size and condition. A custom metal display stand is also included. (For a nearly identical type see: "Cobre: The Copper of Ancient Peru", AFP Integra Pub., no. 161. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 1970's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1385577
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This superb to mint quality coin is a Greek gold stater of Alexander the Great, circa 323-320 B.C., and grades EF+/FDC (Extremely Fine+/Mint State). This beautiful coin also weighs 8.6 gms, and is perfectly centered. This coin was minted in Miletos, and was struck under Philoxenos, who was a general of Alexander the Great. The obverse (Obv.) of this coin features the helmeted head of Athena facing right, and is wearing a Corinthian helmet with a coiled serpent. There are also flowing locks of hair seen on the cheek and neck, which is also a unique feature of this obverse die and coin type. The reverse (Rev.) has a finely detailed and exceptional standing Nike holding a victory wreath in her extended right hand, and a stylis in the left hand. The Nike seen here is also one of the best examples seen on a coin of this type, as one can see the minute facial details that are not normally seen. There is also a (Delta H) monogram in the left field. (Another example of this type and grade was offered by Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, Auction 72, no. 4047. $2,500.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $5,000.00 realized.) References: Price 2078; SNG Ashmolean 2774. Ex: Harlan J. Berk, Chicago, Ill., circa 1980's. Ex: Private CA. collection, circa 2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1367689
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,265.00
This attractive piece is a Paracas bowl that dates to the Chavinoid Period Paracas, circa 1000-600 B.C., and is approximately 6.8 inches in diameter, by 3.25 inches high. This piece is among the earliest ceramics that were produced by any Andean pre-Columbian culture, and it has very detailed incised geometric "line-designed" motifs. This light to dark brown glazed piece has added dark red highlights, and this dark red color is seen within an incised band that runs around the piece. This band has two incised geometric feline masks seen nearly on opposite sides of the bowl, and between, there are defined boxes that have an incised "hand-design" symbol within each box. The geometric feline masks are seen in a two-dimensional manner, with raised noses from the surface of the bowl, and incised fangs extending above and below a horizontal mouth. The overall design illustrates a very powerful sacred image that also appears to protect the contents of the bowl. Bowls of this type may also have been produced for ritual purposes and/or offerings. This piece is intact, save for a small pie-shaped shard that was repaired back into the main body of the piece. This piece also has some attractive root marking, and the glaze has a very fine even high gloss finish. There is also some dark brown burnishing seen on the bottom surface of the bowl that also adds to the eye appeal of this piece. (Another analogous piece was offered in Sotheby's "Pre-Columbian Art", New York, June 1999, no. 212. $1,200-$1,500.00 estimates, $1,840.00 realized. See attached photo.) Ex: Dr. Gunther Marschall collection, Hamburg, Germany, circa 1960's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Roman : Bronze : Pre AD 1000 item #1264405
Apolonia Ancient Art
$575.00
This mint quality piece is a Roman bronze key that dates circa 1st-2nd century A.D. This piece is approximately 2 inches long, by .75 inches in diameter for the ring seen at the terminal end. This piece has a beautiful light blue to green patina with some spotty red highlights. This piece is in better condition than most examples, and is a mint quality piece with well defined groves seen at the end. This piece may have fit a personal strong box, or possibly a small door. This type of key is also published in "Handwerk und Berfude in der Romischen Stadt', by Rieche & Schalles, Cologne, 1994, pp. 46-47. This nice piece is a complete example of a Roman bronze key that was individually owned by a Roman with some means. This piece also hangs from a custom stand, and can easily be worn today in a necklace. Ex: Private New York collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1335899
Apolonia Ancient Art
$6,875.00
This superb Greek bronze is a solid cast handle with the top section of an oinochoe that dates to the late Archaic Period, circa 520-490 B.C., and is approximately 8 inches high by 5.25 inches in diameter. This piece consists of the upper part of a bronze oinochoe, and it has an amazing designed lion handle that has exceptional detail. This handle was cast as one piece and is very solid. The handle also has a well defined acanthus palmette design at the terminal end, and is solidly attached to the main body of the vessel. The handle has a detailed lion's main which runs up the handle, and away from the realistic designed lion's head that is seen with an open mouth and an extended tongue. The realistic design of the lions head is truly a great work of art, as the minute design is very fine and has exquisite realistic features. This facing lion's head is seen facing the inner spout of the vessel, and this design is a Greek "Archaic Period" convention of art. This impressive piece also has a dainty ivy leaf and tendril floral pattern that is seen running around the neck of the vessel. This beautiful piece also has an exceptional dark green/blue patina, and some light to dark brown deposits. Another analogous example was offered in Christie's Antiquities, Leo Mildenberg collection, Dec. 2011, no. 98. ($4,000.00-$6,000.00 estimates, $5000.00 realized. This piece does not have the detail, nor the superb artistic style of the superb vessel offered here.) The piece offered here is an exceptional "Archaic Period" Greek bronze, and is seldom seen on the market. A custom display stand is also included. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1990's. Ex: Private German collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pottery : Pre AD 1000 item #1224341
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This lustrous piece is a Greek black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa early 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.8 inches high. This scarce to rare piece is intact, has no restoration/repair, and is superb to mint quality condition. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. This appealing piece has a lustrous deep black glaze that has a multi-colored iridescent patina. The underside has no glaze, and there are some minute spotty white calcite deposits seen on the outer surface, and some heavy white calcite deposits seen on the inside surfaces of the vessel. This piece is also an imitation of the analogous shaped bronze and silver vessels of the period, and a silver vessel with an analogous shape to the piece offered here was found in Tomb III of the royal tombs at Vergina, Greece. This silver vessel is also illustrated in "The Search for Alexander: An Exhibition, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., 1980, no. 158, p. 181. (See attached photo.) This type of vessel was created in precious metals, including gilded bronze, for royalty and high nobility, and painted pottery for daily use. Although apparently created for daily use, this piece is scarce to rare, but there is also the possibility that this piece could have been created solely as a votive piece, which represented a more valuable vessel made from precious metals. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece, such as the vessel offered here, was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. See attached photo.) On the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and Names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Private Swiss collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Phoenix Ancient Art, Geneva and New York, Inv.#091613-04. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Egyptian : Pre AD 1000 item #1378327
Apolonia Ancient Art
$785.00
This intact piece is an Egyptian faience Ptah head that dates to the Late Period, circa 713-332 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.2 inches high, is an intact example, and is a large example for the type. This piece was originally made as an amulet in the form of the Egyptian god Ptah, and has an attractive light green glaze. There is also an attached suspension hoop seen on the lower backside of the piece, and this piece was likely worn by an individual as a "protector" type amulet. The appealing bust of Ptah offered here also appears to be bald and/or is seen wearing a skull cap, and has deeply molded facial features that convey a slight smile with a serene expression. Ptah was also a popular god in ancient Egypt, and was the ancient Egyptian creator god of Memphis and patron of craftsmen. The piece seen here was not only likely worn as an amulet, but it was also likely to have been intentionally and ceremoniously broken, which subsequently killed the magic of the piece. This piece is in superb condition, has a nice even glaze, and is slightly bigger than most examples. This piece is also mounted on a custom display stand. Ex: Kathe Hartmann collection, Germany, circa 1950's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1352464
Apolonia Ancient Art
$875.00
This superb piece is a Greek bronze saucer bead that was produced during the Geometric period, circa 800-700 B.C. This piece is approximately 1.75 inches in diameter, by .85 inches high, and is an extremely large example for the type. This piece is a solid example, as it was cast as one piece, and was made from a mold. This solid piece is intact, and has no damage and/or deep surface scrapes. There are also six decorative round "target eye" symbol designs seen on each side, and they were hand stamped on each side. There is also a rounded collar seen on each side at the opening, and the interior is hollow, as this piece was likely designed as a bead, and may have been the central component in a beaded necklace that had other similar beads with graduating sizes. This piece also has smooth sides, and this piece is well finished, as well as having a very esoteric "saucer type" shape and design. This esoteric piece also has a nice dark brown/green patina, with some minute spotty red highlights. Large Greek Geometric Period beads of this type were likely worn in life, and were also votive in nature, and are now scarce on the market in this size. This attractive piece can easily be worn today in a custom made necklace, or simply on a leather string. This piece is also fitted to a custom display stand, and can easily be removed. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1980's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #996901
Apolonia Ancient Art
$1,865.00
This piece is a rare Greek iron spearpoint that also has its accompanying butt-spike. This pieces dates to the Hellenistic period, circa 4th century B.C., and is intact in superb condition. The condition is remarkable, given the fact that this weapon is made from iron and not bronze. The metal is compact with very little flaking, and is in very stable in solid condition, as this piece has an earthen over glaze and this piece is in its natural "as found" condition. There are very few ancient Greek iron weapons that have survived from antiquity that is in the superb condition seen here. The spearpoint and the butt-spike are both approximately 10 inches long, and both have a shank-end diameter of approximately .6 inches. The spearpoint has a blade width of approximately 1.2 inches, and the butt-spike has a central width of approximately .45 inches. This weapon was finely made, and the butt-spike has a double decorative ring seen mid-point, and the shanks of the spearpoint and butt-spike both have fine workmanship. The butt-spike also has a square design at the tip, and the double ring is the design point where this butt-spike becomes a round shank at the other end. The diameter of this piece is small compared to most iron spearpoints of this type, and this piece was probably used primarily as a throwing javelin, as well as a weapon for close-in fighting by the Greek hoplite. Its known that the Greek hoplite, during the 4th century B.C., carried more than one spear, and this weapon is light enough for this to be the case. The spearpoint and the buut-spike are nearly identical in weight and length, and therefore the javelin was well balanced, and an estimate of this weapon's original length could have been up to about 260cm. This piece dates to the period of Philip II, who was king of Macedonia circa 359-336 B.C., and this military genius transformed his army with many innovative weapons and battle tactics. The weapon seen here was one such weapon, as the finest Greek weapons during the Hellenistic period were forged from iron. A.M. Snodgrass thought this type of weapon had a dual role for the Greek hoplite as a throwing and stabbing weapon, and also served as the primary weapon of the light armed javelin-throwers (akontistai). (See A.M. Snodgrass, "Arms and Armour of the Greeks", Cornell University Press, 1967, pp. 77-79.) This piece is rare and is seldom seen in this condition on todays market. Ex: Private German collection. (Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1376342
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This rare piece is a Greek attic black-glazed oinochoe that dates circa 4th century B.C., and is approximately 5.4 inches high, by 3.6 inches in diameter at the center of the vessel. This attractive piece is intact with no repair/restoration, and is in superb to flawless condition, save for some minor glaze loss on the upper spout section. This piece has a long neck, a trefoil beaked spout, a cylindrical strap handle, and a sharp carination at the juncture of the cylindrical body and the long neck. There is also an impressed "egg-and-dart" motif design seen at the edge of the upper shoulder, and an effigy bull's head that is built into the spout design, which also has a horn on each side of the handle. In addition, this piece has a flat bottom with a collector tag reading "no. 34". This piece also has a lustrous black glaze with dark brown burnishing seen in sections of the vessel, with an unglazed reserve at the bottom of the vessel. This type of vessel was also created in precious metals, and although there is the possibility that this piece was created for everyday use, it may also have been created solely as a "votive" type piece. An analogous scarce to rare black glazed pottery piece was offered in Sotheby's Antiquities, New York, Dec. 2001, no. 102. ($2,000.00-$3,000.00 estimates, $3,900.00 realized. see attached photo.) For the extremely rare form and type see: "Shapes and names of Athenian Vases" by G. Richter and M. Milne, New York, 1935, pp. 18-20, fig. 130. Ex: Hans Piehler collection, Germany, circa 1940's-1960's. Ex: Private German collection, circa 2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1389637
Apolonia Ancient Art
$3,265.00
This piece is a black glazed Colima seated shaman that dates to the Protoclassic Period, circa 100 B.C.-250 A.D., and is approximately 10.8 inches high. This pleasing piece has a deep black lustrous glaze over the entire piece, and is scarce as such, as most Colima examples of this type have a red to reddish brown glaze. This seated shaman is seen gesturing with a left upraised arm, and this arm also forms an open spout. This lively shaman is also seen with his right hand placed on his thigh, "coffee-bean" type eyes, an extended nose, and a serene expression. He is also seen wearing a linear patterned lion cloth that is designed with detailed white incised lines, and these incised designs are seen on both sides of the body. In addition, he is also seen wearing a shell pectoral, and a tall "turban-helmet" with a raised horn that also has side straps that are seen falling to the shoulders. This piece was also likely created as a "protector" type piece, and was an individual that had magical powers. This piece is intact, save for a re-attached left leg, and is 100% original. Overall, this piece is an exceptional example, as it has great detail with the incised decorative elements, and the black glaze that is seldom seen. Ex: Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, New York, May 1989, no. 100. Ex: Private Kansas collection, circa 1990's-2000's. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Americas : Pre Columbian : Pre AD 1000 item #1377885
Apolonia Ancient Art
$925.00
This superb vessel is a Chimu/Lambayeque blackware stirrup-vessel that dates circa 1100-1400 A.D. This intact vessel is approximately 8.5 inches high, and has a solid black lustrous glaze with some attractive dark brown burnishing. There is some minute spotty black mineral deposits, and this intact piece is in superb condition with no repair/restoration. This piece shows a bust of a god with projecting serpent heads on each side of the central spout, four panels on the upper shoulder with facing nobles with collars and crested "tumi-type" headdresses, and a single handle with two attached prone adoration figures that are facing one another. The god bust has fine incised facial details, and may represent the legendary Lambayeque king "Naymlap". The two facing prone figures seen on the handle may be depicted as "riding" or "flying" on the handle, which also refers to the myth of "Naymlap", who was thought to have flown into the sky. This vessel may also be a "ceremonial type" vessel that was used for libations, and the vessel offered here has exceptional surfaces, and is more detailed than other vessels of this type. Another analogous example is seen in Sotheby's Pre-Columbian Art, May 27, 1998, no. 244. ($500.00-$700.00 estimates, $460.00 realized. See attached description/photo.) Ex: Private German collection, circa 1980's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1393793
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This mint quality Greek Paestan "applied red-figure" hydria dates circa 360-350 B.C., and is approximately 11.2 inches high. This piece is attributed to the Asteas-Python workshop, and is an early piece with many attributes of the Asteas painter. This lovely hydria is in flawless condition, and has some spotty white calcite deposits seen mostly on the back of the piece that has a large palmate fan design. The front of this piece has two figures, one seated woman at the right that is seen nude from the waist up holding a mirror, and a standing draped woman that is seen holding a fillet. The upper shoulder has a beautiful "ivy leaf and berry" wreath design that runs around the vessel, and meets with a rosette at the front center of the piece. There are also two female busts, one seen under each handle, and one appears to be older than the other, and may represent Demeter, and her daughter Persephone. This piece also has a deep black glaze, and this thick even glaze is also seen running down inside the raised neck as well. This piece has attributes that are attributed to the Asteas painter such as: identical line design of the woman's busts seen under each handle that have incised hair and upper shoulder incised drapery, extended chins, thick lower lips, and large dotted eyes. In addition, the standing woman seen on the front side has a single stripe running down the drapery, and the seated nude woman has a thin waist and elongated upper torso. All of these attributes are classified as being attributed to early Asteas ceramics as seen in A.D. Trendall, "The red-Figured Vases of Paestum", British School at Rome, pp. 63-80. Michael Padgett of Princeton University also commented that this vessel was produced with the "applied red-figure" production technique, rather than the "red-figure" production technique, and both production techniques are entirely different. The "red-figure" ceramics were produced with the black glaze outlining where the figures went on the piece, and the red glaze was then added on this reserve. With the "applied red-figure" production technique, the black glaze covered the entire vessel, and the red glaze was applied over the black glaze. Incised detailing was sometimes added to the figures, as was the case regarding the lovely vessel offered here, and these pieces are rare to extremely rare. Consequently, this intact piece is seldom seen on the market, and is an exceptional early example attributed to the Asteas painter workshop. Ex: Private New York collection, circa 1980's. Ex: Royal Athena Gallery, New York, and Published in "One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases", Nov. 1990, no. 166 (Listed at $9,500.00). Ex: Private CA. collection. I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1315774
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This lustrous piece is a Greek Attic skyphos cup that dates circa 5th-4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 3 inches high, by 6.3 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair/restoration, and has a rich even black lustrous surface that is seen both on the outer and inner surfaces. In addition, the black glaze is complete on the inner surface which also points to the fine workmanship of this vessel. This piece also has some minute spotty white calcite deposits, and some minute root marking seen in sections of this piece. The lustrous black glazed surface also has a multi-colored iridescent patina. This piece also has a flat base, and two attached strap handles. This piece is an exceptional example, is in mint to superb condition, and is better than most examples of the type. Ex: Fortuna Fine Arts, New York, circa 1990's. Ex: Private New York collection. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition:
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Ancient World : Greek : Pre AD 1000 item #1381367
Apolonia Ancient Art
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This intact vessel is a Greek Messapian lidded "lebes gamikos" vessel that dates circa 4th century B.C. This attractive piece is approximately 4.75 inches high, by 4.4 inches wide from handle to handle. This piece is intact, with no repair and/or restoration, and is superb to mint quality, in addition to being in it's pristine "as found" condition. This piece has some minute root marking and light brown ground deposits, along with a beautiful light brown patina. This piece has two raised handles above the shoulder, a round pedestal base, and a lid with a raised knob in the shape and size of an olive. This piece also has dark brown decorative elements with concentric circles seen on the lid and upper shoulder, and a light brown slip is seen over the main body of the vessel. This dainty little piece is very esoteric and has a very attractive design, and was likely a storage vessel for seeds, olives, and/or grains. A very well made piece with a high degree of eye appeal. An old collection number (0045) is also seen under the lid and base of the vessel. Ex: Private Austrian collection, circa 1940's-2000's. (Note: Additional documentation is available to the purchaser, including EU Export and US Customs Import documentation.) I certify that this piece is authentic as to date, culture, and condition: